Tag Archives: WA

Elijah Manangoi Completes his two years Ban

The 2017 World 1500m champion, Elijah Manangoi will be free (from today midnight Dec 22) to compete after serving his two years ban for “whereabouts failures” that was imposed on him by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU).

The 28 years old was provisionally suspended after missing three tests from July 2019 to December 2019. The three missed tests in a 12-month span led to his suspension of two years which forced him not to defend his world title in 2019.

Manangoi is the 2015 World Champion silver medallist, 2018 Commonwealth Games gold medallist and he is also the 2018 African 1500m Champion.

Manangoi was cited as one of the Top 100 most influential Africans by New African magazine in 2017

The AIU was established by International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) now World Athletics (WA) in 2017, has managed to conclusively handle over 250 doping cases with Kenya among those countries with most banned athletes.

Where to Watch the World Athlete of the Year Award Ceremony

World Athletics (WA) will be holding the World Athlete of the Year ceremony today Wednesday 1 December from 6pm CET (GMT+1).

The ceremony will be streamed live across the world through the World Athletics YouTube channel and the Facebook page.

The live event will be hosted by marathon great Paula Radcliffe and long jump star Jazmin Sawyers.

Two times Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge and Two times Olympic 1500m champion Faith Kipyegon are the two Kenyans who have made it to the finals.

Below are the two WA live channels:

Twitter handle:

https://twitter.com/WorldAthletics

Facebook handle:

https://web.facebook.com/WorldAthletics

 

Road Kings Kitwara, Oloititip , Kabuu Complete Doping Ban Race

Sammy Kitwara and Nicholas Kosgei are some of the Kenyan athletes who have completed their doping ban after serving their term that was imposed by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU).

AIU, the body established by by International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) now World Athletics (WA) in 2017, has managed to conclusively handle 250 doping cases with Kenya among those countries with most banned athletes.

Kitwara, who was banned for anti-doping rule violations with the presence of a Prohibited Substance (Terbutaline) (Article 2.1) was handed 16 months since 17 March 2019 that was completed just as Kosgei, who was banned when he was tested positive for Prohibited Substance (Prednisone) (Article 2.1), 16 months ineligibility from 2 February 2020.

The first Kenya elite athlete to fall under the shock of AIU was 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Jelagat Sumgong in April 2017 and so far AIU has banned 36 Kenyans.

Sumgong, Mercy Jerotich Kibarus and Salome Jerono Biwott were handed the longest banned period for eight years.

Among the thirty-six elite athletes, ten have so far served their full banning sentence and are free to engage in participating in any race in the world.

Two other athletes; Alfred Kipketer and Benjamin Ngandu Ndegwa will have their ban end by the end of this month (November).

Two cases are still at the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) as they are yet to be determined. The athletes, Joyce Chepkirui and Daniel Kinyua Wanjiru have appealed their sentencing.

 Below is the list:  

  1. Suleiman Kipse Simotwo,  Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone) (Article 2.1) 4 years ineligibility from 14 July 2017.
     
  2. Eliud Magut Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone) (Article 2.1), 4 years ineligibility from 14 July 2017.
  1. Lucy Kabuu Wangui, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Morphine) (Article 2.1) Use of a Prohibited Substance/Method (Morphine) (Article 2.2), 2 years ineligibility from 1 August 2018.
     
  2. Samson Mungai Kagia, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (methylprednisolone) (Article 2.1) Use of a Prohibited Substance/Method (methylprednisolone) (Article 2.2), 2 years ineligibility from 14 October 2018.
  1. Hilary Kepkosgei Yego, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone) (Article 2.1), 4 years ineligibility from 27 April 2017: 
  1. Sammy Kitwara, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Terbutaline) (Article 2.1),  16 months ineligibility from 17 March 2019.
  1. Alex Korio Oliotiptip, Whereabouts Failures (Article 2.4), 2 years ineligibility from 19 July 2019.
  1. Philip Cheruiyot Kangogo, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Higenamine) (Article 2.1) Use of a prohibited Substance (Article 2.2), 2 years ineligibility from 31 July 2019.
  1. James Mwangi Wangari, Presence / Use of a Prohibited Substance (Testosterone) (Article 2.1and Article 2.2), 4 years ineligibility from 19 March 2017 DQ results from 19 March 2017.
  1. Nicholas Kiptoo Kosgei, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Prednisone) (Article 2.1), 16 months ineligibility from 2 February 2020.
  1. Alfred Kipketer, Whereabouts Failures (Article 2.4), 2 years ineligibility from 26 November 2019.
  1. Benjamin Ngandu Ndegwa, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Nandrolone) (Article 2.1), 4 years ineligibility from 17 November 2017: DQ results: 6 June 2015 to 17 November 2017 

Ferdinand Omanyala introduces the man behind his successes

Africa’s fastest man Ferdinand Omurwa Omanyala has revealed the man behind his recent success. The National Record holder, took the title of the eight fastest man in the world in 100m after thrashing Akani Simbine’s African record at the 2nd edition of the Kip Keino Classic in that was held in September this year.

