Tag Archives: Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

Kenya fail to make to the finals in Women’s World Athlete of the Year

Kenya has failed to make it to the final list of the Women’s World Athlete of the Year Gala Award that will be held on December 5, 2022.

Double Olympic 1500m champion, Faith Kipyegon was the only female athlete nominated for the prestigious award but has failed to make it to the finals together with World shot put champion and world indoor shot put silver medallist Chase Ealey from the USA, World 200m champion Shericka Jackson from Jamaica, World indoor high jump champion and world high jump silver medallist, Yaroslava Mahuchikh from the Ukraine and World 400m champion, Shaunae Miller-Uibo from Bahamas.

Faith Kipyegon have been confirmed, as the countdown to the World Athletics Awards 2022 continues.

The five athletes, who represent five countries from three area associations, have achieved sensational performances across a range of athletics disciplines in 2022, at the World Athletics Championships Oregon22, World Athletics Indoor Championships Belgrade 22, one-day meeting circuits and other events around the world.

The finalists are (in alphabetical order):

Tobi Amusan, NGR
– World 100m hurdles champion
– Diamond League, Commonwealth and African 100m hurdles champion
– Set a world 100m hurdles record of 12.12

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, JAM
– World 100m champion, claiming a fifth gold medal in the event
– Diamond League 100m champion
– Ran a world-leading 10.62 among her record seven sub-10.70 100m races of the season

Kimberly Garcia, PER
– World 20km race walk champion, winning Peru’s first ever World Athletics Championships medal
– World 35km race walk champion in a South American record to complete a race walk double
– World Athletics Race Walking Team Championships 20km bronze medallist

Sydney McLaughlin, USA
– World 400m hurdles and 4x400m champion
– Broke the world 400m hurdles record with 51.41 at the US Championships
– Further improved the world record to 50.68 to win the world title

Yulimar Rojas, VEN
– World indoor and outdoor triple jump champion
– Diamond League triple jump champion
– Improved her world record to 15.74m in Belgrade

Voting procedure for 2022 World Athletes of the Year

A three-way voting process determined the finalists.

The World Athletics Council and the World Athletics Family cast their votes by email, while fans logged their decisions online via the World Athletics social media platforms where a record 1.3 million votes were registered.

The World Athletics Council’s vote counted for 50% of the result, while the World Athletics Family’s votes and the public votes each counted for 25% of the final result.

Voting closed on 31 October.

The World Athletes of the Year will be announced on World Athletics’ social media platforms in early December, as part of the World Athletics Awards 2022.

Faith Kipyegon nominated for World Female Athlete of the Year

Double Olympic 1500m champion, Faith Kipyegon has been nominated for the 2022 World Female Athlete of the Year Gala Award that will be held in December.

Kipyegon was named by the World Athletics as they released the 10 nominees for the 2022 World Female Athlete of the Year.

Kenya will be banking on the two times World 1500m champion, Kipyegon who has had an illustrious year.

The 27 year-old missed the 1500m world record by just three-tenths of a second and went ahead to claim the Diamond league title for the third time.

The nominations reflect some of the standout performances achieved at the World Athletics Championships Oregon22, World Athletics Indoor Championships Belgrade 22, one-day meeting circuits and other events around the world.

Below are the 2022 nominees for Women’s World Athlete of the Year (in alphabetical order):

Tobi Amusan, NGR
– World 100m hurdles champion
– Diamond League, Commonwealth and African 100m hurdles champion
– Set a world 100m hurdles record of 12.12

Chase Ealey, USA
– World shot put champion and world indoor shot put silver medallist
– Diamond League shot put champion
– Threw a world-leading 20.51m

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, JAM
– World 100m champion, claiming a fifth gold medal in the event
– Diamond League 100m champion
– Ran a world-leading 10.62 among her record seven sub-10.70 100m races of the season

Kimberly Garcia, PER
– World 20km race walk champion to win Peru’s first-ever World Athletics Championships medal
– World 35km race walk champion in a South American record to complete a race walk double
– World Athletics Race Walking Team Championships 20km bronze medallist

Shericka Jackson, JAM
– World 200m champion
– Diamond League 200m champion
– Ran a world-leading 21.45 to move to second on the world all-time list

