Tag Archives: Yuki Kawauchi

Only three Kenyans invited to Osaka Marathon

Three Kenyan male runners are the only elite athletes invited at the combined 10th edition of the Osaka Marathon and 77th Lake Biwa Mainichi Marathon that will be held on Sunday (27) in Osaka, Japan.

The three invited elite athletes are James Rungaru, Allan Biwott and Joseph Macharia Ndirangu. Macharia leads the group as he comes with the fastest time on paper of 2:07.53 that he got when he took the honors at the 2018 Lake Biwa Marathon.

Rungaru has had a gradual rise from the track to being half marathons specialty an he comes to this race with a personal best of 2:08.25 that he got at the 2021 Fukuoka International Marathon where he finished in position three.

Another title contender is Allan Biwott who is making his marathon debut and he carries on his shoulders a personal best of 1:06.08 that he got at the 2019 Kenitra Half Marathon.

The three kenyans will face off with 275 Japanese that will be led by Yuta Shitara, who is the fastest runner in Japan, and Yuki Kawauchi, who will participate in the Osaka Marathon for the first time in 10 years since the first marathon.

The nine invited Japanese male runners have run under the sub 2:08 mark. The invited five female marathoners will be led Mai Ito, who represented Japan at the Rio Olympics.

The combined Tokyo and Lake Biwa Mainichi Marathon have invited a total number of 322.

The race course record for Tokyo marathon is 2:07.47 and was set in 2019 Asefa Tefera from Ethiopia while the women record is 2:26.29 and was set in 2019 by Aberu Mekuria also from Ethiopia in 2019. While Lake Biwa Marathon course record is held by Japan’s Kengo Suzuki with a time of 2:04.56 that was set in 2021.

Boston Marathon: All-time men’s, women’s winners

Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi and American Desiree Linden got to add their names to the list of Boston Marathon winners in 2018.

Kawauchi became the first Japanese men’s winner since 1987 and Linden became the first woman to win from the U.S. since 1985.

The Boston Marathon is the longest running marathon in the world. It’s been held annually since 1897. The first 69 years of the race were run by only men, with women starting to unofficially compete in 1966, then officially in 1972. The race, held on Patriots Day in the greater metro area of Boston, is also the first to incorporate a wheelchair division, starting in 1975.

Clarence DeMar holds the record for most men’s wins with seven while Catherine Ndereba has the most women’s wins with four.

Below is the all-time list of men’s and women’s winners of the Boston Marathon.

