Tag Archives: Sifan Hassan

Every World Record in the Wanda Diamond League

When Karsten Warholm clocked 46.70 at his home meet in Oslo last July, it was the end of his long quest to break an almost three-decades old world record and cement his status as the fastest 400m hurdler in athletics history.

The astonishing performance also made him the seventh athlete ever to break a world record in a major discipline on the Wanda Diamond League circuit. As we look forward to another season of world-class performances in 2022, here’s a look back at every single Wanda Diamond League world record to date.

Watch all the world records on the Wanda Diamond League YouTube page.

 Aries Merritt – Brussels 2012

US hurdler Aries Merritt became the first world-record breaker in the Diamond League when he stormed to a historic 12.80 in the men’s 110m hurdles in Brussels. The performance also secured him his first and only Diamond Trophy.

 Genzebe Dibaba – Monaco 2015

Genzebe Dibaba was crowned 1500m world champion in Beijing in 2015, but she had already made it to the top of the world a few weeks earlier with a breathtaking 3:50.07 at the Stade Louis II. The dominant victory made her the series’ second world-record breaker, and the first of many at the Monaco Diamond League.

 Kendra Harrison – London 2016

Having suffered heartbreak at the US Olympic trials earlier that year, Kendra Harrison was a woman on a mission in the 2016 Diamond League as she stormed to victory after victory in the 100m hurdles. She crowned an impressive, title-winning season with a world record of 12.20 in London, a performance which left even her gaping in disbelief at the clock.

 Beatrice Chepkoech – Monaco 2018

Kenyan long-distance specialist Beatrice Chepkoech was in brilliant form in 2018, and she made it count in Monaco, clocking a 3000m steeplechase world record of 8:44.32, becoming the fifth athlete to break a world record at Herculis and the second after Dibaba to do so in the Diamond League era.

 Sifan Hassan – Monaco 2019

Dutch star Sifan Hassan had a twinkle in her eye when she was asked about a potential world record ahead of the Monaco Diamond League in 2019, and that proved a prelude to her glittering performance on the track. Her 4:12.33 made her the fastest female miler in history, and gave her another boost on her way to a Diamond League double in that season.

 Joshua Cheptegei – Monaco 2020

In a season truncated by the coronavirus pandemic, there was the only men’s 5000m race in 2020, but what a race it was. Monaco completed a hat-trick of world-record breaking years, as Ugandan long-distance star Joshua Cheptegei clocked to 12:35.36 to break the 5000m best for the first time since 2004.

 Karsten Warholm – Oslo 2021

Warholm had been closing in on the 400m hurdles world record for several seasons when he finally broke it with 46.70 on his home track in Oslo last summer. He went one better at the Olympic final in Tokyo a few weeks later, becoming the first hurdler ever to break the 46-second barrier.

Note: Three world records were also broken in non-Diamond League disciplines at the Wanda Diamond League exhibition event in Brussels in September 2020: Bashir Abdi in the 20,000m, and Mo Farah and Sifan Hassan in the One Hour.

Source: diamondleague.com

‘I was just so happy to survive’ – Sifan Hassan reflects on epic Olympic treble bid

As Sifan Hassan flopped to the Tokyo track, it was difficult to guess her emotions. Joy at becoming only the second woman to complete an Olympic distance double?

Regret that the 1500m title that would have made it an unprecedented treble had slipped away the previous evening?

Relief that a campaign that covered more than 15 miles in eight days was finally over?

A mix of all three?

In fact it was none of them but rather something more primal.

“Honestly, at that moment, I was just so happy to survive,” she tells Sport Today on BBC World Service.

“I was really in pain, I was suffering so much, I was sweating very, very, very hard, all my face was burning, my hand was burning, all my body was burning. I felt I had no water inside me.

“I thought I was going to pass out. In that moment I didn’t mind about gold, I just wanted to be alive and healthy.”

The Dutchwoman’s Olympic ambitions had taken her to the very edge of her endurance.

Not since the days of sepia news reels had an athlete taken on such a monster schedule, competing in the 1500m, 5,000m and 10,000m, with the longest distance coming last on a suffocatingly humid night in the Japanese capital.

Hassan flat out, framed by worried medical staff, clutching ice to her grimacing face was the final scene.

