Tag Archives: Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

Where to watch the World Athletics Continental Tour

The 2021 World Athletics Continental Tour Gold series continues on Sunday (5) with the Kamila Skolimowska Memorial in Silesia, Poland.

Sprint stars Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Andre De Grasse will headline the event, while there will also be a wealth of champions in action in the field events, including a fond farewell to a legend of Polish athletics in Piotr Malachowski.

Here’s how you can follow the action in Silesia.

Follow and watch

Schedule | Entry lists and results

A two-hour live stream of the meeting will be available in a number of territories via the World Athletics YouTube channel, beginning at 17:00 local time, CEST.

The YouTube stream will be geoblocked in the following territories:
Albania, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Botswana, British Virgin Islands, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Caribbean Netherlands, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo – Brazzaville, Congo – Kinshasa, Croatia, Cuba, Curaçao, Czechia, Côte d’Ivoire, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Finland, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Martinique, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Montenegro, Montserrat, Mozambique, Namibia, New Caledonia, Niger, Nigeria, North Macedonia, Norway, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Rwanda, Réunion, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, St. Barthélemy, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Martin, St. Pierre & Miquelon, St. Vincent & Grenadines, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, São Tomé & Príncipe, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos Islands, Uganda, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Wallis & Futuna, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Coverage of the meeting will be available in the territories listed below. Be sure to check local listings – some broadcasts may be live while others will consist of highlights.

FloTrack Australia, USA
OverSport Albania, Kosovo
ArenaSport (AS6 in Bosnia Herzegovina, North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Kosovo, AS1 in Slovenia, AS3 in Croatia) Bosnia Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Serbia, Slovania
Flow Sports
Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Bonaire, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Curacao, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadaloupe, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Saint Barthelemy, St. Kittis and Nevis, St. Lucia, Saint Martin, St. Vicent and the Grenadies, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobado, Turks and Caicos
Czech TV (Live on ceskatelevize.cz/sport and delayed as of 18:10 local time on Czech TV) Czech Republic
 NENT (Sweden: V Sport 1 and Viaplay, Norway: V Sport 1 and Viaplay, Iceland and Denmark: Viaplay) Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden
CCMore Sport 1 Finland
L’Equipe France, French Polynesia, Guadaloupe, Martinique, Mayotte, New Caledonia, Reunion, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Martin, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Wallis and Futuna, French Guyana
sportdeutschland.tv Germany
Sport2 (delayed, 5 September 22:45-00:45 CEST) Hungary
COSMOTE Sport 6HD Greece
Sky Sport Arena Italy
TVP Poland
huste.joj.sk Slovakia
DirecTV Sports Channel Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Venezuela, Uruguay
TG4 (highlight delay, no geoblocking) Ireland
SuperSport (GSL1 / SSME / VR3 / VR3A) Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Congo DR, Ivory Coast, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madgascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Tago, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe
ESPN3 (no geoblocking) Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama
SPORTV2 (delayed, 6 September 18:00 GMT, no geoblocking Brazil
Swiss Sport TV Switzerland
CBC Canada

 

Social media

– World Athletics: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram
– Continental Tour Gold: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram
– Kamila Skolimowska Memorial: website | Twitter | Facebook

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce pulls out of Paris Diamond meeting

Sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has pulled out of the Wanda Diamond League meet set for Paris, France on Saturday.

She has cited fatigue. Fraser-Pryce ran a personal best of 10.60 seconds at the Lausanne leg of the Diamond League on Thursday, five days after previously competing at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Oregon.

She was also in action at the Tokyo Olympic Games from July 29 to August 7.

The 29-year-old had run the second-fastest 100m of all-time last Saturday in blistering 10.54 seconds to win at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene as she beat the Olympic sprint queen Elaine Thompson-Herah in the women’s 100 metres at the Athletissima.

Timothy Cheruiyot and Faith Kipyegon are the top ranked Africans in the latest world rankings

World Athletics devised a new global ranking system where athletes score points on a combination of result and place depending on the level of the competition in which the result is achieved. The ranking is based on an average score over a number of competitions over a period of time.

The African continent has managed to get two athletes who have been included in the overall ranking with two times Olympics gold medallist Faith Kipyegon ranked number four in women overall with

Timothy Cheruiyot who is the Olympic silver medallist ranked number nine.

Norways Karsten Warholm and Sifan Hassan from the Netherlands have been ranked as the top athletes in the world.

The rankings pre-Olympics actually help determined what athletes made up the final spots in Japan and were no doubt a reason why the qualifying standards were harder than normal to put a greater importance on the rankings system.

World Athletics has now updated the rankings taking into account the Olympic results on the rankings published on August 18 and then again a few days after the Eugene meeting a week later and they make interesting reading but to some still need a tinkering with.

Ironically the rankings are a better reflection of athletes abilities after Oregon than they were after the Olympics which suggests the organisation hasn’t quite got their priorities right.