Boston Marathon: All-time winners

Men

Year Winner Country Time
1897 John J. McDermott United States 2:55:10
1898 Ronald J. MacDonald Canada 2:42:00
1899 Lawrence Brignolia United States 2:54:38
1900 John Caffery Canada 2:39:44
1901 John Caffery Canada 2:29:23
1902 Sammy Mellor United States 2:43:12
1903 John Lorden United States 2:41:29
1904 Michael Spring United States 2:38:04
1905 Frederick Lorz United States 2:38:25
1906 Tim Ford United States 2:45:45
1907 Thomas Longboat Canada 2:24:24
1908 Thomas Morrissey United States 2:25:43
1909 Henri Renaud United States 2:53:36
1910 Fred Cameron Canada 2:28:52
1911 Clarence DeMar United States 2:21:39
1912 Michael J. Ryan United States 2:21:18
1913 Fritz Carlson United States 2:25:14
1914 James Duffy Canada 2:25:14
1915 Edouard Fabre Canada 2:31:41
1916 Arthur Roth United States 2:27:16
1917 Bill Kennedy United States 2:28:37
1918 Camp Devens relay team United States 2:29:53
1919 Carl Linder United States 2:29:13
1920 Peter Trivoulides Greece 2:29:31
1921 Frank Zuna United States 2:18:57
1922 Clarence DeMar United States 2:18:10
1923 Clarence DeMar United States 2:23:47
1924 Clarence DeMar United States 2:29:40
1925 Charles Mellor United States 2:33:00
1926 Johnny Miles Canada 2:25:40
1927 Clarence DeMar United States 2:40:22
1928 Clarence DeMar United States 2:37:07
1929 Johnny Miles Canada 2:33:08
1930 Clarence DeMar United States 2:34:48
1931 James Henigan United States 2:46:45
1932 Paul de Bruyn Germany 2:33:36
1933 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:31:01
1934 Dave Komonen Canada 2:32:53
1935 John A. Kelley United States 2:32:07
1936 Ellison Brown United States 2:33:40
1937 Walter Young Canada 2:33:20
1938 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:35:34
1939 Ellison Brown United States 2:28:51
1940 Gerard Cote Canada 2:28:28
1941 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:30:38
1942 Joe Smith United States 2:26:51
1943 Gerard Cote Canada 2:28:25
1944 Gerard Cote Canada 2:31:50
1945 John A. Kelley United States 2:30:40
1946 Stylianos Kyriakides Greece 2:29:27
1947 Suh Yun-bok South Korea 2:25:39
1948 Gerard Cote Canada 2:31:02
1949 Gosta Leandersson Sweden 2:31:50
1950 Ham Kee-Yong South Korea 2:32:39
1951 Shigeki Tanaka Japan 2:27:45
1952 Doroteo Flores Guatemala 2:31:53
1953 Keizo Yamada Japan 2:18:51
1954 Veikko Karvonen Finland 2:20:39
1955 Hideo Hamamura Japan 2:18:22
1956 Antti Viskari Finland 2:14:14
1957 John J. Kelley United States 2:20:05
1958 Franjo Mihalic Yugoslavia 2:25:54
1959 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:22:42
1960 Paavo Kotila Finland 2:20:54
1961 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:23:39
1962 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:23:48
1963 Aurele Vandendriessche Belgium 2:18:58
1964 Aurele Vandendriessche Belgium 2:19:59
1965 Morio Shigematsu Japan 2:16:33
1966 Kenji Kimihara Japan 2:17:11
1967 Dave McKenzie New Zealand 2:15:45
1968 Amby Burfoot United States 2:22:17
1969 Yoshiaki Unetani Japan 2:13:49
1970 Ron Hill United Kingdom 2:10:30
1971 Alvaro Mejia Colombia 2:18:45
1972 Olavi Suomalainen Finland 2:15:39
1973 Jon Anderson United States 2:16:03
1974 Neil Cusack Ireland 2:13:39
1975 Bill Rodgers United States 2:09:55
1976 Jack Fultz United States 2:20:19
1977 Jerome Drayton Canada 2:14:46
1978 Bill Rodgers United States 2:10:13
1979 Bill Rodgers United States 2:09:27
1980 Bill Rodgers United States 2:12:11
1981 Toshihiko Seko Japan 2:09:26
1982 Alberto Salazar United States 2:08:52
1983 Greg Meyer United States 2:09:00
1984 Geoff Smith United Kingdom 2:10:34
1985 Geoff Smith United Kingdom 2:14:05
1986 Robert de Castella Australia 2:07:51
1987 Toshihiko Seko Japan 2:11:50
1988 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:08:43
1989 Abebe Mekonnen Ethiopia 2:09:06
1990 Gelindo Bordin Italy 2:08:19
1991 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:11:06
1992 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:08:14
1993 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:09:33
1994 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:07:15
1995 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:09:22
1996 Moses Tanui Kenya 2:09:15
1997 Lameck Aguta Kenya 2:10:34
1998 Moses Tanui Kenya 2:07:34
1999 Joseph Chebet Kenya 2:09:52
2000 Elijah Lagat Kenya 2:09:47
2001 Lee Bong-Ju South Korea 2:09:43
2002 Rodgers Rop Kenya 2:09:02
2003 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:10:11
2004 Timothy Cherigat Kenya 2:10:37
2005 Hailu Negussie Ethiopia 2:11:44
2006 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:07:14
2007 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:14:13
2008 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:07:45
2009 Deriba Merga Ethiopia 2:08:42
2010 Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot Kenya 2:05:52
2011 Geoffrey Mutai Kenya 2:03:02
2012 Wesley Korir Kenya 2:12:40
2013 Lelisa Desisa Benti Ethiopia 2:10:22
2014 Meb Keflezighi United States 2:08:37
2015 Lelisa Desisa Benti Ethiopia 2:09:17
2016 Lemi Berhanu Hayle Ethiopia 2:12:45
2017 Geoffrey Kirui Kenya 2:09:37
2018 Yuki Kawauchi Japan 2:15:58

Women

Year Winner Country Time
1966 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:21:40
1967 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:27:17
1968 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:30:00
1969 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:22:46
1970 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:05:07
1971 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:08:30
1972 Nina Kuscsik United States 3:10:26
1973 Jacqueline Hansen United States 3:05:59
1974 Miki Gorman United States 2:47:11
1975 Liane Winter West Germany 2:42:24
1976 Kim Merritt United States 2:47:10
1977 Miki Gorman United States 2:48:33
1978 Gayle Barron United States 2:44:52
1979 Joan Benoit United States 2:35:15
1980 Rosie Ruiz* Cuba 2:31:56
1980 Jacqueline Gareau Canada 2:34:28
1981 Allison Roe New Zealand 2:26:46
1982 Charlotte Teske West Germany 2:29:33
1983 Joan Benoit United States 2:22:43
1984 Lorraine Moller New Zealand 2:29:28
1985 Lisa Larsen Weidenbach United States 2:34:06
1986 Ingrid Kristiansen Norway 2:24:55
1987 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:25:21
1988 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:24:30
1989 Ingrid Kristiansen Norway 2:24:33
1990 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:25:24
1991 Wanda Panfil Poland 2:24:18
1992 Olga Markova Russia 2:23:43
1993 Olga Markova Russia 2:25:27
1994 Uta Pippig Germany 2:21:45
1995 Uta Pippig Germany 2:25:11
1996 Uta Pippig Germany 2:27:12
1997 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:26:23
1998 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:23:21
1999 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:23:25
2000 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:26:11
2001 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:23:53
2002 Margaret Okayo Kenya 2:20:43
2003 Svetlana Zakharova Russia 2:25:19
2004 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:24:27
2005 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:25:12
2006 Rita Jeptoo Kenya 2:23:38
2007 Lidiya Grigoryeva Russia 2:29:18
2008 Dire Tune Ethiopia 2:25:25
2009 Salina Kosgei Kenya 2:32:16
2010 Teyba Erkesso Ethiopia 2:26:11
2011 Caroline Kilel Kenya 2:22:36
2012 Sharon Cherop Kenya 2:31:50
2013 Rita Jeptoo Kenya 2:26:25
2014 Rita Jeptoo* Kenya 2:18:57
2014 Bizunesh Deba Ethiopia 2:19:59
2015 Caroline Rotich Kenya 2:24:55
2016 Atsede Baysa Ethiopia 2:29:19
2017 Edna Kiplagat Kenya 2:21:52
2018 Desiree Linden United States 2:39:54

