Tag Archives: Sisay Lemma

2022 Boston Marathon is the deepest field in history

This Boston Marathon may not have legends Eliud Kipchoge or Kenenisa Bekele, but it does have most of the other stars of recent years. It is arguably the deepest Boston men’s field in the race’s 126-year history.

Like with the women’s race, Boston got a boost with a return to its Patriots’ Day date for the first time since 2019. The world’s other jewel spring marathon, London, which usually has the best roster of the spring, is once again being held in the fall this year due to the pandemic.

So this field includes every man who won Boston, London and New York City in 2019 and 2021 (save Kipchoge), the last two world champions, plus recent winners of Chicago and Tokyo.

Picking a favorite is difficult, but the entries can be separated between recent breakthroughs and veteran champions.

Three men in the field earned their first major marathon victories last fall: Kenyans Benson Kipruto (Boston) and Albert Korir (New York City) and Ethiopian Sisay Lemma (London).

The names with more pizzazz: Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor, a longtime training partner of Kipchoge, won New York City in 2017 and 2019, plus three world half marathon titles. But he was fourth in his lone marathon since the start of the pandemic, missing time after fracturing a tibia when hit by a motorcycle while training in June 2020.

Kenyan Lawrence Cherono is the only man other than Kipchoge to win two annual major marathons in one year since the start of 2015. He claimed Boston and Chicago in 2019 and hasn’t had a bad marathon in four years.

Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa is still just 32 years old, which is remarkable given his resume: Boston champion in 2013 and 2015, New York City champion in 2018 and world champion in 2019. He has a DNF and a 35th in two marathons over the last two and a half years, though.

Another Ethiopian, Birhanu Legese, is the third-fastest man in history and thus the fastest man in this field with a personal best of 2:02:48 from 2019. He won Tokyo in 2019 and 2020 and hasn’t finished worse than fifth in a marathon in the last three and a half years.

Ethiopians Lemi Berhanu (won Boston in 2016, second in 2021) and Evans Chebet (seventh-fastest man in history at 2:03:00) also deserves mention.

The fastest Americans in the field are Scott Fauble (2:09:09) and Colin Bennie (2:09:38), plus Olympians Jake Riley and Jared Ward.

Source:  olympics.nbcsports.com

Kenenisa Bekele targets the World record at Berlin-Marathon

World record holder in both the 5000m and 10000m, Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia will be targeting to lower the marathon world record at the 48th edition of the BMW Berlin-Marathon that will be held on 26th September in Berlin, Germany.

Bekele will target to lower his time as he clearly demonstrated it when he took the top honors at the 2019 Berlin marathon when he crossed the line with the second fastest time of 2:01.41.

This is underlined not only by his victories at the Berlin-Marathon in 2016 and 2019, but also by his captivating performances at the 2009 World Athletics Championships in the capital city on the Spree River. At the races in the Olympic Stadium, Bekele won World Championship gold in the 10,000 m for the fourth time in a row and took the World Championship title in the 5,000 m a week later.

“I will come back with good energy and motivation to Berlin-Marathon. The last race in Berlin motivated me a lot, so I hope I will fulfil my plan this year.” So, in many ways, the Berlin-Marathon 2021 will be an event with historic sporting significance,” Bekele said.

The 39-year-old will try to match or lower the time of his only rival the greatest athlete of all time Eliud Kipchoge, who ran 2:01.39 in 2018 and ranks above him in the world all-time list. Bekele knows all too well what it is like to miss the world record by a narrow margin.

In 2016, he won in 2:03.03 which was just six seconds outside the then world record. There are also historical precedents for such narrow misses in marathon history: in 1985 the Welshman Steve Jones ran within one second of the world record in Chicago.

The 2019 podium clean swept by Ethiopians as Birhanu Legese, crossed the line in second in 2:02.48 to become the third fastest marathoner in history. Third place went to Sisay Lemma, running a personal best of 2:03.36.

Shura Kitata faces a tough battle as he defends his London Marathon title

Ethiopia’s Shura Kitata will be the star to watch at the 41st edition of the London Marathon that will be held on 3rd October in London.

Kitata who pulled out of the Olympic Games marathon last weekend after suffering in the hot and humid conditions in Sapporo – will line up with the other men who joined by Vincent Kipchumba from Kenya and Sisay Lemma from Ethiopia, who also struggled in the heat of the Olympic Games marathon.