Faith Kipyegon, KEN
– World 1500m champion
– Diamond League 1500m champion
– Ran a world-leading Kenyan record of 3:50.37, just three-tenths of a second off the world record

Yaroslava Mahuchikh, UKR
– World indoor high jump champion and world high jump silver medallist
– European high jump champion
– Jumped a world-leading 2.05m, equalling the outdoor national best

Sydney McLaughlin, USA
– World 400m hurdles and 4x400m champion
– Broke the world 400m hurdles record with 51.41 at the US Championships
– Further improved the world record to 50.68 to win the world title

Shaunae Miller-Uibo, BAH
– World 400m champion
– World indoor 400m champion
– NACAC 400m champion

Yulimar Rojas, VEN
– World indoor and outdoor triple jump champion
– Diamond League triple jump champion
– Improved her world record to 15.74m in Belgrade

A three-way voting process will determine the finalists.

The World Athletics Council and the World Athletics Family will cast their votes by email, while fans can vote online via the World Athletics social media platforms. Individual graphics for each nominee will be posted on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube this week; a ‘like’ on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube or a retweet on Twitter will count as one vote.

The World Athletics Council’s vote will count for 50% of the result, while the World Athletics Family’s votes and the public votes will each count for 25% of the final result.

Voting for the World Athletes of the Year closes at midnight on Monday 31 October. At the conclusion of the voting process, five women and five men finalists will be announced by World Athletics.

The winners will be revealed on World Athletics’ social media platforms in early December.

Further information about the World Athletics Awards 2022 will be announced in the coming weeks.

A world record is possible next season, says Fraser-Pryce

It may not have happened in 2022 but five-time World 100 metres champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce says that she is still aiming to get to her goal of a sub-10.6-second clocking after a season in which she has registered multiple sub-10.7 times.

Fraser-Pryce completed her campaign by capturing her fifth Diamond League 100m title at the Diamond League final in Zürich, clocking 10.65 for victory ahead of World 200m champion and 200m Diamond League winner Shericka Jackson who posted 10.81 and Marie-Josee Ta Lou who was third in 10.91.

In a season where all her times have been sub-11 seconds, Fraser-Pryce has clocked seven sub-10.7 times starting from the 10.67 clocking in her first 100m race of the season in May. The level of consistency this year has pleased her but she says it has also fuelled her desire to break another barrier, going sub 10.6 which she is targeting for next year.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (centre) of Jamaica crosses the finish line to win the women’s 100 metres at the Diamond League finals in Zürich, Switzerland, September 8. Fraser-Pryce won in 10.65 seconds.Photo: PA

“I’ve always believed that I can run 10.6 and I’ve always believed that I can run 10.5. And as long as I have that self-belief, as long as I continue to work and trust that it’s out there and there is something special that is coming, then I am going to continue working towards it until the wheels fall off,” Fraser-Pryce said after her 100m race. “To be able to end the season with a 10.6 is really special. I didn’t get the 10.5 but next year is another year.”

SUCCESSFUL END

While it was a successful end to her season, she acknowledged that the result could have been much different.

Fraser-Pryce pulled out of the much-anticipated clash between herself, Jackson and double sprint Olympic champion Elaine Thompson Herah at the Diamond League meet in Lausanne three weeks ago citing discomfort in her hamstring. The problem resulted in her contemplating ending her season after but she proceeded to compete in Brussels last week, the penultimate meet of the Diamond League campaign.

Fraser-Pryce said that she was grateful to be able to make a strong return after the withdrawal and finished the season the way she wanted to despite the adversity.

“I have to give God thanks. Because in Lausanne, I really had a scare and it was kind of hard mentally to really work back from that and to get back into that groove. But I am glad that was able to come back to do it and finish strong,” Fraser-Pryce said. “Because sometimes it’s easy to run away. It’s easy to fold your tail and go away when things are not working the way you wanted them to. But I am glad that I was able to stick this out.”

In addition to targeting a 10.5 clocking, Fraser-Pryce will have an opportunity to win three straight World 100m titles at the 2023 World Championships in Budapest, having earned a wild card for the championships as the defending champion.