(*) denotes disqualification

sportingnews.com

World’s Fastest ever men’s field assembled for Boston Marathon

The organisers of the 126th edition of the Boston Marathon, which is the World Athletics Platinum Elite Label Road Race, have released their fastest ever elite list for men that will be held on Monday April 18, 2022 in Boston.

Three time Olympic champion Kenenisa Bekele from Ethiopia leads the elite list of 12 men who have gone under the 2:06 mark. Bekele is the second fastest marathon runner in history with a personal best of 2:01.41.

“I recognise the tradition of the Boston Marathon and look forward to racing in April,” said Bekele. “For many years Ethiopia has had a strong tradition in Boston, and I am excited to join that legacy. I have long looked forward to racing the Boston Marathon.”

Seven of the past eight winners will also return to Boston, including 2021 champion Benson Kipruto of Kenya. Lawrence Cherono (2019), Yuki Kawauchi (2018), Geoffrey Kirui (2017), Lemi Berhanu (2016), and two times winner Lelisa Desisa (2015 and 2013) are the other six former winners.

The 2021 fastest man in marathon, Titus Ekiru, who holds a personal best of 2:02.57 that he got in Milan, will be battling for the top honors too. “I am happy to announce that I’ll be lining the street of Boston Marathon for my first time next April in the Boston Marathon]. Can’t wait for it!”

The 2020 world leader Evans Chebet, New York City Marathon winner Albert Korir, and three-time world half marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor.

LEADING RESULTS

42KM MEN

  1. Kenenisa Bekele      (ETH) 2:01.41
  2. Titus Ekiru               (KEN) 2:02.57
  3. Evans Chebet           (KEN) 2:03.00
  4. Lawrence Cherono  (KEN) 2:03.04
  5. Bernard Koech         (KEN) 2:04.09
  6. Lemi Berhanu          (ETH) 2:04.33
  7. Lelisa Desisa            (ETH) 2:04.45
  8. Gabriel Geay             (TAN) 2:04.55
  9. Benson Kipruto        (KEN) 2:05.13
  10. Geoffrey Kamworor (KEN) 2:05.23
  11. Eric Kiptanui             (KEN) 2:05.47
  12. Bethwell Yegon         (KEN) 2:06.14
  13. Geoffrey Kirui            (KEN) 2:06.27
  14. Eyob Faniel                 (ITA) 2:07.19
  15. Yuki Kawauchi           (JPN) 2:07.27
  16. Albert Korir                (KEN) 2:08.03
  17. Amanuel Mesel          (ERI) 2:08.17
  18. Bayelign Teshager     (ETH) 2:08.28
  19. Tsegay Weldibanos    (ERI) 2:09.07
  20. Scott Fauble                (USA) 2:09.09
  21. Colin Bennie               (USA) 2:09.38
  22. Trevor Hofbauer         (CAN) 2:09.51
  23. Jared Ward                   (USA) 2:09.25
  24. Ian Butler                     (USA) 2:09.45
  25. Mick Iacofano             (USA) 2:09.55
  26. Jake Riley                     (USA) 2:10.02
  27. Jerrell Mock                 (USA) 2:10.37
  28. Jemal Yimer                (ETH) 2:10.38
  29. Juan Luis Barrios       (MEX) 2:10.55
  30. Matt McDonald          (USA) 2:11.10
  31. Matt Llano                   (USA) 2:11.14
  32. Elkanah Kibet              (USA) 2:11.15
  33. CJ Albertson                (USA) 2:11.18
  34. Diego Estrada              (USA) 2:11.54

Domnic Nyairo wins the 2021 Hofu Marathon

Kenya’s Domnic Nyairo took the top honors at the 52nd Hofu Yomiuri Marathon that was held on Sunday (19) in Hofiu City, Yamaguchi Prefecture.

