Tag Archives: Sydney McLaughlin

Kenya fail to make to the finals in Women’s World Athlete of the Year

Kenya has failed to make it to the final list of the Women’s World Athlete of the Year Gala Award that will be held on December 5, 2022.

Double Olympic 1500m champion, Faith Kipyegon was the only female athlete nominated for the prestigious award but has failed to make it to the finals together with World shot put champion and world indoor shot put silver medallist Chase Ealey from the USA, World 200m champion Shericka Jackson from Jamaica, World indoor high jump champion and world high jump silver medallist, Yaroslava Mahuchikh from the Ukraine and World 400m champion, Shaunae Miller-Uibo from Bahamas.

Faith Kipyegon have been confirmed, as the countdown to the World Athletics Awards 2022 continues.

The five athletes, who represent five countries from three area associations, have achieved sensational performances across a range of athletics disciplines in 2022, at the World Athletics Championships Oregon22, World Athletics Indoor Championships Belgrade 22, one-day meeting circuits and other events around the world.

The finalists are (in alphabetical order):

Tobi Amusan, NGR
– World 100m hurdles champion
– Diamond League, Commonwealth and African 100m hurdles champion
– Set a world 100m hurdles record of 12.12

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, JAM
– World 100m champion, claiming a fifth gold medal in the event
– Diamond League 100m champion
– Ran a world-leading 10.62 among her record seven sub-10.70 100m races of the season

Kimberly Garcia, PER
– World 20km race walk champion, winning Peru’s first ever World Athletics Championships medal
– World 35km race walk champion in a South American record to complete a race walk double
– World Athletics Race Walking Team Championships 20km bronze medallist

Sydney McLaughlin, USA
– World 400m hurdles and 4x400m champion
– Broke the world 400m hurdles record with 51.41 at the US Championships
– Further improved the world record to 50.68 to win the world title

Yulimar Rojas, VEN
– World indoor and outdoor triple jump champion
– Diamond League triple jump champion
– Improved her world record to 15.74m in Belgrade

Voting procedure for 2022 World Athletes of the Year

A three-way voting process determined the finalists.

The World Athletics Council and the World Athletics Family cast their votes by email, while fans logged their decisions online via the World Athletics social media platforms where a record 1.3 million votes were registered.

The World Athletics Council’s vote counted for 50% of the result, while the World Athletics Family’s votes and the public votes each counted for 25% of the final result.

Voting closed on 31 October.

The World Athletes of the Year will be announced on World Athletics’ social media platforms in early December, as part of the World Athletics Awards 2022.

Athing Mu drops her coach

Tokyo Olympic 800m champion, Athing Mu has announced changes with her coaches as she gears up for the up coming track and field season.

The 20 year-old who became the first American woman to win the world 800m gold at the 2022 World Championships in Oregon, has dropped her coach Milton Mallard with track and field legend Bob Kersee.

Mu made her announcement through her social media handle twitter stating that, “I’m excited for this opportunity to train with the track legend Bob Kersee. Coach Kersee has the capability to further enhance my running skills and implement the tools needed to reach my greatest potential”

Millard is a legend in his own way as he took three athlete’s to the World Athletics Championships that included Mu who  on the USATF women’s 800m title, marking it the seventh time an athlete has earned gold under Mallard’s guidance as well as Brandon Miller who made his first career Team USA after placing third in the men’s 800m race, while Donavan Brazier earned an automatic spot after winning the title in 2019. Mu won the 800m World Athletics Championships in a time of 1:56.30, which made her to become the youngest woman in history to have won Olympic and world titles in an individual track and field event.

Coach Kersee was one time accused by Canadian record holder in the 100m, Angela Bailey in 1989, who stated that she did not want to train with him due to suspicions about performance-enhancing drugs.

Kersee has some reputable names under his stable that include the 2012 Olympic champion, Allyson Felix and the Tokyo 400m hurdles champion Sydney McLaughlin.

Faith Kipyegon nominated for World Female Athlete of the Year

Double Olympic 1500m champion, Faith Kipyegon has been nominated for the 2022 World Female Athlete of the Year Gala Award that will be held in December.

Kipyegon was named by the World Athletics as they released the 10 nominees for the 2022 World Female Athlete of the Year.

Kenya will be banking on the two times World 1500m champion, Kipyegon who has had an illustrious year.

