Tag Archives: Wycliffe Kinyamal

Wyclife Kinyamal sets the record in 800m race at Continental Tour

After silencing Canada’s Marco Arop a week ago, Wyclife Kinyamal was it again and this time it was at the Kamila Skolimowska Memorial that was held on Sunday (5) in Silesia, Poland, a World Athletics Continental Tour Gold meeting.

On paper this race was favoring former world record holder for the indoor 600m champion Michael Saruni and the Tokyo Olympics bronze medallist Patryk Dobek from Poland but it seems Kinyamal had his secret card hidden under the table as he trounced the two crossing the line in anew Meet record of 1:44.63.

Poland’s Kacper Lewalski another unfavorite took the second place in a new personal best of 1:44.84 with European U23 silver medallist Champion Daniel Rowden from Great taking bronze in 1:44.89 after a powerful kick that denied his country mate Jake Weightman a podium finish. Weightman finished fourth in a seasonal best of 1.44.89.

Saruni the race favorite finished a distant fifth in 1:44.04.

LEADING RESULTS

800M MEN

  1. Wycliffe Kinyamal          (KEN) 1:44.63
  2. Kacper Lewalski              (POL)  1:44.84
  3. Daniel Rowden                 (GRT) 1:44.89
  4. Jake Weightman               (GRT) 1:44.97
  5. Michael Saruni                 (KEN) 1:44.04

World 3000m Steeplechase record holder takes on Chespol and Cherono in Brussels

World 3,000m steeplechase world record holder Beatrice Chepkoech will headline the Final Zurich Brussels Diamond League Meeting that will be held on Friday (31) in Brussels, Belgium.

The 27 year-old who became the first woman to break 8:50 and 8:45 will face off with with Africa silver medallist Celliphine Chespol and bronze medallist Fancy Cherono.

Other Kenyans on the start list are former world champion Hyving Kiyeng, Caroline Tuigong, Daisy Jepkemei and Norah Jeruto for company in the water jump event.

The Kenyans water champions will battle for the honors with World champion Emma Coburn of the United States and Commonwealth Games champion Aisha Praught of Jamaica.

Africa 1,500 meters champion Winny Chebet is lined up for the event, where she faces stern test from several world beaters including England’s Laura Muir and Laura Weightman, Netherlands’ Hassan Sifan and Gudaf Tsegay of Ethiopia.

Commonwealth Games 800m champion Wycliffe Kinyamal faces off with Africa silver medallist Emmanuel Korir, Ferguson Rotich, Cornelius Tuwei, with Marcin Lewadonski of Poland also in the mix.

KINYAMAL PIPS CONSESLUS, MANANGOI FOR TOP AWARD

The Commonwealth Games 800m gold medaslist Wycliffe Kinyamal beat Olympic and World champion Conseslus Kipruto and Commonwealth Games gold medalist Elijah Manangoi for the StarTimes/Sports Journalists Association of Kenya (SJAK) Sports Personality of the month of April, 2018.

The 21 year old emerging middle distance runner who stunned the world during 2018 event in Gold Coast, Australia becomes the tenth recipient of the monthly award.

In the vote by a panel of Sports Journalists, Kinyamal shook off stiff competition posed fellow athletes who included Conseslus Kipruto who won the 3000 metres steeplechase gold medal at the 2018 Commonwealth Games in a new Games Record.

The two lap runner also fended off opposition from World champion and Commonwealth Games 1500 metres gold medallist Elijah Manangoi.

Other nominees for the April award were boxer Christine Ongare who won a bronze, Kenya’s only medal outside track and field at the 2018 Commonwealth Games  and rally driver Manvir Baryan who became the first non-local to win the Rally of South Africa.

Kinyamal helped Kenya reclaim the 800m Commonwealth Games title after World Record holder David Rudisha was beaten to second place during the 2014 edition in Glasgow, Scotland.

His gold medal was the first for Kenya in the 2018 Commonwealth games.

A gold medalist at the 2016 East African Junior Athletics Championships in Dar Es Salaam Tanzania where he made his first impact in the 800m regionally, Kinyamal  took home a 42-inch digital television set and KSh100, 000 courtesy of StarTimes.

The fast rising athlete is affiliated to Global Sports Communication and is based in Kaptagat Uasin Gishu County.

An excited Kinyamal said he was surprised by the accolade which is his first.

“This surprise is truly an inspiration as I progress with my athletics career. Glasgow was a good outing for Team Kenya and for me winning Kenya’s first gold medal at the 2018 Commonwealth Games. I hope to deliver more medals for Kenya. Thank you SJAK and StarTimes for this award.” An elated Kinyamal added.

Kinyamal: ‘I Plan to run under 1:43 this Year’

While it is perhaps a little premature to speak of David Rudisha’s successor as the planet’s premier two-lap runner, especially as the two-time world and Olympic 800m champion and world 800m record holder is still only 29, it is inevitable an athlete will one day emerge to replace the Kenyan great.

In recent times several athletes have loomed as potential challengers to Rudisha’s long-held status. The 2017 IAAF Diamond League champion and 2012 Olympic silver medallist Nijel Amos of Botswana boasts strong credentials. World champion Pierre-Ambroise Bosse, the charismatic Frenchman, is another with a burgeoning profile but perhaps it is Commonwealth 800m champion and Shanghai Diamond League winner Wycliffe Kinyamal Kisasy* who is best equipped to take on the mantle.

ATHLETICS ROOTS IN THE HIGH JUMP

Just 20, the exciting but raw Kenyan boasts many similarities to Rudisha. The pair grew up just 11km apart in Narok County. Like Rudisha, Kinyamal is a Maasai and the duo both have a similar long, raking stride which eats up the ground with ease.