But the 29-year-old’s epic assault on the Olympics had already featured the see-sawing emotional swings of a summer blockbuster.

On the morning of 2 August, she tripped at the start of the final lap of her 1500m heat. Her rivals cantered on as she scrabbled on the floor. For an instant it seemed her bid for three golds was over before it had really begun.

Hassan sprung to her feet, hared after the pack, made up 25 metres on them, and came through to win.

That evening, she returned to the Olympic Stadium and motored away from world champion Hellen Obiri to clinch 5,000m gold.

Despair to delight. But her second and final gold, that draining 10,000m triumph, was fuelled by anger.

Hassan had been unable to stick with the pace in the previous night’s 1500m final. Britain’s Laura Muir and Kenyan winner Faith Kipyegon turned up the heat to leave Hassan third.

On the bottom step of the podium, she stewed.

“When I lost, at the time, I was so mad,” she says.

“At the medal ceremony, when I went back to my room I knew there was something inside me.

“That was when I decided: I will die tomorrow, I will go to the end.”

Hassan’s third-place finish in the 1500m final behind Kenya’s Faith Kipyegon (centre) and Great Britain’s
Laura Muir (left) fueled her win in the next day’s 10,000m final

The frustration and disappointment came out with everything else as she emptied the tanks in her final Tokyo race.

While Hassan’s rivals picked and chose their events, zeroing in to maximise their chances of gold, she says curiosity was behind her decision to go for a full house of distance events.

Was it possible, she asked herself? Logistically, athletically, mentally, could she contend across three events at the highest level in a painfully short span of time?

She could. And now she, and others, might do it again.

“God willing,” she says, when asked about the prospect of fighting on three fronts at another major championship.

“But I don’t think it will be as hard as in Tokyo, because I have done it.

“Even if another athlete had done it, it is going to be much easier because we know it is possible.

“Something is always more difficult when we don’t know before.”

Her curiosity has been piqued by something else, though.

Hassan has plans to combine road and track, banking that her extraordinary talent can bridge the divide between the two.

She hopes to step up to marathons, while still taking on the best in stadiums. It’s another huge challenge.

Britain’s Mo Farah, himself an Olympic double distance champion, can attest to how confidence forged on the track can crumble on the tarmac, even when focusing solely on the marathon.

Hassan, though, has already shown in Tokyo that she’ll go to the brink to chase history and pursue greatness.

Laura Muir: I’ve got a few years left in these legs – Olympic silver was not the end

Laura Muir knows she may never better the Olympic silver medal that gave Britain a night to remember in Tokyo.

But as the New Year dawns she insists her first taste of global success has only made her more hungry.

Until now Muir awoke from every Hogmanay resolving to shed her ‘nearly’ tag. Not today, not after that 1,500 metres performance.

It remains to be seen whether she will ever top beating Sifan Hassan to second place behind Faith Kipyegon in a British record time.

But the 28-year-old Scot has made clear she will not fail for the want of trying.

“The fire inside me is, if anything, burning even more fiercely now,” she said. “Tokyo gave me a taste of what it’s like to be on a global podium.

“I want more of that; I want to add more medals. It’s going to be incredibly tough. This is probably the most competitive time there’s been in my event. But I’m very excited to be a part of that.”

Rather than rest on her laurels, Muir has targeted all three championships this summer: Worlds, Commonwealths and Europeans.

She has already returned to racing, winning the Scottish Short Course Cross-Country Championships.

It was small beer compared to the Olympics but it sent a message that she is back up and running, business as usual.

“I think I’ve got a few years left in these legs,” she smiled. “I’ll keep on running competitively for as long as my body holds up.

“To have finally put a performance out there that shows the calibre of athlete I am is huge for me. I always knew I could do it, but going to Tokyo and delivering has given me huge belief.

“I will now go into championships more relaxed, with the confidence that I’ve been and done it already. That’s a huge hurdle. Now I’m over it, things should be a bit smoother in that sense.

“It’s going to be hard, of course it is. But I’m incorporating more strength and conditioning work to make me stronger.

“It’s a matter of being consistent and staying injury free. If I work as hard as I can hopefully it will get me closer and closer to that golden position.”