Omanyala has decided to reveal the details of his top-rated foreign manager, who also doubles up as his coach. Through his social media page, Omanyala stated that Marcel Viljoen is the man who has been pushing him to the limits.

“Despite the numerous challenges, we have truly enjoyed some incredible highlights this year. From an intense training camp in South Africa, to the Athletics Kenya Olympic trials, to the Tokyo milestones European breakthroughs, and finally, the big finish on home soil, giving me the title of the fastest man in Africa!” he praised his manager.

Marcel is an accredited Athlete Representative by World Athletics (WA) and is the founder of Fitness From Africa which is based in South Africa and has over 25 years of coaching experience.

Ferdinand Omanyala and his Manager Marcel Viljoen During Past Training Session. PHOTO: Ferdinand Omanyala

Apart from managing Omanyala, he has two more athletes under his label such as Jacent Nyamahunge from Uganda and Galaletsang Ramorwa of Russia.

Before Omanyala picked Marcel, he was under Coach Duncan Ayiemba before he was sanctioned with a 14-month ban by the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK).

manyala’s decision to introduce his coach comes just days after his sponsor pull out. Sports management company, DBA Africa, decided to terminate the contract with the athlete owing to different value sets represented by each faction.

“We are proud to have played a huge role in enabling him to compete around the continent resulting in attaining four qualifying times for the Tokyo Olympic Games and achieving many national records and personal best,” read part of the statement.

Two days later SNOLegal Sports & Entertainment Law announced their withdrawal of legal and advisory services offered to Omanyala.

Despite the double loss, Omanyala has maintained his silence on his next move.

Namibian sprinters resurrect ‘paradox’ of DSD rules

The presence of Namibian teenagers Beatrice Masilingi and Christine Mboma in the Olympic women’s 200 metres final weeks after they were banned from the 400m due to excess levels of testosterone has reopened the debate about DSD athletes.

The two 18-year-olds are the latest to fall foul of the rules regarding female athletes with Differences of Sexual Development (DSD) after more than a decade of the sport’s authorities wrestling with the issue.

A DSD or intersex athlete is broadly described as one who has XY sex chromosomes, has a blood testosterone level in the male range and has the ability to use testosterone circulating within their bodies.

World Athletics (WA) tried to find a way to restrict such athletes from taking part in women’s races in a bid to protect what they described as the “level playing field”, bringing about the Hyperandrogenism Regulations in 2011, which set a testosterone limit for women athletes.

Indian sprinter Dutee Chand challenged the rules at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in 2015, and CAS suspended them, asking WA to produce evidence that increased testosterone levels gave athletes an advantage.

In the meantime, with the rules lifted, Caster Semenya and others were able to return to the track, with three DSD athletes sweeping the 800m medals at the Rio Olympics.

WA returned with data, widely criticised by some in the scientific community, to show there was an advantage in events ranging from 400m to a mile. They believed there was an advantage in longer and shorter events, but could not back it up, and reserved the right to add further events once they had more evidence.

CAS accepted this and in 2018, a new version of the rules banned DSD athletes from competing in races within that range, unless they took testosterone-reducing medication for at least six months beforehand.

‘PARADOX IN ACTION’

South African Semenya had been at the forefront of the battle since she blazed onto the scene by winning the 800m at 2009 world championships as an 18-year-old, and was immediately consumed by the debate over her gender status.

After she was banned, she initially followed that medical route but saw a marked deterioration in her performances, and instead returned to fighting for the right to race in her natural state.

She lost that battle – all three 800m medallists from Rio are banned from Tokyo – despite widespread support from the South African government, who claimed the rules were discriminatory towards African athletes, and others who argued they were a violation of her human rights.

CAS agreed the DSD rules were discriminatory but crucially ruled that the discrimination was “necessary, reasonable and proportionate to protect the integrity of female athletics”.

WA had always said it was fundamentally impossible to find a solution that would satisfy both sides, and came down in support of the tens of thousands of female athletes around the world at the expense of the limited number of DSD athletes.

“It is a sensitive issue but there are some contexts, sport being one of them, where biology has to trump identity,” WA said.

The issue appeared to have gone quiet after Semenya lost her latest court battle in Switzerland, but it re-emerged in June when Masilingi and Mboma, who had been in sparkling form on the European circuit, were withdrawn from the Tokyo 400m events after tests revealed above-regulation levels of testosterone.

They entered the 200m instead and have twice posted personal best times – Mboma’s 21.97 seconds being an under-20 world record – to reach Tuesday’s final.

“The paradox in action … where we know that testosterone confers advantages in all events, but the policy implies it exists only in some,” wrote South African sports scientist Ross Tucker in his Science of Sport blog.

“Thus an athlete is legal one day, illegal the next, depending on the event,” added Tucker, who described WA’s original study as “poorly conceived … and very (very, very) weak on the evidence.”