Yet Kisasy’s journey as one of the world’s most exciting 800m talents is a little less formulaic than most.

Born the fifth of six children, Kisasy’s father and three brothers share a passion for football, but the middle-distance star has no interest in kicking a ball. Instead, he started his sporting journey as a promising schoolboy high jumper.

Boasting a personal best of “around 2.00m” he finished in the top five in Kenyan national age-group championships before a comment from a friend in late-2015 that running might improve his high jump was to radically change the whole direction of his athletics career.

RAPID RISE

At the time based out of Keringet, he took up running and rapidly discovered a latent talent. After just a few months training he made his 800m debut, running 1:49 to win in Bondo in February 2016. Two months later he struck gold at the East African Regional Junior Championships in Tanzania – a victory which crystallised a belief his future may lie as a middle-distance runner.

“At that point I was still training on my own in Keringet (the base of world and Olympic 1500m champion Faith Kipyegon),” he explains. “I was very happy with the times I had run (over 800m) after only a few of months training.”

Despite his inexperience, in June 2016 he finished third at the Kenyan Junior Trials – and just one place shy of a place on the two-man Kenyan team for the World U20 Championships team – slashing his personal best by one second to record 1:46.8.

JOINS SANG’S CAMP

Clearly boasting a special talent, he was picked up by the athletics management agency Global Sports Communication and in early 2017 Kisasy moved from Keringet to Kaptagat to come under the influence of leading Kenyan Patrick Sang – a switch which has accelerated his meteoric development.

Wycliffe Kinyamal Kisasy winning Commonwealth 800m gold (Getty Images) © Copyright

“Since Patrick started coaching me my life has changed,” adds the softly-spoken Kinyamal, who in his spare time loves to sing to Maasai music. “When he asks me to do something, I have total faith in what he is telling me to do.”

Training largely on his own for track sessions, twice a week he joins Sang’s world-class long-distance training group for easy runs led by Olympic marathon champion and Kenyan running colossus Eliud Kipchoge.

“I have learned so much since training with them (the distance-running group),” he says. “They are a big motivation.

“Eliud offers regular advice. He tells me training is a struggle and that I need to work hard.”

Further progress came last year. On his seasonal debut in Nijmegen he ran a PB of 1:46.56. In his next outing, he scalped a further 0.89 from his lifetime best to place second in Hengelo.

INJURY FRUSTRATIONS IN 2017

His progression in 2017 was frustratingly stunted by a hamstring injury and he limped to sixth spot in the heats at the Kenyan World Championship Trials in Nairobi. The issue meant he missed two months of competitive action only to return in late August in Rovereto, Italy, where Kisasy made another giant leap forward in his fledgling career by taking victory in a stunning new personal best of 1:43.94.

“I followed the pacemaker and later (Antoine) Gakeme from Burundi,” he explains. “I moved to the front at 250m and started to push the pace. The time surprised me.”

Making his 2018 seasonal debut indoors in Dusseldorf, finishing second in 1:46.54, he also revealed another similarity to Rudisha – a lack of aptitude for running indoors.

“I found it hard running around the tight turns, because I am tall,” he explains.

A week-and-a-half later in the more familiar outdoor running environment he secured second spot at the Kenyan Commonwealth Games Trials, recording 1:44.72 – just 0.08 behind Jonathan Kitilit – to book his ticket on the Kenyan team for Gold Coast.

All smiles – Wycliffe Kinyamal Kisasy after winning the Commonwealth 800m title (Getty Images) © Copyright

In Australia, Kisasy backed up his raw talent to reveal genuine championship pedigree – the mark of any great champion. In the final, he hit the bell in third before making his winning move and kicking past the fading 2014 Commonwealth champion Nijel Amos at 250m.

Holding a significant advantage down much of the home stretch he repelled a blistering late charge from Englishman Kyle Langford to clinch gold by 0.05 in 1:45.11.

Aiming to win “any medal” before the Games to take victory was the icing on the cake.

“Winning gold has given me a lot of confidence,” he says. “My career ambition now is to do a lot more in the future. I am still young and I need to do more at the 2019 World Championships (in Doha) and 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.”

AMBITIOUS 2018 GOALS

His Diamond League debut in Shanghai offered further evidence of his gifts. Edging a titanic tussle from Kitilit in a personal best time 1:43.91 he sent another thunderous statement to the 800m running world that he could be the man to beat for the rest of this season.

“I feel I have good speed-endurance and I plan to run under 1:43 this year,” he explains of his qualities and future plans for 2018.

Aged just 20 and with a little over 20 competitive 800m races in his life his best is clearly yet to come. Meanwhile, working under the astute and often patient stewardship of Sang is another positive sign.

Which brings us to one final question: does Kisasy have any plans to return to the high jump?

“No,” he says with a smile. “I have left the high jump in the past back in Kenya.” And after his dazzling transition into the 800m who could blame him.

*Note: he previously appeared as Wycliffe Kinyamal, without his surname Kisasy

Wycliffe Kinyamal bags first gold for Kenya

Kenay has finally won its first gold at the commonwealth games when Wycliffe Kinyamal cross the line in 1:45.11 to take gold that the country has been waiting for since the games began.

Kinyama was closesly followed by Kyle Langford from England who crossed the line in personal best four seconds later with Luke Mathews closing the first three in season best of 1:45.60

Another Kenyan Jonathan Kitilit finished a distant sixth in 1:46.12

The race favorite Nijel Amos from Botswana who came with a season best of 1:43.18 finished a disappointing last in 1:48.45