When athletes win Olympic golds in the fastest time of the year such as Elaine Thompson-Herah at 100m, Athing Mu at 800m and Sydney McLaughlin and 400m hurdles they should be the world no.1 rather than a very consistent athlete with a better set of marks?

Overall men
while most attention has been on the ranking in individual events, there is an overall ranking and it’s no surprise that Karsten Warholm is now regarded as the top overall athlete from fellow Scandinavian Armand Duplantis. World shot record-breaker Ryan Crouser moved from fifth to third after Eugene moving ahead of Canadians Damian Warner and Andre de Grasse.

1 Karsten Warholm (NOR) 1539
2 Armand Duplantis (SWE) 1535
3 Ryan Crouser (USA) 1500
4 Andre de Grasse (CAN) 1491
5 Damian Warner (CAN) 1473
6 Alison Dos Santos (BRA) 1466
7 Jakob Ingebrigtsen (NOR) 1465
8 Rai Benjamin (USA) 1463
9 Timothy Cheruiyot (KEN) 1444
10 Kenny Bednarek (USA) 1443

 Overall women
Thanks to her versatility from 1500m to 10,000m, Sifan Hassan is comfortably top woman from fellow double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah who has closed the gap significantly after her Eugene run. A recent world record-breaker Yulimar Rojas is not surprisingly third but it does not quite seem right and Femke Bol was fourth overall after the Olympics even though she was clearly only third best at her best event but she lost two places to Faith Kipyegon and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce after their Eugene efforts with the Jamaican likely to move up further after her Lausanne win in next week’s rankings.

1 Sifan Hassan (NED) 1534
2 Elaine Thompson-Herah (JAM) 1515
3 Yulimar Rojas (VEN) 1475
4 Faith Kipyegon (KEN) 1474
5 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) 1458
6 Femke Bol (NED) 1455
7 Katie Nageotte (USA) 1444
8 Jasmine Camacho-Quinn (PUR) 1433
9 Peres Jepchirchir (KEN) 1430
10 Hyvin Kiyeng (KEN) 1429

 

Fraser-Pryce beats Olympic champion Thompson-Herah at Athletissima

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce produced one of the astonishing kick as she beat the Olympic sprint queen Elaine Thompson-Herah in the women’s 100 metres on Thursday at the Athletissima Wanda Diamond League meeting in the Stade Olympique de la Pontaise, Switzerland.

The 29-year-old had run the second-fastest 100m of all-time last Saturday in blistering 10.54 seconds to win at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, but found herself beaten by her 34-year-old fellow Jamaican in one of the night’s many surprises.

Happily, the wind gauge was within the legal limit, allowing Fraser-Pryce to improve her lifetime best she set on home ground in Kingston in June by 0.03 and add some gloss to the third spot she holds on the world all-time list – behind the 10.49 Florence Griffith-Joyner recorded at the 1988 US Olympic trials in Indianapolis.

Having finished a distant second in both races, Fraser-Pryce – the four-time world and two-time Olympic 100m champion – now finds herself firmly in the frame as the Jamaican rivals look to update the record books.

“Believe it or not, I still have not run my best race,” the veteran sprint queen maintained afterwards. “I know there is more to give because I still need to work further on improving my technique.

“There will be more from me this season, and certainly my goal is to break into the 10.5 range.”

It was Fraser-Pryce’s 21st sub-10.8 clocking and her first win against her Jamaican teammate since the Jamaican Olympic trials in late June, when she emerged victorious from both the 100m and 200m.

The two are due to continue their rivalry, plus their bid to break Florence Griffith Joyner’s 33-year-old world record of 10.49, at the next Diamond League meeting in Paris on Saturday.

Are super shoes distorting history?

Athletics chiefs are under pressure to outlaw controversial ‘super-shoes’ after the sport’s top scientist admitted the rules governing them need to be revamped.

Olympic records are expected to tumble at Tokyo 2020, with competitors using hi-tech footwear that has led to record books being rewritten at an astonishing rate.

Usain Bolt last week joined the outcry against the governing body for permitting the shoe technology, with the sprint legend describing the situation as ‘laughable’.

Bermon suggested that the current regulations, which simply limit the depth of the sole and the number of hi-tech stiff ‘plates’ within it, are not sophisticated enough.

Figures within World Athletics have previously avoided giving any indication as to whether the rules will need to be changed once a moratorium on doing so ends after the Games. ‘After the moratorium we will very likely have new rules governing these shoes,’ said Bermon. ‘In the longer term, we will probably have new rules based on different characteristics other than a simple measurement.

‘It seems what is mediating the highest performance-enhancing effect is likely the stiff plate. Regulating this would mean — and this is something we are likely going to move — just regulating on measuring the shoes and the number of plates is not enough. We should move to a system that is based on energy return.’

Elite road running has been transformed since Nike released its VaporFly shoe four years ago, with athletes producing a slew of remarkable performances.

They included the Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge breaking the fabled two-hour marathon barrier wearing a pair, while his compatriot Brigid Kosgei beat Paula Radcliffe’s 16-year-old marathon world record by 81 seconds a day later.