Alberto Salazar’s lifetime ban upheld

Former American track coach Alberto Salazar’s lifetime ban appeal for sexual misconduct has been rejected by the US Center for SafeSport.

The 63-year-old was handed the lifetime ban following allegations he had emotionally and physically abused a number of athletes during his time as part of the Nike Oregon Project.

In January 2020, SafeSport temporarily banned Salazar with the decision subsequently made permanent in July 2021.

Salazar ran the Nike Oregon Project , based in Beaverton, Oregon.

It was established in 2001 and was the home of British four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah.

Farah has not been accused of doping, and left the Oregon Project in 2017.

A BBC Panorama film revealed last year that Farah was questioned about his relationship with Salazar by US investigators in 2015, but he has never failed a doping test, nor been accused of doping. Salazar also coached Dutch runner Sifan Hassan, who took triple medals at the just concluded Tokyo 2020 in the 1500m, 5000m and 10,000m. It eventually resulted in bans for both Salazar and Nike endocrinologist Dr Geoffrey Brown, announced in October 2019.

Before he became a coach, Salazar was one of the most talented distance runners of his generation, winning the New York City marathon in 1980, 1981 and 1982. He is also famous for the ‘Duel in the Sun’ at the Boston Marathon in 1982.

Karsten Warholm and Elaine Thompson named World Athletics Athletes of the Year

Norwegian Karsten Warholm and Jamaican Elaine Thompson-Herah were named World Athletics Athletes of the Year on Wednesday 1 December in Monaco, France.

Warholm won the men’s award beating a strong field that included fellow Olympic gold medalists Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya, Joshua Cheptegei from Uganda, Ryan Crouser from USA and Mondo Duplantis from Sweden.

Warholm broke twice what was the longest-standing world record among men’s track races set by American Kevin Young, who went 46.78 in the 1992 Olympic final. Warholm lowered it to 46.70 on July 1, then to 45.94 in the Tokyo Olympic final.

In the Olympic run alone, Warholm took 1.6 percent off the world record, just shy of Michael Johnson‘s 1.7 percent drop in the 1996 Olympic 200m final.

Warholm is the first Norwegian man to take this award.

Thompson-Herah also thrashed a strong field that included Sifan Hassan from Netherlands, Faith Kipyegon from Kenya, Sydney McLaughlin from USA and Yulimar Rojas from Venezuela.

She became the first woman to win 100m, 200m and 4x100m golds at one Olympics since Florence Griffith Joyner in 1988.

Thompson-Herah also clocked the second-fastest 100m and 200m times in history (10.54, 21.53), trailing only Griffith Joyner’s world records.

Letesenbet Gidey: First and Only woman to hold 4 World Records simultaneously

She remains a unique women athlete on the globe, breaking all records before her as she holds four world records under her medal cabinet.

Ethiopian Letesenbet Gidey remains a woman of all firsts after shooting into the limelight in 2015 when she won the World Cross Country Junior Championships in Guiyang, China.

Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia Wins the World Cross Country junior title in 2015. PHOTO: Getty Images

Born and raised in the troubled Endameskel, aged 17 years, she made her name known across the globe when she won the world cross country junior title for her nation.

She went ahead to win bronze at the 2019 World Cross Country Championships behind the champion Hellen Obiri and her country mate Dera Dida.

At 21, she won silver in 10,000m at the 2019 event with her personal best of 30:21.23 in a race that was won by Sifan Hassan from the Netherlands who also ran a world lead with the late Agnes Jebet Tirop winning bronze.

In the same year Gidey went on produced again one of her fastest time ever in the Outdoor 3000m race that was held in Palo Alto, California where she set a National Record of 8:20.27.

Letesenbet Gidey destroyed women’s 15km World record at the annual Zevenheuvelenloop in Nijmegen, Netherlands. PHOTO: NN Running Team

The Ethiopian went on rampage in November 2019 setting a new world record of 44:20 in the 15K run at the Zevenheuvelenloop road race in Nijmegen, Netherlands, breaking the previous world record held by Joyciline Jepkosgei that she had set in 2017 by more than a minute, and becoming the first woman to run 15K under 45 minutes.