The 27 year-old missed the 1500m world record by just three-tenths of a second and went ahead to claim the Diamond league title for the third time.

The nominations reflect some of the standout performances achieved at the World Athletics Championships Oregon22, World Athletics Indoor Championships Belgrade 22, one-day meeting circuits and other events around the world.

Below are the 2022 nominees for Women’s World Athlete of the Year (in alphabetical order):

Tobi Amusan, NGR
– World 100m hurdles champion
– Diamond League, Commonwealth and African 100m hurdles champion
– Set a world 100m hurdles record of 12.12

Chase Ealey, USA
– World shot put champion and world indoor shot put silver medallist
– Diamond League shot put champion
– Threw a world-leading 20.51m

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, JAM
– World 100m champion, claiming a fifth gold medal in the event
– Diamond League 100m champion
– Ran a world-leading 10.62 among her record seven sub-10.70 100m races of the season

Kimberly Garcia, PER
– World 20km race walk champion to win Peru’s first-ever World Athletics Championships medal
– World 35km race walk champion in a South American record to complete a race walk double
– World Athletics Race Walking Team Championships 20km bronze medallist

Shericka Jackson, JAM
– World 200m champion
– Diamond League 200m champion
– Ran a world-leading 21.45 to move to second on the world all-time list

Faith Kipyegon, KEN
– World 1500m champion
– Diamond League 1500m champion
– Ran a world-leading Kenyan record of 3:50.37, just three-tenths of a second off the world record

Yaroslava Mahuchikh, UKR
– World indoor high jump champion and world high jump silver medallist
– European high jump champion
– Jumped a world-leading 2.05m, equalling the outdoor national best

Sydney McLaughlin, USA
– World 400m hurdles and 4x400m champion
– Broke the world 400m hurdles record with 51.41 at the US Championships
– Further improved the world record to 50.68 to win the world title

Shaunae Miller-Uibo, BAH
– World 400m champion
– World indoor 400m champion
– NACAC 400m champion

Yulimar Rojas, VEN
– World indoor and outdoor triple jump champion
– Diamond League triple jump champion
– Improved her world record to 15.74m in Belgrade

A three-way voting process will determine the finalists.

The World Athletics Council and the World Athletics Family will cast their votes by email, while fans can vote online via the World Athletics social media platforms. Individual graphics for each nominee will be posted on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube this week; a ‘like’ on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube or a retweet on Twitter will count as one vote.

The World Athletics Council’s vote will count for 50% of the result, while the World Athletics Family’s votes and the public votes will each count for 25% of the final result.

Voting for the World Athletes of the Year closes at midnight on Monday 31 October. At the conclusion of the voting process, five women and five men finalists will be announced by World Athletics.

The winners will be revealed on World Athletics’ social media platforms in early December.

Further information about the World Athletics Awards 2022 will be announced in the coming weeks.

Tobi Amusan, Top Ranked African Athlete in New World Ranking

World 100m hurdles and the Commonwealth Games champion and record holder, Tobiloba Amusan is the top ranked African athlete according to the World Athletics Ranking that was released on Wednesday.

The 25-year-old who made history as the first Nigerian to win a world outdoor title and the first to set a world record following her 12.12 seconds run in Oregon in July is still ranked the fifth best in the overall women’s ranking.

The Nigerian scored 1489 points behind the Jamaican duo of Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce who has 1534 points and Shericka Jackson of 1526 points.  Venezuela’s triple jumper, Yulimar Rojas comes in third place with 1517 points while the American 400m champion, Sydney Mclaughlin taking the fourth place with 14.90 points.

Tobi as she is popularly known is however two places and 22 ranking scores above Ethiopia’s Gudaf Tsegay who won gold in the 5000m and a silver medal in the 1500m at the World Athletics Championships in Oregon.

The two-time World and Olympic 1500m champion, Faith Kipyegon from Kenya is placed third in Africa,

The Nigerian also retained her position as the top ranked high hurdler in the world ahead of reigning Olympic champion, Jasmine Camacho-Quinn from Puerto Rican and Jamaican, Britany Anderson.

 

 

Sydney McLaughlin smashes the 400m Hurdles World Record

Olympic 400m hurdles champion, Sydney McLaughlin smashed her own world record on day three of the USATF Outdoor Championships at Hayward Field in Oregon.