Nyairo who was making his first marathon appearance was pushed to the wire by two Japanese runners

Daichi Kamino and Yuki Kawauchi, who is the 2018 Boston Marathon winner.

The two held onto Nyairo until the 33km mark when Nyairo and Kamino pulled away leaving Kawauchi to gasp for some air.

The Kenyan was pushed to the wire but managed to have a kick that led him to cut the tape in a new personal best best of 2:09.34 with Kamino pulling the same time when he crossed the line in second place.

Kawauchi the 2011 World Champion silver marathon medallist was forced to settle in third place as he closed the first three podium finishes in 2:10.11.

LEADING RESULTS

42KM MEN

Domnic Nyairo   (KEN) 2:09.34

Daichi Kamino    (JPN)  2:09.34

Yuki Kawauchi   (JPN)  2:10.11

Kirui, Karoki relish Chicago marathon challenge in battle against Farah

Kenyan runners Geoffrey Kirui and Bedan Karoki may not be the top names at the Chicago marathon, but the duo are holding their cards close to their chest as they plot a surprise show on Oct 7.

Kirui, the 2017 Boston marathon champion, was pushed to second position in defense of his title in April while Karoki, who had finished third in last year’s London race, was fifth in the English capital clocking 2:08:34.

Now the two are relishing challenging the status quo in Chicago, albeit from an obscure position.

“The pressure is no longer on me like was the case in London. I can relax and focus on running my own race and leave the top names to choke each other out,” Wanjiru said on Tuesday from his training base in Eldoret.

Organizers have assembled together at least 11 men who have run two hours and seven minutes or faster, including past champions Abel Kirui and Dickson Chumba.

They will face off against Britain’s Mo Farah, Kenneth Kipkemoi, Paul Lonyangata, Kirui, Karoki, Stephen Sambu and Augustine Choge.

“We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski.

“This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago,” he added.

Karoki, a two-time Olympian in the 10,000m, is an exciting athlete who made his marathon debut in 2017.

Prior to jumping to the marathon, he spent nearly a decade polishing his speed on the track, representing Kenya three times in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships.

“I still need to learn more in marathon. But I have high hopes of doing well in Chicago. Training is going on well with no injury concerns,” said Karoki.

Kipkemoi boasts the 25th fastest time in history over the half marathon distance, 59:01, and he started 2018 with a successful marathon debut, running 2:05:44 to win the Rotterdam Marathon.

On the other hand, Lonyangata missed a spot in the top three in Chicago in 2016, coming home in fourth after enduring uneven pace swings.

He set his personal best, 2:06:10, while winning the 2017 Paris Marathon, and he welcomed 2018 by becoming the first back-to-back winner of the Paris Marathon in nearly two decades.

However, Kirui experienced a significant career breakthrough when he won the laurel wreath at the 2017 Boston Marathon, shaking off American Galen Rupp to victory.

That win set him up for the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships, where he was eighth.

Kirui returned to Boston in to defend his title in April, but he failed to match the strides of a hard charging Yuki Kawauchi and he was forced to settle for second.

October marks Kirui’s second attempt in Chicago, where he had made his marathon debut in 2014, but he dropped out of the race.

Source: xinhuanet.com

Abel Kirui,Dickson Chumba and Brigid Kosgei Headline Bank of America Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that several international running stars are joining the 41st annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon elite athlete competition.

Past champions Abel Kirui (KEN) and Dickson Chumba (KEN) lead the charge on the men’s side, and 2017 runner-up Brigid Kosgei (KEN) and two-time podium finisher Birhane Dibaba (ETH) stand out among the women. They will join previously announced global sensations Mo Farah (GBR), Yuki Kawauchi (JPN) and Suguru Osako (JPN).

This year’s elite field includes 11 men who have run 2:07 or faster and nine women (including three Americans) who have run 2:25 or faster. Moreover, it features five of the top eight men who placed on top of the Abbott World Marathon Majors (AbbottWMM) Series XI leaderboard and two of the top seven women.

“We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Bank of America Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski. ‘This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international and American athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago.”

Men’s International Field

Dickson Chumba set his personal best, 2:04:32, in Chicago in 2014 when he finished third on a historic day that witnessed three of the top five times ever run in Chicago (Chumba is the fifth fastest runner in Chicago’s history). He came back to win in 2015 and while he tried to defend his title in 2016, he came up three seconds short, finishing second to Abel Kirui. Since he embarked on his marathon career in 2010, he has finished 17 marathons and he boasts an impressive record: five wins, five runner-ups and four third place finishes. He lines up this fall after opening his 2018 season with his second win at the Tokyo Marathon. His time, 2:05:30, was the second fastest winning time in Tokyo’s history. Chumba finished in fifth place on the AbbottWMM Series XI leaderboard.