Having four titles as a junior, she went to 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games with a mission to be on the podium and she did with a bronze in the 10,000m behind Sifan Hassan with Bahrain’s Kalkidan Gezahegne (the current 10Km world record holder though not ratified) taking the silver.

Letesenbet Gidey Shatters 5000 World Record Valencia. PHOTO NN RUNNING TEAM

With just six years since 2015, Gidey has written her name in four world record events she smashed her first world 5,000m record during the 2020 in 14:06.62 and this summer she went ahead and shattered the world record in the 10,000 meters in Hengelo, Netherlands. She is the first woman since Ingrid Kristiansen from 1986-1993 to hold them both simultaneously.

Letesenbet Gidey poses for after breaking the world record in women’s 10,000m. PHOTO: COURTESY

Gidey obliterated the women’s half marathon world record in her debut at the distance, winning the Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso in 1:02.52. The Ethiopian’s performance improved on the previous world record of 1:04.02 that had been set by Ruth Chepngetich in Istanbul in April—by 70 seconds. This was the third world record the 23-year-old has broken in the last year.

Gidey’s winning time of 1:02.52 marks the first time a woman has ever run faster than the 64 and 63-minute barrier for the half marathon distance.

To put Gidey’s time into perspective, according to World Athletics scoring tables, 62:02 equates to approximately a 13:50 5K, 29-minute 10K and a 2:11 marathon.

Her performance in the half-marathon surpassed both of her previous records. It also indicates that if she moves up to the marathon, she’ll be a strong contender to take down that record as well, which is currently held by Brigid Kosgei at 2:14:04.

This time shows the projections of what someone could run at different distances based on that performance. Her actual splits on that day were no less impressive, however, and she went through 5K in 15:00, sped up over the next 5K to split 29:45 for 10K and went through 15K in 44:29. This 15K time is remarkable, considering it is only nine seconds slower than her own 15K world record.

Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey smashes the World Half Marathon record at the Valencia Half Marathon. PHOTO: Getty Images

Faith Kipyegon to battle Sifan Hassan at the 2021 Female athlete of the Year

Two times Olympic 1500m champion Faith Kipyegon will battle with the double Olympic champion in 5000m and 10000m Sifan Hassan at the 2021 World Athletes Female of the Year.

Kipyegon is among the 10 nominees for the female Athlete of the Year, Female World Athlete of the Year who were selected by an international panel of athletics experts, comprising representatives from all six continental areas of World Athletics.

The nominees for 2021 Female World Athlete of the Year are:

Valarie Allman, USA
– Olympic discus champion
– Diamond League discus champion
– North American discus record

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, PUR
– Olympic 100m hurdles champion
– Broke the Olympic 100m hurdles record
– National record 12.26 moved to equal fourth on the world all-time list

Sifan Hassan, NED
– Olympic 5000m and 10,000m champion
– Olympic 1500m bronze medallist
– Broke the world 10,000m record

Faith Kipyegon, KEN
– Olympic 1500m champion
– Diamond League 1500m champion
– Kenyan 1500m record

Mariya Lasitskene, ANA
– Olympic high jump champion
– Diamond League high jump champion
– Jumped world-leading 2.05m

Sydney McLaughlin, USA
– Olympic 400m hurdles champion
– Olympic 4x400m champion
– Set two world 400m hurdles records

Shaunae Miller-Uibo, BAH
– Olympic 400m champion
– North American 400m record
– North American indoor 400m record

Athing Mu, USA
– Olympic 800m and 4x400m champion
– World U20 indoor 800m record
– North American U20 records at 400m and 800m

Yulimar Rojas, VEN
– Olympic triple jump champion
– Diamond League triple jump champion
– World triple jump record

Elaine Thompson-Herah, JAM
– Olympic 100m, 200m and 4x100m champion
– Diamond League 100m champion
– National 100m and 200m records, second fastest of all time.

The voting process officially began on Thursday, with the World Athletics Council and the World Athletics Family set to cast their votes by email.

For fans, they will be able to vote via the World Athletics social media platforms either by ‘liking’ a graphic of their favourite athlete or via a retweet on twitter.