The 22 year-old has now set world records in three of her past four 400m hurdles finals. She set her first world record at this same venue last year’s during the US Olympic Trials where she clocked 51.90 seconds. McLaughlin went on to win the Olympic gold medal in Tokyo smashing her world record with 51.46.

Mclaughlin who had won her heat in a time of 54.11 on Thursday and the semifinal in 52.90 on Friday was it again on Sunday as she build a big lead in the back straight and entered the home straight with a lead of about 6m to cross the line in a new world record time of 51.41 seconds.

“I knew it was going to be fast. I looked at the time and I was really happy with it, being able to slowly progress towards lower and lower times. I think there are things I could work on. I think there is more in the tank there. At the World Championships I want to put on a show to the world,” said McLaughlin.

McLaughlin was followed by Britton Wilson, who came home in second with a new personal best of 53.08seconds with former world silver medallist Shamier Little closing the podium three finishes in 53.92.

Femke Bol confirms Munich 2022 European Athletics Championships ambitions

European 400m record holder Femke Bol outlined her plans for 2022 and confirmed that the Munich 2022 European Athletics Championships are part of her schedule for this coming summer.

Understandably, the World Athletics Championships in July are her main target, where she will hope to improve on her Olympic Games bronze medal last summer, where she reduced the continental standard to 52.03 in a thrilling final which saw a world record from the American winner Sydney McLaughlin.

“That is the most important tournament and I hope to be at my best there. At the European Athletics Championships, I hope to have held on to that peak and to put in another good performance,” comments the 21-year-old 2021 European Athletics Rising Star in an interview with the Dutch broadcaster NOS.

No Dutch woman has ever won a 400m hurdles medal at the European Athletics Championships so Bol has the additional motivation of trying to challenge the championship record of 52.92 set by Russia’s Natalya Antyukh in 2010. Bol beat that time on no less than four occasions during 2021.

And if Bol does triumph in Munich this summer, she will keep the title in her training group as the gold medal in Berlin 2018 went to the now-retired Lea Sprunger from Switzerland who also used to be coached by Laurent Meuwly.

She is hoping that improvements in her hurdling technique before the summer – and being able to sustain a 15-stride pattern between hurdles for longer – will lead to her going even faster with the 52-second barrier an additional target. “If you improve a hundredth (of a second) in your technique, that is already a tenth gained after ten hurdles; that would mean for me that I would run 51 seconds something,” she added, noting that she feels that her hurdling technique isn’t yet as polished as the two American hurdlers – McLaughlin and Dalilah Muhammad – who finished in front of her in Tokyo.

Bol also intends to run at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade in March, where she will contest the 400m without the barriers.

She won the European indoor title over two laps of the track in Torun, Poland last year, when she ran a European-leading indoor time and national record of 50.63, and would appear to have a very good chance to go for another gold in the Serbian capital.

Source: european-athletics.com

The 10 Most Thrilling, Mind-Blowing Races of 2021

From Athing Mu and Karsten Warholm on the track, to Peres Jepchirchir and Des Linden on the roads, these runs kept us on the edges of our seats.

After a year of race cancellations in 2020 because of COVID-19, in-person competition returned in a big way in 2021—and with it came a slew of historic performances.

The Tokyo Olympics this summer featured a number of world records and exciting podium finishes. Collegians broke through during their full season comeback to set records and mix it up with pros. And the World Marathon Majors returned with all six races scheduled within 42 days of each other, paving the way for some unprecedented accomplishments in the fall.

With a year’s worth of competition to reflect on, the Runner’s World editors picked 10 races that stood out from the rest. Here are the performances that put us on the edge of our seats in 2021.

Sydney McLaughlin of Team United States poses in front of the scoreboard after setting a new world record in the Women’s 400-m Hurdles Final on day 12 of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Olympic Stadium on August 04, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo : Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Sydney McLaughlin Breaks the World Record—Twice

This year, Sydney McLaughlin solidified herself as the greatest 400-meter hurdler of all time. The then-21-year-old kicked off the championship portion of her season by winning the final at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials in 51.90, shattering the world record set by fellow Team USA standout Dalilah Muhammad at the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Doha, Qatar.

In Tokyo, McLaughlin won Olympic gold in 51.46, improving on her world record.

Allyson Felix celebrates winning her 11th Olympic medal.

