Tag Archives: World Athletics

Kenya Government Declares full scale War on Doping

The Kenyan Government has moved in with speed on the fight against doping after the leniency by the World Athletics Council of not suspending the country from active athletics events.

The Cabinet Secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and Arts Ababu Namwamba, said the government wants the resources it deploys to the Athletics Kenya and the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK) for testing, investigating and enforcement issues across the spectrum be used in taking decisive action against doping.

The Cabinet Secretary who was addressing the media at the at Maktaba House on Thursday, thanked the World Athletics and Athletics Integrity Unit for allowing Kenya the chance to freely race and participate in international events.

“We want to bring in all the stake holders that include the public, athletes, coaches, agents, managers and athletes’ managements to fight this war which we will win by all means. We will also partner with investigative and Judicial agencies, so that they can prosecute and jail the culprits. This a war we must win and we will,” said Ababu.

Accompanied the CS during the presser were Athletics Kenya President, Jack Tuwei, Athletics Kenya Chief Administrative Officer, Susan Kamau, Athletes Representative, Milcah Chemos with athletes Mary Moraa, Maximillla Imali and Dan Kiviasi.

This announcement follows what the World Athletics said yesterday that they have let Kenya be but they will be closely watching the country.

‘World Athletics has been concerned,’ said Sebastian Coe. ‘Kenya has been on the watch list for a few years already.

The World Athletics president who was speaking in Rome said, “In one year 40 per cent of all the positive tests in global athletics have been in Kenya and this is not a situation that World Athletics was prepared to sit and watch develop”.

The country has been in panic for the last few weeks that they would be blacklisted in the style of Russia by World Athletics, given that the country has 55 athletes who are serving the doping bans.

World Athletics Council: Forty percent of Global Dopers are from Kenya

The World Athletics Council spared Kenya from being banned from active competitions by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) due to rampant doping problem in the country.

World Athletics President Seb Coe said reports about a possible full-scale ban for the country were misguided, and that increased funding and vigilance from the Kenyan government and the pledge of investing $5 million per year into anti-doping efforts over the next five years, persuaded authorities to stop short of the most radical sanctions.

‘World Athletics has been concerned,’ said Coe. ‘Kenya has been on the watch list for a few years already.

The country has been in panic for the last few weeks that they would be blacklisted in the style of Russia by World Athletics, given that the country has 55 athletes who are serving the doping bans.

The World Athletics president who was speaking in Rome said, “In one year 40 per cent of all the positive tests in global athletics have been in Kenya and this is not a situation that World Athletics was prepared to sit and watch develop.”

Athletics Integrity Unit Chairman David Howman (right) and AIU Head Brett Clothier addressing the World Athletics Council meeting in Rome, Italy. Photo: AIU

All stakeholders internationally and domestically are now aligned to resolve this situation and I am pleased we have a united response. But my instinct tells me it will be a long journey.’ He said.

Kenya is among four countries included in Category A – member federations the World Athletics believe are most likely to have doping problems – along with Ethiopia, Belarus, hosts of next year’s European Games, and Ukraine and this has subjected its athletes to increased testing in the last ten months leading up to a major event to be eligible. “I know the Kenyan government feels this has been a disfiguring period in what should have been a Herculean period for Kenyan athletics,” Coe said. “But I’m really delighted, because actually, all the stakeholders that matter, both domestically and internationally, are now aligned in coming together to really do everything we can to resolve this situation.”

Russia’s doping suspension will be lifted week

Russian athletics chiefs are hopeful that their global ban for doping will be lifted, sources in the country have told the Daily Mail.

World Athletics are due to discuss the prospect of removing the Russian federation’s suspension, which has stood since 2015, at a meeting of the ruling body’s council in Rome.

The Russian Athletics Federation has worked hard to get its house in order since a systemic doping regime was revealed amongst its athletes.

And, though Russian athletes will remain banned from representing the country as a result of the war on Ukraine, their ruling body could be welcomed back into the fold.

World Athletics, whose president is Seb Coe, imposed the eight-year ban after a damning investigation by the World Anti-Doping Agency revealed the scale of Russian drug-taking.

The huge, state-sponsored regime sabotaged London 2012 and, according to the investigative report, included ‘cover ups, destruction of samples [and] payment of money to conceal doping tests’.

The Russian federation was hit with further sanctions in 2020, including a $10million fine, after the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) found senior individuals had conspired to break anti-doping rules.