 

Source: jamaica-gleaner.com

Lausanne Diamond League schedule, times and how to watch on TV and online

The 2022 Diamond League season continues with another star-studded meet in Lausanne, Switzerland tonight.

It’s been a hectic few weeks of athletics action for the British stars, with the World Championships in Eugene being followed by the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham and then the European Championships in Munich.

But the big international names are ready to go again, with Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson-Herah set to go head-to-head again in the 100m final.

Elsewhere, the Athletissima meet features a packed schedule with Noah Lyles and Yulimar Rojas also in action as the season begins to wind down ahead of meetings in Brussels and Zurich.

Here’s everything you need to know including the full Lausanne schedule and how to watch on TV.

When is the Lausanne Diamond League meet?

It takes place on Friday 26 August, with the action getting underway from just after 5pm BST.

How can I watch it?

It will be shown live in the UK on BBC Three, with coverage starting from 7pm. It will also be shown live on the BBC Sport website and BBC iPlayer.

What is the full Lausanne schedule?

All times BST

17:10 – 800m Men

17:20 – Triple Jump Men

17:20 – 100m B Women Heat III

17:25 – 100m B Women Heat II

17:30 – 100m B Women Heat I

17:40 – 1500m U18/U20 Men

17:50 – 1500m U18/U20 Women

18:00 – 200m Women

18:10 – 400m B Women

18:10 – Pole Vault Women

18:25 – 5x80m Relay Youth Mixed

18:30 – Javelin Throw Men

18:36 – 400m Hurdles Men

18:48 – 1500m Wheelchair Men

19:04 – 400m Hurdles Women

19:10 – High Jump Men

19:12 – 800m Women

19:22 – 110m Hurdles Men

19:33 – 1500m Men

19:40 – Triple Jump Women

19:43 – 3000 women Women

19:59 – 100m Women

20:00 – Shot Put Men

20:06 – 3000m Steeplechase Men

20:23 – 100 Hurdles Women

20:31 – 400m Women

Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce runs world leading time in Silesia

Five times World 100m Champion, Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce ran a world leading time in a non-Diamond League 100m race at the Memorial Kamila Skolimowska held at Silesian Stadium in Chorzow, Poland.

Fraser Pryce who won the 100m world gold medal in 10.67 and two silver medals in the 200m in 21.82 and in the 4×100 in 41.18, held the previous record of this event of 10.81 but she managed to lower it down today with a blistering world leading time of 10.66.

Commonwealth Games chief hits out at absent stars and insists they “will regret”

Birmingham 2022 chief has hit out at stars who opted to skip the Commonwealth Games and insisted they will regret failing to compete at the event.

Several leading names opted to miss the Games, including sprint world champions Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Shericka Jackson. Many stars cited the fact that the event in Birmingham was held so close to the World Athletics Championships in Eugene, Oregon as the reason they skipped, with Fraser-Pryce actually in attendance.

Other world champions from the recent meeting in the United States that have elected to be absent from the Commonwealth Games include women’s 400m winner Shanae Miller-Uibo and Faith Kipyegon. The Kenyan edged out Brit Laura Muir – who is competing for Scotland – to win 1500m gold.

Regardless, Birmingham 2022 CEO Ian Reid remained defiant in the face of absent stars and declared they will regret their choice. He said: “We can’t make people come here but, if Shelly-Ann was here earlier and saw the atmosphere and the full stadium, she probably regrets it.

“To have 30,000 people in Alexander Stadium for every session of athletics, the atmosphere it’s created, I can’t think of anywhere better for these athletes to be. There are some others who aren’t here but my personal opinion is they will probably regret it.”

Reid’s sentiment was shared by three-time Commonwealth Games champion Daley Thompson. The Englishman won decathlon gold at the Olympics in 1980 and 1984, but won his Commonwealth titles between 1978 and 1986.

“If there are people that want to earn a living and go and race in Zurich or wherever that might be that’s fair enough,” Thompson said. “But from my point of view it was only ever about winning championships and being the best.

“I think the people who go for the money are missing out because it’s a brilliant place to be. Elaine Herah-Thompson was running today, she’s here. If it’s good enough for her, it’s good enough for most people.”