Sifan Hassan crowned the 2021 European Athlete of the Year

Double Tokyo Olympics Games champion Sifan Hassan from the Netherlands has been crowned the 2021  European Woman Athlete of the Year at the Golden Tracks award ceremony that was held on Saturday (16) evening in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Hassan has been an outstanding performer this summer having won three medals that included the 5000m, 10,000m and 1500m bronze titles.

Hassan was crowned women’s European Athlete of the Year for the first time and she becomes just the second Dutch athlete to win this accolade after Dafne Schippers in 2014 and 2015.

Hassan – who was unfortunately not able to be present at the awards ceremony and Dutch federation President Eric van der Burg received her trophy on her behalf from European Athletics Vice President Cherry Alexander – won ahead of fellow Olympic champions Anita Wlodarczyk from Poland and Mariya Lasitskene, the latter being the 2019 European Athlete of the Year.

Hassan has also been in record-breaking form this season. She decimated Almaz Ayana’s world 10,000m record of 29:17.45 on home soil at the FBK Games in Hengelo in June with 29:06.82.

That mark was subsequently broken two days later on the same track by Letesenbet Gidey but Hassan outsprinted the Ethiopian for the Olympic 10,000m title, her sixth race in the Japanese capital after winning gold in the 5000m and then bronze in the 1500m.

It was a successful evening for Dutch athletics as European 400m hurdles record-holder Femke Bol was crowned women’s Rising Star.

Summary of Golden Tracks award winners 

  • Women’s European Athlete of the Year – Sifan Hassan (NED)
  • Men’s European Athlete of the Year – Karsten Warholm (NOR)
  • Women’s Rising Star – Femke Bol (NED)
  • Men’s Rising Star – Sasha Zhoya (FRA)
  • European Athletics Community Award – Maria Andrejczyk (POL)
  • European Athletics Women’s Leadership Award – Ana Krstevska (MKD)
  • Member Federation Award – Georgina Drumm (IRL)
  • European Athletics Coaching Award – Hansruedi Kunz (SUI)

 

President Uhuru Kenyatta: Track down the person responsible for Agnes Tirop’s Death

President Uhuru Kenyatta has led Kenyans in mourning the sudden death of former world cross country champion Agnes Tirop.

The world 10km record holder was found dead in her house at the free-area in Iten, Egeyo Marakwet County on Wednesday morning. The athlete, who has dominated both track and road running was part of team kenya at the Olympic Games and finished 4th in the 5,000m in a race won by Netherland Sifan Hassan.

The president’s message of condolence and comfort to the family, friends, relatives, and the athletics fraternity, the President mourned Agnes as a Kenyan hero and champion whose death is a big blow to the country’s sporting ambitions and profile.

“It is unsettling, utterly unfortunate and very sad that we’ve lost a young and promising athlete who, at a young age of 25 years, she had brought our country so much glory through her exploits on the global athletics stage including in this year’s 2020 Tokyo Olympics where she was part of the Kenyan team in Japan,” the President eulogized.

“It is even more painful that Agnes, a Kenyan hero by all measures, painfully lost her young life through a criminal act perpetuated by selfish and cowardly people,” the President said, and directed the police to hasten the search and apprehension of the athlete’s killers.

“I urge our law enforcement agencies led by the National Police Service to track down and apprehend the criminals responsible for the killing of Agnes so that they can face the full force of the law,” the Head of State directed.

The Head of State, who is out of the country on an official visit of the US, prayed for God’s grace and calm for the family, friends, relatives and supporters of Agnes Tirop as they come to terms with the athlete’s shocking death.

Men’s and women’s European Athlete of the Year finalists announced

With 10 days until the Golden Tracks award ceremony takes place in Lausanne, Switzerland on 16 October, we can announce the three finalists for the men’s and women’s European Athlete of the Year.

The shortlist includes both the 2019 European Athletes of the Year Mariya Lasitskene and Karsten Warholm, both of whom won gold medals at the Tokyo Olympic Games and trophies in the Diamond League final in Zurich.

The shortlist was determined by a four-part voting process which incorporates votes from fans across social media, Member Federations, media and an expert European Athletics panel. Each section constituted 25 percent of the vote.