In a separate WADA case, its investigators found that data from a Moscow anti-doping laboratory had been tampered with. It meant the Russian anti-doping agency remained suspended, a sanction which will be reviewed next month.

Only 10 Russian athletes, meanwhile, were allowed to compete as ‘Authorised Neutral Athletes’ at last year’s Tokyo Olympics.

However, the Russian federation is now confident that the corrupt individuals have been weeded out and its system is compliant with anti-doping regulations.

Rune Andersen, the independent chairman of the Russian taskforce, was due to deliver a report to the World Athletics council updating them on this progress.

The council began its two-day meeting in the Italian capital on Tuesday. They were also due to discuss the spate of doping sanctions levelled against Kenyan athletes, amid reports that their national federation could be at risk of a suspension.

However, the Kenyan government last week pledged $5million to fight doping after Brett Clothier, the head of the AIU, said increasing resources was ‘where this fight goes next’.

Coe is entering the final year of his second term as World Athletics president and will need to decide shortly whether to run for office again. He has been linked with the presidency of the International Olympic Committee, with Thomas Bach’s second term coming to an end in 2025.

Asafa Powell hangs his running shoes

Jamaican Asafa Powell, who held the men’s 100m world record before Usain Bolt, has retired from track and field.

Powell held a 40th birthday and retirement party on Wednesday. Bolt filmed a video to wish his countryman well upon retirement.

Powell last raced in May 2021, according to World Athletics, and did not compete at Jamaica’s Olympic Trials last year.

He raced at the Olympics in 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016, earning 4x100m relay gold in Rio. His best individual finish was fifth in the 100m in 2004 and 2008.

Powell owns the record of 97 career sub-10-second 100m performances, the last coming on Sept. 1, 2016.

Powell lowered the 100m world record to 9.77 seconds on June 14, 2005. He held the mark until Bolt broke it on May 31, 2008, for the first of three times. He is the fastest man in history without an Olympic or world 100m title.

In 2004, Powell had the fastest semifinal time at the Athens Games, then placed fifth in the final won by Justin Gatlin.

In 2008, after injuries early in the year, Powell had the second-fastest semifinal time in Beijing. He placed fifth in the Olympic final again.

In 2012, Powell pulled up in the 100m final and was the last finisher. In 2016, he made the Jamaican Olympic team strictly for the relay.

Powell is the fourth-fastest man in history with a personal best of 9.72 seconds, trailing contemporaries Bolt (9.58), Tyson Gay (9.69) and Yohan Blake (9.69).

Bolt retired in 2017. Gay, also 40, last raced in May 2021. Blake, 32, ran 9.85 in June, his best time since 2012, when he took Olympic 100m and 200m silver behind Bolt.

Do not Ban Us; Kenyan Government asks World Athletics

The Kenyans government has  written to the World Athletics asking it not to ban the country from the as they seek to clean up the mess that has been created by few rotten individuals who have placed the country in the bad light by their doping menace as it intensifies to clean the entire sport.

The Cabinet Secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and the Arts, Ababu Namwamba, spoke through a press release saying, “We cannot allow our nation to be banned because of the actions of some greedy unethical individuals.”.

“We will target and deal decisively with the criminals and their syndicates. We must work together to eradicate doping and cheating from athletics and sports in general.” Said Namwamba.

The government has told the governing body that it has committed an annual amount of $5 million over the next five years for the fight against doping, the Daily Nation newspaper reported.

It is also taking “firm measures” and had a commitment of “zero tolerance” towards doping, he said.

Fifty-five Kenyan athletes are currently banned and eight provisionally suspended, according to the data from the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU).

The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) now World Athletics included the distance-running superpower on a list of nations most at risk of doping in July 2018. It came as part of new regulations by the WA Council put more responsibility on National Federations to deal with the problem. Kenya is among four countries included in Category A – member federations the World Athletics believe are most likely to have doping problems – along with Ethiopia, Belarus, hosts of next year’s European Games, and Ukraine.

The AIU has that they have received an email from the Cabinet Secretary but they are yet to respond to it as they await full communication from the Monaco meeting that will be held on Tuesday next week.

Kenya might be banned tomorrow by World Athletics

Kenya might be suspended from ALL Athletics activities tomorrow (Friday, 25) by the World Athletics (WA) and Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) due to that rampant doping cases that have engulfed the country this year by Kenyan runners.