Allyson Felix celebrates winning her 11th Olympic medal.

Allyson Felix becomes the most decorated track star in U.S. history

In her fifth Olympic Games, Allyson Felix clocked two stunning performances. The first was in the women’s 400-meter final when the champion sprinter earned bronze in 49.46, her 10th Olympic medal. The podium finish made her the most decorated female Olympian in track and field, and she passed Merlene Ottey and tied Carl Lewis, who has 10, as the most decorated American athlete in track and field.

Days later, Felix passed Lewis in the record books when she contributed to Team USA’s gold medal in the 4×400-meter relay. With a 49.38-second second lap, Felix maintained the lead for the Americans, who ultimately won in 3:16.85—a time less than two seconds off the world record of 3:15.17.

Karsten Warholm smashes his own World Record

Karsten Warholm goes into Hulk mode after setting the world record

A few weeks after breaking the previous world record in the men’s 400-meter hurdles, Karsten Warholm shattered the time again by winning Olympic gold in 45.94. The Norwegian came out on top in an all-out sprint to the finish against Team USA’s Rai Benjamin to claim his first Olympic medal and improve on the previous record of 46.70 set in Oslo in July.

Warholm’s performance in Tokyo marked the first time in history that an athlete has run under the 46-second barrier in the 400-meter hurdles. His celebration was also a major highlight; after seeing his time, the 25-year-old was overcome with emotion and ripped apart his jersey.

Molly Seidel of the United States celebrates after winning bronze at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Molly Seidel takes bronze in the Olympic marathon

In her third 26.2 ever, Molly Seidel became the third American in history and the first since 2004 to earn a podium spot at the Olympic Games. During the marathon in Sapporo, the Notre Dame graduate put in a hard surge with 5K remaining to finish third in 2:27:46.

The breakthrough performance was the latest in a series of successes at the distance. Seidel made her marathon debut at the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials, where she finished second to make her first Olympic team. In October 2020, she lowered her personal best to 2:25:13 at the London Marathon.

Three months after Tokyo, Seidel improved still by finishing fourth at the New York City Marathon in 2:24:42, bettering the American course record set by Kara Goucher in 2008.

Teenager Athing Mu becomes first American since 1968 to win Olympic gold in the 800 meters. PHOTO: Getty Images

Teenager Athing Mu becomes first American since 1968 to win Olympic gold in the 800 meters

Capping off a season that rewrote the record books, Athing Mu led the women’s 800-meter final wire-to-wire to win Olympic gold. In the process of clocking 1:55.21 in Tokyo, the 19-year-old became the first American gold medalist in the event since Madeline Manning Mims in 1968. She also lowered her own American record.

As a freshman at Texas A&M, she set collegiate records in the 400 and 800 meters before winning two NCAA outdoor titles and later turning pro. The Tokyo Games was Mu’s first open international competition.

Eliud Kipchoge defended his Olympic medal, winning the men’s marathon held in Sapporo. Photo: Getty Images

Eliud Kipchoge repeats as Olympic champion with huge winning margin

After pulling away from the pack at mile 19, Eliud Kipchoge cruised to victory for the second time to repeat as champion in the men’s marathon at the Olympic Games. In Sapporo, the world record-holder from Kenya finished in 2:08:38, 1:20 ahead of silver medalist Abdi Nageeye of the Netherlands. His winning margin is the biggest since Frank Shorter won the 1972 Olympic marathon.

Kenya’s Peres Jepchirchir wins the women’s marathon final during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in Sapporo on August 7, 2021. (Photo by Giuseppe CACACE / AFP)

 Peres Jepchirchir wins back-to-back marathons

Just 13 weeks after winning the Olympic women’s marathon, Peres Jepchirchir won the New York City Marathon and became the first person since Shorter in 1972 to earn Olympic gold and then come to a major fall marathon and win again.

The Kenyan finished in 2:27:20 on a sweltering day in Sapporo on August 7, besting world record-holder and countrywoman Brigid Kosgei. On November 7, the two-time half marathon world champion fought off competitors Viola (Lagat) Cheptoo and Ababel Yeshaneh on the final stretch to secure another victory in Central Park. She covered the New York City course in 2:22:39.