Abel Kirui literally danced across the finish line when he won his first AbbottWMM in Chicago in 2016, defeating a strong field in a tactical race that saw erratic pace swings from 4:33 per mile to 5:24. He returned in 2017 to defend his title, but he failed to match Galen Rupp’s kick at the end. Kirui consistently performs well in both tactical and paced races; he finished fourth in London to commence his 2018 season, and he owns a personal best of 2:05:04. Kirui also stands out as one of the most decorated athletes in the field – he took home a silver medal in the marathon at the 2012 London Olympics and he won both the 2009 and 2011 IAAF World Marathon Championships.

Mosinet Geremew (ETH) and Birhanu Legese (ETH) bring both youth and speed to a competitive international field. Geremew started 2018 with a bang, breaking the course record in Dubai and posting a fresh personal best, 2:04:00. He has run south of the hour mark four times in the half marathon, and he is a four-time winner of the Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon. Chicago marks his second shot at competing in an AbbottWMM (and just his fourth go at 42K). He lined up last fall in Berlin and ran away with an impressive third place finish.

Legese, the youngest athlete in this year’s elite field, opened the year by making his marathon debut in Dubai, finishing sixth in a swift 2:04:15. Prior to moving up in distance, he specialized in the half marathon, winning titles in New Delhi (twice), Berlin and the United Arab Emirates. He holds a personal best in the half of 59:20.

Kenneth Kipkemoi (KEN), Paul Lonyangata (KEN), Geoffrey Kirui (KEN), Bedan Karoki (KEN), Stephen Sambu (KEN) and Augustine Choge (KEN) continue the marathon’s tradition of welcoming strong athletes from Kenya to the windy city. Kipkemoi boasts the 25th fastest time in history over the half marathon distance, 59:01, and he started 2018 with a successful marathon debut, running 2:05:44 to win the Rotterdam Marathon. He has represented Kenya in both the half marathon and the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships.

Lonyangata just missed a spot in the top three in Chicago in 2016, coming home in fourth after enduring uneven pace swings. He set his personal best, 2:06:10, while winning the 2017 Paris Marathon, and he welcomed 2018 by becoming the first back-to-back winner of the Paris Marathon in nearly two decades.

Geoffrey Kirui experienced a significant career breakthrough when he won the laurel wreath at the 2017 Boston Marathon, shaking off American Galen Rupp in the 24th mile to cruise home to victory. That win set him up for what happened next: he took the crown at the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships.

Kirui returned to Boston this spring to defend his title, but he failed to match the strides of a hard charging Yuki Kawauchi and he was forced to settle for second. October marks Kirui’s second attempt in Chicago – he made his marathon debut here in 2014, but he dropped out of the race.

Karoki, a two-time Olympian in the 10,000m, is an exciting athlete who made his marathon debut in 2017. Prior to jumping to the marathon, he spent nearly a decade polishing his speed on the track, representing Kenya three times in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships. He made a splash this winter when he won the Ras Al Khaimah International Half Marathon in a blistering 58:42, making him the fourth fastest man in history in the half (with the fifth fastest time). He finished second at the 2016 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships, and he has finished third and fifth at the London Marathon in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

As a four-time winner of the Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K (with three of the 14 fastest times in course history), Sambu returns to Chicago as a fan favorite. He made his marathon debut here in 2016 with a fifth place finish, and he returned in 2017 to accrue another fifth place. Sambu’s speed over shorter distances predicts a faster marathon PR. With the reintroduction of pacers into this year’s field, Sambu could finally land in the top three.

Choge, a 2008 Olympian in the 1500m, has been a factor on the global stage for nearly half his life. He competed as a junior and, as a senior competitor, he has amassed an impressive resume: a world record as part of the 4x1500m Kenyan relay team, a Commonwealth Games 5000m win, a silver and bronze at the indoor IAAF World Championships, five Diamond League titles and eight Gold League wins. Choge started his transition to the roads in 2013 and he holds a personal best of 59:26 in the half. He will be making his marathon debut on October 7.

Ryo Kiname (JPN) joins previously announced Kawauchi as strong contender from Japan. Kiname, racing in North America for the first time, enters Chicago with a fresh personal best and a seventh place finish from the 2018 Tokyo Marathon, 2:08:08. He has one marathon career win to his name – the Sapporo Hokkaido Marathon in 2016.