The introduction of track spikes using similar technology has had a similarly transformative effect and will be widely used in Tokyo. Uganda’s Joshua Cheptegei set world records over 5,000m and 10,000m wearing a pair, while in June Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce clocked 10.63 seconds in the 100m, second only to Florence Griffith-Joyner.

Fraser-Pryce last week argued that too much signifance has been assigned to the shoe, saying: ‘You can give the spike to everyone in the world and it doesn’t mean they will run the same time as you or even better. It requires work.’

But Bolt believes they are unfairly enhancing performance, saying: ‘It’s weird and unfair for a lot of athletes because I know that in the past shoe companies actually tried and the governing body said ‘No, you can’t change the spikes’, so to know that now they are actually doing it, it’s laughable.’

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce argued that too much significance has been assigned to the shoe

Scientists are uncertain why the shoes bestow such enormous benefits but it is understood the key technology is the stiff plate, often made of carbon, and the ultra-light, springy foam.

Along with an upper in the road shoe that is more curved than previous designs, it is felt that these qualities significantly reduce the amount of energy the runner expends.

World Athletics has capped the depth of the sole at 40mm to limit the effect of the foam and insisted on a maximum of one plate per shoe. Critics have said those rules do not go far enough. Especially when some athletes find much less benefit from the shoes compared to others and some enjoy no improvement at all. The reasons for that phenomenon has also so far baffled the scientists.

‘The same shoe gives you a massive variability among different athletes — even greater than 10 per cent [improvement in performance] in some cases,’ says Professor Yannis Pitsiladis, who sits on the science and medical commission of the International Olympic Committee.

‘How you respond to the shoe can determine if you’re going to be an Olympian or watch it on TV. You know who is going to win and who can qualify [for the Games]. Athletes have qualified because they had access to a super shoe. And many who were not running in these shoes didn’t qualify.’

Pitsiladis compares the shoes to a form of ‘technological doping’ and wants the regulations to be changed so that the shoes cannot determine the outcome of a race.

‘One solution is to minimise the stack [sole] height, while allowing the shoe companies to innovate in a smaller area, minimising the impact of any performance-enhancing mechanisms such as the carbon-fibre plate,’ he says.

‘Let the best companies come up with half a per cent [improvement in performance], say, or one per cent. But not a situation where you have improvements in running economy of even greater than seven per cent.’

Experts fear that the working group World Athletics has put together to advise the ruling body on the regulations post-Tokyo will not go far enough, especially when representatives of six sports brands are sitting on it.

‘The moratorium was also because we had to discuss with the manufacturers,’ said Bermon. ‘It’s very important that you respect the manufacturers. They have spent a lot of time and money designing these shoes. We have to take decisions that do not put them into difficult economic circumstances.’

The working group also includes representatives from the governing body itself, its athletes commission, the ‘sporting goods industry’ and a scientist. World Athletics said: ‘The group is examining the research around shoe technology in order to set parameters, with the aim of achieving the right balance between innovation, competitive advantage, universality and availability.’

Thomas Baines – National 800m runner – I tried the shoes for size, and flew!

I raced in the Nike Air Zoom Victory spikes for the first time on Saturday and broke my 800metres personal best by more than a second.

I reached 600m and thought ‘Wow, I have a lot left in the tank’. I felt like I saved more energy with each contact with the ground.

They are so springy. I put my foot down and felt a burst of energy, a lovely bounce, when I came up. They really work with you, you get a spring up and it is a lot more efficient, as it absorbs the energy when you go down and pushes you back up, so you fatigue less.

National 800 metre runner Thomas Baines raced in the Nike Air Zoom Victory spikes

You just don’t have to work as hard so it is helping with the basic biomechanics of running. It allows you to get a longer stride without putting any extra effort in. It is not that the spikes make you run quicker, just that you have so much more left at the end. That’s the key.

I finished in 1min 49.6sec at the Loughborough Grand Prix, which is 1.1sec off my previous best. I was second behind a 1500m European junior champion also wearing the spikes.

My aim now is to get to GB under-23 level, to compete at the European Championships. If I can keep improving the spikes will definitely help too. I trained in the Vaporfly trainers on a 10km run last week.

Running at an easy pace I would normally be clocking 4min 40sec pace per kilometre. Putting in the same amount of effort, I got a few kilometres in, glanced at my watch and was ‘Oh my God!’ I’m running 4.20 per kilometre. It felt very easy. The same route took two minutes quicker in the end.

You can see why the professionals are using them. You can see the difference they make in the times. In 2019 there were two runners who ran under 1min 45sec. This season already there are six, with Elliot Giles now No4 on the UK all-time list behind Seb Coe, Steve Cram and Peter Elliott, with Oliver Dustin No6.

We haven’t had these sort of times run before from so many in the same season. It is making a big difference but at the Olympics all the elite athletes will be wearing spikes that use this technology, so it is a fair test.