Our source a senior official at Athletics Kenya, on condition of anonymity request told Athletics.co.ke, “From where I seat and the information am getting directly from AIU top officials, it’s a done case.” We are at their mercies as from now and we should prepare ourselves for the worse which is being suspended for a minimum of two years or a maximum of three years, so that we can put our house in order,” he said.

The senior official said that there are many top elite athletes that AIU is on their radar and soon they will be unmasked and this will be the end of their running careers.

“Many athletes and the country at large will be affected and it will be an expensive affair that will cost jobs and many lives will be affected directly and indirectly,” he said.

This year alone the country has had 17 athletes sanctioned by AIU for a range of doping violations with eight athletes currently on provisional suspensions, with the outcomes of their cases pending.

The newly appointed cabinet secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and the Arts, Ababu Namwamba, has been vocal on the intentions that government is going to take in the fight against the doping menace, “We are going to criminalise doping to levels you cannot imagine. We are going to be very, very harsh.

Ten Kenya athletes have tested positive since last year, for a banned substance called triamcinolone Acetonide, while two others from other nations tested positive for the same substance.

“It is a synthetic corticosteroid medication administered through injection into joints to treat various joint conditions. It is also used topically to treat various skin conditions, such as relieving the discomfort of mouth sores,” he said.

The late Athletics Kenya president Isaiah Kiplagat in 2015, suspended Rosa Associati management stable run by Dr. Gabrielle Rosa and Gerard Van de Veen of Volare Sports.

Athletes who have been banned at Rosa stable include, three-time Boston marathon winner Rita Jeptoo, two-time world champion Asbel Kiprop and the 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong while at Volare Sports include Wilson Kipsang.

The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) now World Athletics included the distance-running superpower on a list of nations most at risk of doping in July 2018.

It came as part of new regulations by the WA Council put more responsibility on National Federations to deal with the problem.

Kenya is among four countries included in Category A – member federations the World Athletics believe are most likely to have doping problems – along with Ethiopia, Belarus, hosts of next year’s European Games, and Ukraine.

Athletics Kenya staring a ban

Athletics Kenya, athletes and athletic fans will be waiting patiently when World Athletics (WA) and Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) will be making an announcement whether Kenya will be struck off from competing in international events next season due to rampant doping cases reported by Kenyan runners.

With alarming doping cases reported in the country with top brass athletes, from track to field and road running, the country may face suspension or a ban for a period of time in order to put their house in order.

Our source, on anonymity request told Athletics.co.ke said: “ From the look of things its just a matter of when, because where we are now is at a danger zone. We may be suspended by AIU this year and this week might be the much awaited announcement. We pray that we be given time because of the efforts we and the Govrnment have put in to fight this menance,” he said.

He said that there are many top elite athletes that AIU is on their radar and soon they will be unmasked and this will be the end of their running careers.

“Many athletes and the country at large will be affected and it will be an expensive affair that will cost jobs and many lives will be affected directly and indirectly,” he said.

This year alone the country has had 17 athletes sanctioned by AIU for a range of doping violations with eight athletes currently on provisional suspensions, with the outcomes of their cases pending.

The newly appointed cabinet secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and the Arts, Ababu Namwamba, has been vocal on the intentions that government is going to take in the fight against the doping menace, “We are going to criminalise doping to levels you cannot imagine. We are going to be very, very harsh.

Ten Kenya athletes have tested positive since last year, for a banned substance called triamcinolone Acetonide, while two others from other nations tested positive for the same substance.

“It is a synthetic corticosteroid medication administered through injection into joints to treat various joint conditions. It is also used topically to treat various skin conditions, such as relieving the discomfort of mouth sores,” he said.

Senate majority leader Aron Cheruiyot is proposing a stringent measure to curb doping menace in the country to ensure that Kenyans run clean and regain the global reputation the country has been enjoying.

“Doping is one of the biggest issues that the new CS has to deal with, the fact that we reach a point where all our athletes will be screened more thoroughly than anybody else in the world. It is very terrible because it means that the glory that Kenya has enjoyed will be put in question and doubt because the world will see us as good at doping. That is really unfortunate,” said Cheruiyot.

The late Athletics Kenya president Isaiah Kiplagat in 2015, suspended Rosa Associati management stable run by Dr. Gabrielle Rosa and Gerard Van de Veen of Volare Sports.

Athletes who have been banned at Rosa stable include, three-time Boston marathon winner Rita Jeptoo, two-time world champion Asbel Kiprop and the 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong while at Volare Sports include Wilson Kipsang.