International men’s elite field

Name

Mosinet Geremew

Birhanu Legese

Dickson Chumba

Abel Kirui

Kenneth Kipkemoi

Paul Lonyangata

Mo Farah

Geoffrey Kirui

Suguru Osako

Bedan Karoki

Ryo Kiname

Yuki Kawauchi

Mohamed Reda

Stephen Sambu

Tsukasa Koyama

Yohei Suzuki

Taku Fujimoto

Pardon Ndhlovu

Daniel Wallis

Augustine Choge

Hugh Williams

Country

ETH

ETH

KEN

KEN

KEN

KEN

GBR

KEN

JPN

KEN

JPN

JPN

MAR

KEN

JPN

JPN

JPN

ZIM

NZL

KEN

AUS

Personal best

2:04:00

2:04:15

2:04:32

2:05:04

2:05:44

2:06:10

2:06:21

2:06:27

2:07:19

2:07:41

2:08:08

2:08:14

2:09:18

2:11:07

2:11:20

2:14:53

2:15:30

2:16:22

2:19:24

Debut

Debut

Women’s International Field

Brigid Kosgei (KEN) ran spectacularly in Chicago last fall, finishing second to Tirunesh Dibaba, arguably one of the greatest runners in history. En route to her second place finish in Chicago, she smashed her personal best, running 2:20:22. Nine weeks later, she won the Honolulu Marathon in 2:22:15, a course record by over five minutes. Kosgei recorded her first marathon finish in 2015, and she has been making waves ever since. Most recently, she finished second in London in a new PR, 2:20:13. She finished in third place on the AbbottWMM leaderboard.

Roza Dereje (ETH) impressed fans in Dubai to start her 2018 season, taking down the course record and setting a three-minute PR, 2:19:17, to become the eighth fastest woman in history. She followed Dubai with another personal best, 1:07:00, and a second place finish in April at the Istanbul Half Marathon. Prior to gaining global recognition this winter, she started making a name for herself after she won the Shanghai Marathon twice in 2016 and 2017; in 2017, she posted the second fastest time, 2:22:43, in the history of the Shanghai Marathon. Dereje made her global debut in 2015 with a 2:34:02 marathon. Since then, she has run nine marathons. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon marks her first time running in an AbbottWMM.

Birhane Dibaba (ETH) took home a pair of third place finishes in Chicago in 2014 and 2015, and she arrives this fall with something only 27 women have accomplished in history: a sub 2:20 PR. Dibaba joined this exclusive club after winning the Tokyo Marathon this winter in 2:19:51. She primarily races the marathon distance, and she has finished in the top five of 13 of the 14 marathons she has run. Her compatriot, Shure Demise (ETH), is running her first Bank of America Chicago Marathon, but she has fared well on the global stage since she picked up back-to-back wins in Toronto in 2015 and 2016. She set her personal best, 2:20:59, at the 2015 Dubai Marathon. She performed well at the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships, finishing fifth. She opened her 2018 season with a fourth place at the Tokyo Marathon.

Yuka Ando (JPN) made headlines in 2017 (just shy of her 23rd birthday) when she clocked the fastest ever debut marathon by a Japanese woman, 2:21:36, at the Nagoya Marathon. Her debut performance also made her the fourth fastest woman in Japan’s history, and it was the fastest time by a Japanese woman since 2005. As a result, she punched her ticket to the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships where she finished 17th. She kicked off her 2018 season with a third place finish at the Osaka Marathon, but most of her energy this summer has been focused on the track sharpening her speed over 5000m and 10,000m.

Madai Perez (MEX) is back after a successful run in 2017. A two-time Olympian in the marathon, announced her comeback last fall with a 2:24:44 fourth place finish in Chicago. She logged this time fourteen years after she made her marathon debut in Chicago, and 11 years after she ran her still-standing personal best in Chicago, 2:22:59. She is a national champion in the 10,000m (2003, 2010) and a silver medalist in the Pan American Games Marathon, (2011); she has also represented Mexico at the IAAF World Championships in both the marathon and half marathon.

Alexi Pappas (GRE) announced her debut on Instagram, writing “I’ve broken tape in Chicago * paced the 26.2 ‘ I’m coming back this October ‘ to chase what I dream to do: my MARATHON DEBUT!” Pappas, a 2016 Olympian (she holds dual Greek and American citizenship), is familiar with the energy and enthusiasm of Chicago’s running community.

She won the 2015 and 2016 Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K, but her first experience in Chicago was the 2014 Bank of America Chicago Marathon where she led a group of U.S. Olympic Trials hopefuls as a pacer. Pappas experienced an impressive Olympic debut performance in the 10,000m. She set the Greek national record and a new PR to finish 17th in 31:36.16.

Other notable athletes include Jessica Draskau Petersson (DEN) with a personal best of 2:30:07; Vianey De la Rosa (MEX) with a personal best of 2:32:01; Dayna Pidhoresky (CAN) with a personal best of 2:36:08; and Hiruni Wijayaratne (SRI) with a personal best of 2:36:35.

International women’s elite field

 

Name

Roza Dereje

Birhane Dibaba

Brigid Kosgei

Shure Demise

Yuka Ando

Madai Perez

Jessica Draskau Petersson

Vianey De la Rosa

Dayna Pidhoresky

Hiruni Wijayaratne

Melanie Myrand

Chirine Njeim

Alexi Pappas

Country

ETH

ETH

KEN

ETH

JPN

MEX

DEN

MEX

CAN

SRI

CAN

LBN

GRE

Personal best

2:19:17

2:19:51

2:20:13

2:20:59

2:21:36

2:22:59

2:30:07

2:32:01

2:36:08

2:36:35

2:39:07

2:39:21

Debut

Journalists interested in covering the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon can apply for media credentials now at ChicagoMarathon.com.