Shura beat Eliud Kipchoge in the 2020 London Marathon to secure his first London Marathon title, just a second ahead of Vincent Kipchumba.

The two will be joined by the 2020 Valencia Marathon champion, Evans Chebet who was the fastest man in the world last year with his personal best of 2:03.00.Another title contender is the two-time Tokyo Marathon champion Birhanu Legese from Ethiopia, who is the third-fastest marathoner of all time with a time of 2:02.48 that he got at the 2019 Berlin Marathon.

Kitata will also face-off with Mosinet Geremew and  Mule Wasihun both coming to the race with a personal best of 2:02.55 and 2:03.16) respectively. This two also finished on the podium at the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon, also return.

Kitata was quoted by race organisers saying,“I was disappointed to have to pull out of the Olympic Games marathon but I just did not adapt to the weather well. It was very cold in Ethiopia prior to leaving for Tokyo and when we got there the weather took its toll on my body and made my breathing very hard. But I’m healthy and looking forward to racing in the Virgin Money London Marathon again. I am preparing very well and my coach has me very ready to defend my title in London.

 “Winning last year was an unforgettable memory and it gave me huge excitement to bring back such a big victory to my country and to make my family and coaches proud. I have set my mind on how I can run fast and better than last year and I’m looking forward to seeing if I can repeat the victory and make history in the race.”

Virgin Money London Narathon event director, Hugh Brasher, said: “We are delighted to welcome our reigning champions back to defend their titles at the 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon and, as always, they will be challenged by a stellar field of the world’s best marathon runners. Sunday 3 October is set to be an extraordinary day in our history as these great athletes lead the way as tens of thousands of mass runners take on their 26.2 mile challenge from Greenwich to Westminster and around the world in the virtual event.”

The organisers have allowed a limit of up to 50,000 runners in the mass race and up to 50,000 around the world to take on the virtual event, completing the 26.2 miles on the route of their choice any time between 00:00 and 23:59:59 BST.

LEADING RESULTS

ELITE MEN

Name Country PB
Birhanu LEGESE ETH 2:02:48
Mosinet GEREMEW ETH 2:02:55
Titus EKIRU KEN 2:02.57
Evans CHEBET KEN 2:03.00
Mule WASIHUN ETH 2:03.16
Sisay LEMMA ETH 2:03.36
Kinde ATANAW ETH 2:03.51
Shura KITATA ETH 2:04.49
Vincent KIPCHUMBA KEN 2:05.09
Tristan WOODFINE CAN 2:10.51

Chemlany leads elite runners to compete in Prague Marathon

Former Macao Marathon champion Stephen Kwelio Chemlany is leading a slew of Kenyan stars at this year’s Prague Marathon on May 6.

Chemlany has had a good performance in Asia, winning in China and South Korea at the Seoul Marathon.

However, he seeks to dominate a new fortress as he heads to Europe, eyeing the Prague title against a top international lineup, which includes Chicago Marathon champion Galen Rupp.

“It will have top names because the course there is good. But it is down to what you do in your preparations and then wait to see how the opponents perform against your running. I have no worries of injuries and am focused on doing the job right in Prague,” Chemlany said on Wednesday from Eldoret, Kenya.

Chemlany, who has been training in the USA, was runner-up at the 2011 Berlin Marathon and came fourth at the 2013 Berlin Marathon.

He leads five Kenyan runners including Japhet Kosgei (2:08:88), Barselius Kipyego, who clocked 2:13:06 last year in Ljubljana, Duncan Maiyo and Felix Kibitok, who is making his debut in the marathon.

America’s Rupp, who dropped out of the Boston Marathon two weeks ago, is hopeful to be back to fitness just 20 days after his failed attempt in his home country.

Rupp dropped out of Boston Marathon, which was held under cold and windy conditions, because of breathing and hypothermia problems.

The course record in Prague is held by Kenya’s Eliud Kiptanui at 2:05:39 and has stood the test of time since 2010. In each of the last nine editions of Prague Marathon, the winning time has been under two hours and nine minutes.

Rupp’s personal best is 2:09:20, which he ran to win last year’s Chicago Marathon in October.

Other athletes expected to race in Prague include Sisay Lemma of Ethiopia (2:04:08), Bazu Worku (2:05:25), Mekuant Ayenew (2:09:00) and Japan’s Suehiro Ishikawa (2:09:10).

source: xinhuanet.com