Jacob Kiplimo breaks the half marathon world record

 Jacob Kiplimo breaks the half marathon world record

On November 21, Jacob Kiplimo lowered the world record by winning the Lisbon Half Marathon in 57:31, a 4:23/mile pace. The Olympic bronze medalist from Uganda improved on the previous world record of 57:32 set by Kibiwott Kandie at the Valencia Half Marathon in December 2020.

Kiplimo raced a mostly solo effort, breaking away from the competition just after 3K, and blazed through the 15K in 40:27—the fastest time ever recorded for the distance. He slowed down slightly in the later stages but held on just enough to dip under the record.

Des Linden sets the 50K record

Des Linden sets the 50K record

A little over a year after finishing an agonizing fourth place at the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials, Des Linden set her sights on a thrilling new challenge: The 50K world record.

On April 13, on a deserted bike path outside of Eugene, Oregon, the two-time Olympian covered 50K (31.06 miles) in 2:59:54, more than seven minutes faster than the previous record of 3:07:20, set by British ultrarunner Aly Dixon in 2019. Linden averaged 5:47/mile pace to set the new record.

Cole Hocker (center) and Yared Nuguse (left) both qualified for the U.S. Olympic team as college athletes. Photo: CORTNEY WHITE

Two collegians make the Olympic team in the men’s 1500 meters

 The men’s 1500-meter final at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials was a nail-biter, with plenty of exciting buildup to set the stage for an upset and a rivalry.

During the NCAA regular season, then-Oregon runners Cooper Teare and Cole Hocker broke the NCAA indoor mile record by running 3:50.39 and 3:50.55, respectively, on February 12 in Arkansas. In May, Notre Dame runner Yared Nuguse broke the collegiate record in the 1500 meters by clocking a solo 3:34.68 in the first round of the ACC Outdoor Track and Field Championships. In June, Nuguse and Hocker faced off at the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships, where Hocker out-kicked Nuguse. The middle-distance stars met again two weeks later as only two collegians in the 1500-meter final at the Trials in Eugene, Oregon.

With an all-out sprint down the homestretch, Hocker won the national title in 3:35:28, beating 2016 Olympic champion Matthew Centrowitz, who finished second. Nuguse secured his place on the Olympic team by placing third, but he withdrew from the Games with a quad strain.

Source: runnersworld.com

Seeing’s not believing as shoe tech rips up the record books

When World Athletics chief Sebastian Coe began his review of the year by highlighting “some jaw-dropping performances” he perfectly encapsulated the sport’s current paradox – people are stunned by what they are seeing, but not necessarily impressed.

For decades, huge world records were often greeted with a weary assumption of doping but many of today’s even bigger leaps are the result of “performance-enhancing technology”.

The dropping of the jaw is all-too often accompanied by the shaking of the head as a succession of astounding performances on track and road have left fans utterly discombobulated.

Illustrating the issue perfectly was the men’s Olympic 400 metre hurdles final in Tokyo this year, widely acclaimed as one of the greatest races in history.

American Kevin Young’s world record of 46.78 seconds had stood for 29 years before Norway’s Karsten Warholm finally nibbled eight hundredths off it in Oslo in July.

In Tokyo, Warholm scorched an incredible 45.94 seconds, while American Rai Benjamin and Brazilian Alison do Santos were also inside Youngs’ mark that had been untouchable for almost three decades.

As sceptics reacted not with adulation but with questions about the seemingly obvious impact of the new carbon-plated, thick-soled spikes and the “energy-returning” Tokyo track, Benjamin hit back by saying he could have done it in any shoes.

“No one will do what we just did,” he said. “Kevin Young, Edwin Moses (who broke the world record four times and won two Olympic golds in a 10 year run of 122 consecutive race wins), respect to those guys, but they cannot run what we just ran.”

SIMILAR STORY

It was a similar story, albeit with smaller margins, in the women’s event where Sydney McLaughlin and Dalilah Muhammad ran inside McLaughlin’s pre-Games world record and almost a second faster than the mark set by Russian Yuliya Pechonkina in 2003 that stood for 16 years.

Of course, times have always got faster and technical innovations have helped, but the leaps being seen now are, in the words of Warholm himself, “taking credibility away from our sport” as he bizarrely criticised Benjamin’s carbon shoes for having thicker soles than his own.