He said that the CS should also take on the agents in the country who are misleading young athletes by trying to show them the easier way into the global stage yet it is known that there are no easier routes to success and one has to sweat it out.
“As a country, we must re-register afresh these agents. Those that have been found to have athletes that have doped must be banned from this country because those are the people responsible for the mess that we find ourselves in,” he said.

Russia reinstatement at this month’s World Athletics Council meeting unlikely

Yuri Borzakovsky, sports director of the Russian Athletics Federation (RusAF), has expressed the hope that his organisation will be re-admitted to international competition by World Athletics at its Council meeting from November 29 to 30.

The RusAF was stripped of its membership in November 2015 amid a high-profile doping scandal in Russian athletics.

In December of the same year, a taskforce, led by the Norwegian Rune Andersen, was created by World Athletics and has been monitoring the implementation of the RusAF recovery plan ever since.

This work has continued even after World Athletics ruled on March 1 that Russian and Belarusian athletes would be banned from competition “for the foreseeable future” in the wake of the invasion of Ukraine.

“It is not yet clear what will happen next,” Borzakovsy, the Athens 2004 Olympic 800m champion and former RusAF head coach, told Express-Sport newspaper.

“We are talking about restoring the membership of our federation in World Athletics.

“This issue will be considered at the Council meeting at the end of the month.

“I really hope that we will return to our big Olympic family.”

Asked by insidethegames for a statement, World Athletics responded: “The chair of the Russia Taskforce, Rune Andersen, will report on the progress of the reinstatement process at the World Athletics Council meeting on November 29-30 as usual.

“The Council will discuss the recommendations in his report as usual and any decisions will be announced at the press conference after the meeting.”

Yuri Borzakovsky hopes the ban on Russian competitors will be lifted at this month’s World Athletics meeting ©Getty Images

It is understood, however, that while the reinstatement process may be making steady headway, a restoration of the RusAF will not be possible while Russia’s invasion of Ukraine persists.

“It’s hard for the guys, you won’t envy them here, because they can’t realise themselves on the world stage,” Borzakovsky added.

“They were allowed to compete only in a neutral status, their last big performance was in Tokyo in 2021 at the Olympic Games, before this started at the World Championships.

“Yes, in a neutral status they compete without a flag, but everyone knows perfectly well what country they are from, everyone knows that they are Russians.

“Athletes already live in these realities, it is still difficult for athletes of other sports to accept such conditions.

“In any case, you need to continue to train, compete, while inside the country, and if possible, then abroad.

“At the same time, you need to be ready to go out at any time to the international arena and show yourself.

“It will all depend on whether the membership of our federation is restored or not.”

“The world is horrified by what Russia has done, aided and abetted by Belarus,” World Athletics President Sebastian Coe said when athletes from the two countries were banned ©Getty Images

While some Russian competitors were previously able to compete internationally as Authorised Neutral Athletes, having undergone statutory anti-doping tests, even they were precluded from international competition by World Athletics on March 1 because of the war in Ukraine.

World Athletics’ stance in is line with a recommendation from the International Olympic Committee and mirrored across most international sport.

“The world is horrified by what Russia has done, aided and abetted by Belarus,” World Athletics President Sebastian Coe said in March.

“World leaders sought to avoid this invasion through diplomatic means but to no avail given Russia’s unswerving intention to invade Ukraine.

“The unprecedented sanctions that are being imposed on Russia and Belarus by countries and industries all over the world appear to be the only peaceful way to disrupt and disable Russia’s current intentions and restore peace.

“Anyone who knows me will understand that imposing sanctions on athletes because of the actions of their Government goes against the grain.

“This is different as Governments, businesses and other international organisations have imposed sanctions and measures against Russia across all sectors.

“Sport has to step up and join these efforts to end this war and restore peace.

“We cannot and should not sit this one out.”

World Athletics Launches Champions for A Better World

World Athletics has announced its inaugural group of ‘Champions for a Better World’ to lend their voices to sustainability campaigning within the sport.

Under the organisation’s Athletics for a Better World initiative, the Champions for a Better World will advocate for more sustainable practices across athletics and encourage other athletes to take a more active role in addressing their environmental concerns.

The announcement comes as world leaders prepare to gather at the COP27 UN Climate Change Conference and alongside compelling new data, which reveals that more than 76% of athletes are seriously concerned or very concerned about climate change, with over 66% feeling impacted directly by its effects.