These comments come after English swimming star Adam Peaty criticised the event, suggesting he was ‘not that bothered’ about the Commonwealth Games as he looked ahead to his 100m breaststroke final on Tuesday night. Peaty backtracked on his comments insisting the emotion had got to the two-time Olympic champion in the moment.

Christine Mboma a doubt for African Championships

Namibian sprinter Christine Mboma is a doubt for the African Athletics Championships next month after suffering a thigh injury.

The 18-year-old was injured during the 100m at the Kip Keino Classic continental tour meeting in Kenya on Saturday, pulling up and failing to finish the race, which was won by Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce.

Mboma’s coach Henk Botha told BBC Sport Africa the Olympic 200m silver medallist will be out for at least three weeks after receiving the results of an MRI scan in South Africa this week.

The African Championships begin on 8 June in Mauritius.

“She has a tear in her upper thigh muscle,” Botha added.

“Currently we are not sure about the African Championships but we will only know [if she will compete] in her 10-day assessment. She will definitely be ready for World Championships and the Commonwealth Games.”

Mboma, who is the reigning BBC African Sport Personality of the Year, is currently Africa’s highest-rated sprinter after an impressive 2021 season which saw her claim the Diamond League trophy and the junior World title over 200m in addition to silver at the Tokyo Olympics.

She will not feature in Friday’s Diamond League season opener in Doha, having been expected to race in a field which also includes USA’s Olympic bronze medallist Gabrielle Thomas and Great Britain’s world champion Dina Asher Smith.

The World Athletics Championships begin on 15 July in Oregon, United States, with the Commonwealth Games starting on 28 July in Birmingham, England.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce ready for the showdown in Nairobi

Three time Olympic 100m champion, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce “Pocket Rocket” of Jamaica landed in Kenya last night with hopes of having a memorable run as she starts her season at the 3rd edition of the Absa Kip Keino Classic Continental Tour that will be held on Saturday (7) at the Moi International Sports Centre Kasarani, in Nairobi.

The 35 year-old landed in Kenya on Wednesday evening promising a good performance against Kenyans where she intends to start her 100m season ahead of Diamond Leagues as well as the World Championships and Commonwealth Games.

“Why not come to Kenya. Kenya is regarded as the home of athletics and I definitely wanted to come here and open my season in 100m and hopefully I will be able to have a fantastic race,” she Fraser-Pryce.

The 2014 World Indoor Champion has seven medals from the Olympics and 12 from the World Athletics Championships, will battle for honors with Kenya National champion Millicent Ndoro among others.

She won the 100m Olympic titles starting from 2008 in Beijing, 2012 in London, 200m title in Tokyo Olympics winning silver.

Sha’Carri Richardson to battle Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce at Kipkeino Classic

Three-time Olympic and nine-time world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is the latest high profile athlete confirmed at the 3rd edition of the Absa Kip Keino Classic Continental Tour that will be held on May 7, at the Moi International Sports Centre Kasarani, Nairobi.

The Jamaica will face the fast rising American sprinter Richardson during the one day event.

Shelly Ann Fraser’s whose first medal was at the World Championships back in 2007 when she won silver in the 4x100m relay event has been the stand out performer in women’s athletics sprint events for the last 14 years.

The Jamaican added Olympic 100m silver to that collection at the delayed 2020 Olympics, finishing behind compatriot Elaine Thompson-Herah in the sprint final in Tokyo, but finished the season with a personal best of 10.60s, the third-fastest time in history.

The meet Director Barnaba Korir says the presence of the legendary Jamaican athlete whose medal collection has a total of 18 gold, 7 silver and 2 bronze medals in events ranging from the Olympics, World Championships and World Athletics Final among others is a big plus for the event that enters the third year.

“We have a big event lined up for next month, bigger than the previous two editions. I can confirm that there are a high number of entries that have expressed interest for our event,” said Korir.

Korir is confident that Africa’s highest-ranking one-day meeting, successfully established in 2020, will be able to host a big number of fans at the stadium with the other two editions having been held behind closed doors.