Source: Runnersweb.com

Out of the freezer, Into the frying Pan for Kawauchi at Gold Coast Marathon

A couple of months ago, as marathoners in the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games marathons battled sweltering conditions, Yuki Kawauchi ran to his first World Marathon Majors victory in Boston in wet, windy and freezing conditions.

This Sunday (1 July), Kawauchi is likely to face the rain again as he competes in the 40th edition of the Gold Coast marathon, an IAAF Gold Label event. But where runners experienced biting winds and slippery roads in Boston, mild and relatively still weather is forecast for race morning. It will be warm – with the temperature tipped to rise to just over 20C – but nothing like as hot as the Commonwealth marathoners experienced.

Kawauchi will be competing in his seventh straight Gold Coast marathon and chasing his second victory. His only win came in 2013, but he has three more podium finishes and has never finished outside the top eight.

Kawauchi will need to be on his A-game, however, as two other recent winners are in this year’s line-up – last year’s victor, Takuya Noguchi and race record holder and two-time winner Kenneth Mungara. Actually, there are at least five former winners starting in this 40th edition of the race – Eric Sigmont, winner of the inaugural race in 1979, and 1990 Commonwealth Games 5000 metres champion Andrew Lloyd, who won in 1980, are also in the field.

Takuya Noguchi prevails at the 2017 Gold Coast Marathon (organisers) © Copyright

 The women’s Gold Coast race offers the possibility of a home victory with two of Australia’s best distance performers at the Gold Coast Games among the chances. Jess Trengove was bronze medallist in the marathon and Celia Sullohern challenged for the medals in the 5000 and 10,000 metres. It probably reflects a pleasing internationalization of the race, but no Australian has won since Lauren Shelley took the women’s race in 2009 and no male Australian since Lee Troop in 2006.

Trengove has a best time of 2:27:01 in London last year and followed that up with ninth place in the London 2017 world championships. Sullohern finished sixth in last year’s Gold Coast race, slashing 20 minutes off her only previous performance, and then ran 2:29:27 to win the Melbourne marathon last November.

Abebech Afework, who set a race record 2:25:34 last year, is not back to defend her title. Fastest woman in the field is Agnes Barsosio (also known as Agnes Jeruto Kiprotich) with a 2:20:59 in Paris last year. Her recent form is solid, albeit less impressive, with a 1:11:00 half-marathon in Gothenburg in May. Ruth Jebitok, with a 2:25:49 from Barcelona this year, may stand a better chance of registering the first Kenyan women’s victory on the Gold Coast.

The Gold Coast race has been supported by many top Japanese runners over its history. The prodigious Kawauchi may be the highest-profile Japanese runner, but it is the women who have notched more race victories. Afework’s win in 2017 broke a run of five consecutive Japanese wins. Fastest Japanese entrant this year is Ayaka Fuijimoto (2:27:08 in Tokyo last year), followed by Miharu Shimokado (2:27:54 in Nagoya last year) and Mae Uesugi (2:31:49 in this year’s Tokyo race).

 Turning to the men’s race, the 44-year-old Mungara may feel the Gold Coast owes him a change of luck. He won in 2015 and 2016, the former in the race record and world 40-plus record of 2:08:42, and was thwarted in his bid for a hat-trick when Noguchi beat him narrowly last year in 2:08:59. Helped, no doubt, by his Gold Coast experience, he was selected for Kenya’s Commonwealth Games team but was one of those who wilted in the heat, finishing 10th in 2:25:42. His only other marathon for this year was a 2:13 in Hong Kong in January.

Fastest man on paper is Philip Sanga Kimutai, whose best of 2:06:07 dates back to 2011. He ran under 2:07 in each of the following two years and, while not as fast since, has run 2:10:07 or faster in three of the past four years. If time is passing him by, it is in no hurry.

Douglas Chebii and Michael Githae also will bear close watching. Chebii ran 2:08:43 earlier this year in Seville and Githae 2:09:21 in Lake Biwa. At 24 and 23, respectively, both are approaching their prime racing years.

Both the marathon and associated half-marathon are Oceania area championship races.

Trengove and Sullohern stand out as the top two contenders for the women’s marathon title with a big edge on times over any other entrant. The men’s race is a lot more open. Last year’s winner, Dave Ridley of New Zealand, is defending his title, but fastest Oceania man in the field is 40-year-old David Criniti of Australia (2:17:57), followed by London 2017 representative Jack Colreavy (2:18:32).

Collis Birmingham, Liam Adams and Dejen Gebreselassie should fight out the men’s half-marathon championship, though Jack Rayner is capable of a fast time based on his performances at shorter road distances.