One of the other highlights of the Tokyo Olympic programme was Jamaican Elaine Thompson-Herah’s unprecedented retention of both 100m and 200m titles as, also aided by carbon spikes, she edged within touching distance of the extraordinary and hugely dubious times set by the late Florence Griffith Joyner in 1988.

It is a similar story on the roads, where World Athletics’ 2020 shoe design rules must be one of the greatest examples of closing the stable door after the horse has not only bolted but disappeared over the hills.

Records continue to tumble at all levels and this year has seen almost two minutes wiped off the women’s half-marathon world record, in three massive bites.

Coe says it is pointless now trying to place these seemingly stupendous performances in historical context and, in the case of the two 400m hurdles races, for example, he is surely right that fans should sit back and just appreciate the stunning head-to-head showdowns on the biggest stage of all.

However, perhaps the most uplifting event of the athletics year did not feature a record, or an outright winner, as Mutaz Essa Barshim of Qatar and Italian Gianmarco Tamberi found themselves locked together after three fails at 2.39 metres in the Olympic high jump final.

Barshim asked an official: “Can we have two golds?” and when he said “yes”, and both men erupted in joy, it was truly one of the great Olympic moments.

Karsten Warholm and Elaine Thompson named World Athletics Athletes of the Year

Norwegian Karsten Warholm and Jamaican Elaine Thompson-Herah were named World Athletics Athletes of the Year on Wednesday 1 December in Monaco, France.

Warholm won the men’s award beating a strong field that included fellow Olympic gold medalists Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya, Joshua Cheptegei from Uganda, Ryan Crouser from USA and Mondo Duplantis from Sweden.

Warholm broke twice what was the longest-standing world record among men’s track races set by American Kevin Young, who went 46.78 in the 1992 Olympic final. Warholm lowered it to 46.70 on July 1, then to 45.94 in the Tokyo Olympic final.

In the Olympic run alone, Warholm took 1.6 percent off the world record, just shy of Michael Johnson‘s 1.7 percent drop in the 1996 Olympic 200m final.

Warholm is the first Norwegian man to take this award.

Thompson-Herah also thrashed a strong field that included Sifan Hassan from Netherlands, Faith Kipyegon from Kenya, Sydney McLaughlin from USA and Yulimar Rojas from Venezuela.

She became the first woman to win 100m, 200m and 4x100m golds at one Olympics since Florence Griffith Joyner in 1988.

Thompson-Herah also clocked the second-fastest 100m and 200m times in history (10.54, 21.53), trailing only Griffith Joyner’s world records.

Athing Mu dominates the Athlete of the Year Awards

Tokyo Olympic Games 800m champion, Athing Mu has dominated the 2021 Wing Awards and Athlete of the Year Awards that will be held at the 2021 Night of Legends on Saturday, December 4 in Orlando, Florida.

The voting has now been opened for fans to choose their favorite athlete of the year and the best performer with the Jesse Owens, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, and Wing Awards.

USATF will present all awards as part of the Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida The event will also include the USATF National Track and Field Hall of Fame class of 2021 induction ceremony.

The awards have been presented annually since 1981; the Jesse Owens Award and Jackie Joyner-Kersee Award are USA Track & Field highest accolades.  This is United States highest award for the sport, it bears Jesse Owens’s name in recognition of his significant career, which included four gold medals at the 1936 Olympic Games.

The winners will be selected by the fans and media by voting to choose their most outstanding male and female athletes, winners are selected by a combination of fan and media votes.

The Wing Awards honor a variety of top performances, including Best Olympics Performance for Track as well as Field, and Breakout Performer.

Nominees are:

Female Athlete of the Year:

  1. Valarie Allman
  2. Allyson Fellix
  3. Sydney McLaughlin
  4. Athing Mu
  5. Katie Nageotte

Male Athlete of the Year:

  1. Kenny Bednarek
  2. Rai Benjamin
  3. Ryan Crouser
  4. Fred Kerley

Best Olympic Track Performance:

  1. Rai Benjamin
  2. Allyson Felix
  3. Sydney McLaughlin
  4. Athing Mu

Best Olympic Field Performance:

  1. Valarie Allman
  2. Ryan Crouser
  3. Katie Nageotte

Breakthrough Athlete of the Year:

  1. Courtney Freirichs
  2. JuVaughn Harrison
  3. Cole Hocker
  4. Fred Kerley
  5. Athing Mu
  6. Molly Seidel