Seven in ten (72%) believe climate change has already impacted athletics directly. Finally, 90% said that World Athletics does have a role to play in addressing sustainability in the sport. The survey was carried out at four different World Athletics championship events in 2022, with 737 athletes across 122 countries giving responses.

The nine Champions for a Better World hail from Brazil, Australia, the USA, the Philippines, Burkina Faso, Italy, Switzerland, New Zealand and Nigeria, and compete in events across the athletics landscape.

The athletes have been recruited to support World Athletics’ efforts to reduce the sport’s environmental impact in alignment with the World Athletics Sustainability Strategy.

The strategy aims to make the organisation carbon neutral by 2030 and to provide a pathway for member federations and licensed competitions to achieve net zero emissions by 2040.

The strategy also encourages athletes to take a more active role in promoting sustainability and aims to provide support to have their voices heard.

World Athletics President Sebastian Coe said: “It’s clear that an overwhelming majority of our athletes are very concerned about the impacts that climate change is having on their lives and on our sport.

It’s critical for us to act on those concerns, to put practical applications in place where we can, and to drive the sport forward with the advocacy and the high-profile voices that athletes can bring.”

The Champions for a Better World initiative follows a string of actions by World Athletics to raise awareness about the effects of environmental change on the sport.

Earlier this year the organisation launched its powerful Every Breath Counts campaign, which urged people around the world to sign a Declaration for Clean Air. In a recent athlete survey, more than 70% of athletes expressed their concerns about air pollution.

In addition to highlighting concerns that athletes have about climate change, the results show an overwhelming appetite for change among athletes, with more than 77% of respondents saying they are willing to change their lifestyle to reduce the damage their activities cause to the environment. 84% said they already recycled frequently, while 71% claimed they mostly avoided using single-use plastic.

The inaugural Champions for a Better World:

  • Tobi Amusan, Nigeria – 100m hurdles – world record holder, 2022 world champion
  • Kelsey-Lee Barber, Australia – javelin – 2019 and 2022 world champion
  • Ajla Del Ponte, Switzerland – sprints – 2021 European indoor 60m champion, 2022 Olympic 100m finalist
  • Alison Dos Santos, Brazil – 400m hurdles – 2022 world champion, 2021 Olympic bronze medallist
  • Sam Mattis, USA – discus – 2021 Olympic and 2022 World Championships finalist
  • Eliza McCartney, New Zealand – pole vault – 2016 Olympic bronze medallist
  • Ernest John Obiena, Philippines – pole vault – 2022 world bronze medallist
  • Elena Vallortigara, Italy – high jump – 2022 world bronze medallist
  • Hugues Fabrice Zango, Burkina Faso – triple jump – world indoor record-holder, 2022 world silver medallist, 2021 Olympic bronze medallist

 

Alison Dos Santos, Brazil’s 400m hurdles world champion and 2021 Olympic bronze medallist, said: “As athletes, we have the important mission of raising awareness about the need to take care of the environment, both at a social and economic level.

We [athletes] nowadays have a precious platform to speak to the people who follow the sport and raise awareness. Being able to influence others is very gratifying to me. I am very happy and enthusiastic about embracing this challenge.”

New Zealand’s Eliza McCartney, 2016 Olympic pole vault bronze medallist, said: “We can see that climate change is already affecting sport. We have seen extreme temperatures, extreme storm events, and air pollution.

All of these things are very obvious in athletics, that you can see the change and how it’s affecting the training and competition of athletes. So it’s critical for us to step up and have our voices heard and say what we think needs to be done and be part of the solutions.”

Elena Vallortigara from Italy, 2022 world bronze medallist in the high jump, said: “The life of an athlete is anything but moderate. We travel a lot, need to change our gear often because it soon [loses its performance], and so on. I think becoming more aware and paying more attention to our choices is very important.

Kelsey-Lee Barber, Australia’s two-time world champion in the javelin, said: “Athletics is a big community. And as a community, we have a duty to one another to help educate and take action on matters of environmental, social and economic sustainability.

As an athlete, my goal in sport is not only about my personal success. A big part of my why is to encourage others, be a role model, and to lead by example.”

Sam Mattis, USA’s world and Olympic discus finalist, said: “Sport can be a powerful force for good, and through sustainability and justice initiatives we can set a powerful example for the world to follow. Change doesn’t happen without each and every one of us. Change won’t happen until all of us come together and demand it.”