“We are prepared for the crowds. We are going to make this a very successful and entertaining event, and we are blessed and happy that this is the moment fans will be coming back to the stadium,” Korir said, adding that once again the country intends to showcase the top athletics talent from all over Africa along with those from other continents

He went on, ” We have support from the government of Kenya so that the security of the athletes and the spectators is catered for, of the numbers supersedes what the stadium can carry, definitely we have to have mechanisms to limit the number. On the other had we are going to have a small entry fees for the fans we be coming to watch the event,” he added.

On the other had Korir says they will soon be announcing who will face the home favorite Ferdinand Omanyala, who during the previous event last year clocked 9.77s to break Kenya’s 100m National record

“The men’s edition will equally be bigger than last year when top athletes like Trayvon Bromwel and Justin Gatlin competed,” added Korir.

Usain Bolt’s World Record a decade on: The science behind the world’s fastest man

On Aug. 16, 2009, Usain Bolt clocked 9.58 seconds in the final of the 100 meters at the IAAF World Championships in Berlin.

A decade on, with the eight-time Olympic champion now retired, that world-record time still stands.

At just 22, the Jamaican obliterated a mark he had set exactly one year earlier at the Olympics in Beijing, shaving more than a tenth of a second off the time.

Dr. Peter Weyand, a biomechanics expert at Southern Methodist University, told Omnisport what made Bolt so unique.

A slow starter?

One of the biggest misconceptions of Bolt was that, due to his 6-foot, 5-inch frame, he was a slow starter. Not true, says Weyand. Particularly on that night in Germany when only Dwain Chambers was ahead of him after the first few strides.

“The most unusual thing was how well he was able to start for somebody as big as he is,” Weyand said. “Normally the people that accelerate and get out of the blocks very quickly tend to be the shorter sprinters. The physics and biology of acceleration favors smaller people. In 2009, I think he started as well as anybody in that race. The start was a differentiator.”

Long legs = more force

Though his height may have given him a slight disadvantage out of the blocks, Bolt’s frame came in handy once the race opened up, allowing him to generate more power in the short steps sprinters take.

“What limits how fast a sprinter can go is how much force they can get down in the really short periods of time they have to do it,” Weyand said. “If you’re going faster, the only way to do what you need to do to pop your body back up with a shorter contact time is to put down more force. What all elite sprinters do is put down more force in relation to their body mass than people who aren’t as fast.

“If you’re Bolt and you’re 6-foot-5, you have a longer leg and you have more forgiveness. He probably has six, seven, eight milliseconds more on the ground.

“You have to put down a peak force of about five times body weight and that needs to happen in three hundredths of a second after your foot comes down.

“He was so athletic and so tall. His long legs gave him more time on the ground.”

Fewer strides, greater success

Believe it or not, sprinters cannot maintain their top speed for the entire 100 meters. Bolt, who also holds the 200-meter world record, had another advantage in that he needed fewer strides to cover the distances.

“He had 41 steps usually [over 100 meters] and the other guys are 44, 45, some of the shorter ones are up in the high 40s,” Weyand said.

“Particularly over 200 meters, the step numbers are directly related to fatiguing. If you go through fewer steps and fewer intense muscular contractions to put force into the ground, you have a fatigue-sparing effect.”

Unique, but not perfect

Given he was able to accelerate out of the blocks quickly — relative to his height — and was able to use his frame to generate more force across fewer strides, Bolt might have looked like the perfect sprinter.

But Weyand argued: “You can make a case that Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is the best female sprinter ever and she’s 5 feet tall.

“There are trade-offs in terms of being forceful when you accelerate versus having more contact time at your top-end speed.”

Will Bolt’s mark ever be broken?

No current athlete looks close to eclipsing Bolt’s time in the near future, but that does not mean his record time will stand forever.

In 2008, marathon runner and biology professor Mark Denny conducted research and predicted the fastest possible time a male sprinter could run is 9.48 seconds.

“Nothing’s ever perfect, Bolt’s obviously a unique athlete but no race is perfect and no set of circumstances are perfect,” Weyand said. “Certainly faster than 9.58 [is possible] but that’s a question that’s hard to answer without being pretty speculative.”

The only thing that is certain is for now — as has been the case for the previous 10 years too — the title of “the fastest man on earth” belongs to Bolt.

Source: sportingnews.com