Sifan Hassan (The Netherlands)

Sifan Hassan almost pulled off the unthinkable feat of winning three individual gold medals at the same Olympics. Hassan won the 5000m and 10,000m titles but the Dutchwoman came up narrowly short in the 1500m, settling for bronze behind Faith Kipyegon and Laura Muir.

Hassan’s pre-Olympic campaign was highlighted by a world 10,000m record of 29:06.82 in Hengelo – a mark which was beaten on the same track only two days later by Letesenbet Gidey – and while her exploits in Tokyo had understandably caught up her, the seemingly indefitagle Hassan still finished her season with a flourish.

After winning over 5000m in Eugene, Hassan ran one of the fastest mile times in history in Brussels with 4:14.74 before finishing a close second to Kipyegon over 1500m in the Diamond League final in Zurich.

Mariya Lasitskene (Authorised Neutral Athlete / Russia)

Mariya Lasitskene has won multiple world and European titles both indoors and outdoors but an Olympic medal was conspicuously absent from her collection.

Still a junior at the time of the 2012 Olympics, Lasitskene missed out on selection for London and the blanket ban on Russian athletes meant Lasitskene was absent from the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

Troubled by a knee injury all season, Lasitskene only qualified for the final by virtue of a third-time clearance at 1.95m but the Russian showed her immense competitive mettle by clearing season’s best of 2.02m and then 2.04m to seal the title.

Lasitskene, who was the 2019 European Athlete of the Year, then went on to clear 2.05m in the Diamond League final in Zurich. Will she become just the second athlete after Dafne Schippers (2014-15) to win the award in back-to-back editions?

Anita Wlodarczyk (Poland)

Like Lasitskene, Anita Wlodarczyk was on the comeback trail from injury but the seasoned campaigner had timed her peak to perfection.

The world record-holder created history at the Olympic Games in Tokyo by becoming the first female athlete to win three successive gold medals in the same event, clinching a third gold medal in the hammer with a winning mark of 78.48m – her best mark in three years.

Armand Duplantis (Sweden)

His world record of 6.18m remains just beyond his reach for now but Armand Duplantis achieved a record for consistency at the highest level, clearing six metres or higher in no fewer than 12 competitions indoors and outdoors.

His indoor season was highlighted by a 6.10m clearance in Belgrade, a precursor to another title at the European Indoor Championships in Torun where he cleared 6.05m to take ownership of the championship record in the arena in which he broke the world record for the first time in 2020.

Duplantis suffered two unexpected losses outdoors but the American-based Swede won every significant competition including gold at the Olympic Games with 6.02m and the Diamond League final in Zurich with 6.06m.

Duplantis has previously been a winner at the Golden Tracks. He was named joint men’s Rising Star in 2018 alongside Norway’s Jakob Ingebrigtsen following their incredible exploits at the European Athletics Championships in Berlin.

Lamont Marcell Jacobs (Italy)

The men’s sprinting scene was thrust wide open this season and the vastly improving Lamont Marcell Jacobs duly filled this void with two scintillating performances in the 100m at the Tokyo Olympics.

Having broken the 10 second-barrier ahead of Tokyo, Jacobs eclipsed the European record with a 9.83 clocking in the semifinal before storming to gold in the final in 9.80. Further success came at the end of the championships as Jacobs ran the second leg of Italy’s gold medal-winning team in the 4x100m.

Jacobs gave notice of what was to come this summer by dominating the 60m at the European Athletics Indoor Championships in Torun where he won gold in a world lead of 6.47. He also caught the attention of eagle-eyed track fans with a scintillating 8.91 split at the World Relays in Silesia.

Karsten Warholm (Norway)

Karsten Warholm raced lightly in 2021 but his performances were of a stratospheric standard.

Warholm clinched the world record from Kevin Young, appropriately on home soil at the Bislett Games in Oslo with 46.70 but the Norwegian tore his record asunder at the Olympic Games in Tokyo where he broke through the 46 second-barrier with 45.94 – a respectable time even for the 400m flat!

For the third successive season, Warholm enjoyed an unbeaten campaign in the 400m hurdles. He also took notable wins in Monaco and Berlin as well as in Zurich at the Diamond League final.

At 25, Warholm is one of the few athletes to have won both the Rising Star award and the men’s European Athlete of the Year award. Will he win again in Lausanne?

Source: european-athletics.com