Ernest John Obiena from the Philippines, the 2022 world bronze medallist in the pole vault, said: “The power of sport is truly immense.

We have a huge following and a big influence on society and I truly believe we should capitalise on this to make sure that people are informed across the world about the current issues and solutions that we have.”

Video messages from each athlete will be shared on World Athletics’ social media channels over the next two weeks.

Sourec: sustainhealth.fit

Fred Kerley eyes Usain Bolt’s world record

Fred Kerley soaks up the Floridian sun while collecting handfuls of home-grown okra and green chillies. Kerley cherises his vegetables,  which represent the American’s unique mentality both on and off the track.

His passion for gardening has also fortified his willingness to trust long periods of cultivation will produce great rewards, often against the odds.

A blazing 9.86-second 100m final in Eugene this summer confirmed Kerley’s status as the sport’s new sprint king. with Olympic champion Marcell Jacobs’ season scuppered by injuries.

Kerley’s hours spent in the garden have proven fundamental to his pursuit of running 100m faster than any man before. The almost mythical figure of Usain Bolt may yet prove illusive, but there is suddenly a stunning conviction in Kerley’s eyes as he vows to break the Jamaican’s world record of 9.58 seconds.

“It’s very realistic,” Kerley passionately declares to The Independent. “Everything is realistic; Bolt, Wayde [Van Niekerk], and all of the American greats. They put the bar up there for us to do it. UK inflation rises back to 40-year high of 10.1% as food prices soar

“If they can do it, then why not us? I’ve got to continue to train right, eat right, sleep right. These small things will help me to get to the bigger goals down the line. The records and that double gold.

“I speak to him [Bolt] on social media. But we don’t talk about records. He put the bar up there for us to go and attack it. He’s got the bar, we’re just trying to get there.”

From adoption as a child by his aunt Virginia, with his father in jail and mother absent, Kerley was among 13 kids crammed into a bedroom and left to sleep on pallets in San Antonio, Texas. Hardened by immense adversity, Kerley has rarely wavered on the path to greatness since. There were sceptics when the 100m shine lured him away from a blossoming 400m career, which has already included a bronze medal at the World Championships.

Kerley broke the 9.8 barrier this year, underlining his prowess after collecting silver in Tokyo to complete a stunning maiden season in the event. That mark has proven daunting to sprinters since the Bolt era, but Kerley swiftly rattled off three successive runs beneath the threshold, including a new lifetime best of 9.76 – establishing himself as the sixth fastest man in history.

Kerley is determined to “change the game forever”, with simple bounding exercises on high school football pitches the preliminary work on the road to the Budapest World Championships. The enormity of his goals make the tranquililty of his garden even more important.

“Gardening is peace,” Kerley says. “You see all the different colours in the garden. Once I get out of training I don’t talk about track at all. Track is not who Fred Kerley is, track is what Fred Kerley do. So I really enjoy the gardening, it allows me to take my mind off the negativity around stuff. It lets me leave track alone and focus on a different aspect of life.

“Gardening is like track and field in a way, if you’re not patient you’re just open up. That’s what gardening is, you have to be patient.”

After beating compatriots Marvin Bracy and Trayvon Bromell in Eugene to deliver a first American clean sweep on the podium since Carl Lewis, Leroy Burrell and Dennis Mitchell in 1991, Kerley emphasises the importance of his “brotherhood”.

“We’re all trying to one-up each other. We try to touch the stars. We talk every day, we have times we all want to achieve, we are trying to touch the stars.”

His words carry extra weight after British sprinter CJ Ujah was cleared last week of deliberately taking banned drugs at the Tokyo Olympics, despite a 22-month ban confirmed. The Team GB star referenced Kerley as a mentor, telling the Guardian that they “talk all the time” and even spoke on FaceTime. And Kerley was pleased to see Ujah emboldened by the verdict after a torrid year.

“I come from a place where people doubted people, but me personally, I want the best for everybody,” Kerley explained. “I want him to now look forward with life, even if people doubt him. At the end of the day s*** happens.

“I want him to now reach everything that people said he can’t reach. I’m a competitor, so whoever is out there on the track, I’m ready to compete.”

Just as Kerley shows his softer side, an abrupt reminder of his competitive edge arrives after being reminded of his glaring omission from World Athletics’ male athlete of the year nominees.

 

Source: independent.co.uk