Last year’s winner, Sara Hall, is back. As an American, Hall is not eligible for the Oceania title, nor is the other sub-1:10 entrant, Japan’s Hanae Tanaka. Laura Thweatt of the US, Sinead Diver and Ellie Pashley are next fastest, with the latter pair looking to have the Oceania title between them,

Kawauchi and Osako join Chicago Marathon field

Organisers of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon have announced that Boston Marathon champion Yuki Kawauchi and Japanese 5000m record-holder Suguru Osako will join the elite field for the IAAF Gold Label road race on 7 October.

They will both seek to become the first Chicago Marathon champion from Japan since Toshihiko Seko took the crown in 1986.

“Yuki and Suguru are exciting additions to our elite field,” said executive race director Carey Pinkowski. “Yuki has taken an unconventional path to marathon stardom; there’s no other elite runner competing today like him. And Suguru is young in his marathon career with a real chance at breaking the Japanese record in Chicago.”

Before becoming the Boston Marathon champion earlier this year amid freezing temperatures and pouring rain (where he said, “for me, these are the best conditions possible”), Kawauchi gained global recognition for his prolific racing schedule. He holds the record for the most marathons run within 2:20 (79), he boasts a PB of 2:08:14, he has won more than 30 career marathons and he finished 12 marathons in 2017 alone.

He has raced more than 20 times so far in 2018, including running the Kuki Half Marathon dressed in a panda suit and setting a course record at the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71km ultramarathon in May.

Compatriot Osako, who is based in Oregon, is the Japanese record-holder in the 3000m and 5000m. He competed in the 5000m and 10,000m at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio and made his marathon debut at the 2017 Boston Marathon, finishing third in 2:10:28. At the time, he was the first Japanese man to make it on to the podium in Boston since Seko’s 1987 victory. He ended 2017 with a 2:07:19 PB to finish third at the Fukuoka Marathon.

Osako hopes to secure an additional bonus in Chicago by breaking the Japanese marathon record of 2:06:11. If he manages that feat, the Japanese Corporate Track and Field Federation will pay him a 100-million-yen bonus.

“I want to try to break the national record, but the most important thing to me is to be competitive with the other runners,” said Osako. “I’m really excited and proud to run with Mo and Galen. I’m going to enjoy the challenge.”

Japan has a long history of producing some of the world’s best marathon runners, stretching back to the post-war era of the 1940s and 1950s. Japan dominated the global scene in the 1960s (in 1966 alone, 15 of the top 17 marathon times belonged to Japanese runners). As Tokyo looks ahead to hosting the 2020 Olympics, it hopes to see its marathon runners – like Osako – back in the medal count.

Kawauchi and Osako will be joined in Chicago by fellow Japanese runners Ryo Kiname, Chihiro Miyawaki, Tsukasa Koyama, Taku Fujimoto and Yohei Suzuki.

Kiptui wins the Stockholm marathon

Kenya’s Lawi Kiptanui won the 40th edition of the Stockholm marathon that was held on Saturday (2) in Stockholm, Sweden.

Kiptanui came to this race with a personal best of 2:13.21 that he got in Lyon in 2017 beat a strong  field that include Bazu Worku from Ethiopia who was the fastest runner on paer with a pb of 2:08.30 that he got early this year in Houston.

The25 year-old put on one of the most extraordinary victories in the history of the Stockholm Marathon when he led a 1-2-3 Kenyan podium finish as he cut the tape in 2:13.30 failing by three minutes to beat the course record of 2:10.58 that was set by fellow country-mate Stanley Kipchirchir Koech two years ago.

Lawi Kiptui and Yuki Kawauchi pose for a photo after winning the 2018 Stockholm marathon. Photo: Organisers

He aimed at 2.10 in Stockholm, but got “satisfied” with the victory. “It’s a bad city break. “I just focused on winning, it was a good race,” Kiptui said.

Kipkirui was followed a distant later by Dominic Kimwetich who crossed the line in 2:16.22 with Stephen Kiplimo closing the podium three in 2:17.01.

The 2018 Boston marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi from Japan could not the fire of the three Kenyans finishing in fourth place.

LEADING RESULTS

MEN

  1. Lawi Kiptui               (KEN) 2:13.30
  2. Dominic Kimwetich (KEN) 2:16.22
  3. Stephen Kiplimo       (KEN)  2:17.01

Kawauchi beats Kirui to Boston Marathon

Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi made sure that American dream of winning the Boston Marathon remain a dream when he defended his title at the 122nd edition of the Boston Marathon that was held on Monday (16) in Boston.

Kawauchi cut the tape in  2:15.54  and was followed by the World Marathon champion Geoffrey Kirui OF 2:18.21 with United State’s Shadrack Biwott closing the podium three in 2:18.32.

The last Japanese to win this race was Toshihiko Seko in 1987.

LEADING RESULTS
MEN

  1. Yuki Kawauchi    (JPN) 2:15.54
  2. Geoffrey Kirui     (KEN) 2:18.21
  3. Shadrack Biwott (USA) 2:18.32