Tag Archives: Sara Hall

Ruth Chepngetich wins the Chicago Marathon in style

World Marathon champion Ruth Chepngetich took the lead and never looked back at honors at the 43rd Edition of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon that was held on Sunday (10) in Chicago.

Chepngetich who took charge of the marathon when he dropped off his pacer earlierthan anticipated surge ahead cutting the tape in 2:22.31

The Kenyan was followed by three Americans who had a big day in off. Emma Bates came in second in 2:24.20 with Sara Hall closing the first three podium finishes in 2:27.19.

Keira D’Amato finished in fourth in 2:28.22 with Vivian Kiplagat from Kenya finishing in fifth place.

Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich target Chicago Marathon crowns

Kenya’s Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich head the fields for the Bank of America Chicago Marathon on Sunday (10), with Sara Hall and Galen Rupp leading US hopes at the World Athletics Elite Platinum Label road race.

After action in Berlin and London in recent weeks, Chicago is the next race in a busy period of major marathons and the Boston event follows just one day later. The weather in Chicago looks set to be warm, with temperatures of around 21°C expected for the start of the elite races at 7:30am local time.

The last edition of the Chicago Marathon in 2019 saw a world record fall as Kenya’s Brigid Kosgei clocked 2:14:04 to take 81 seconds from Paula Radcliffe’s 2003 mark. This time her compatriots Chepngetich, who won the 2019 world title, and Vivian Kiplagat are among the athletes in the spotlight.

Chepngetich sits fourth on the women’s marathon all-time list thanks to the 2:17:08 PB she set when winning in Dubai in 2019 and she ran a world half marathon record in Istanbul in April with 1:04:02. The 27-year-old was unable to finish the Olympic marathon in Tokyo but is looking forward to her US debut race in Chicago.

“I have never raced in the States and making my debut in such a great race like the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is more than a dream to me,” she said. “I will give all myself trying to run as fast as possible.”

Hall will be among those looking to challenge her. The US athlete beat Chepngetich at last year’s London Marathon, as the pair finished second and third respectively behind Kosgei, and Hall went on to run a PB of 2:20:32 in Arizona a couple of months later. Now she has her eye on Deena Kastor’s 2:19:36 US record, should the conditions allow.

“When I thought about where I wanted to chase the American record, I thought it would be more exciting to do it at home, in the US, and Chicago is such an epic race,” she said.

The other sub-2:25 women in the field are Kiplagat, the USA’s Keira D’Amato and Ethiopia’s Meseret Belete. Kiplagat, who ran her marathon PB of 2:21:11 in 2019, clocked 2:39:18 in Eldoret in June but showed her current form with a personal best performance in the half marathon of 1:06:07 in Copenhagen last month. Like Hall, D’Amato also ran a PB in Arizona in December, clocking 2:22:56, while 22-year-old Belete – who was sixth at the 2018 World Half Marathon Championships and ran a world U20 best of 1:07:51 later that year – has a marathon PB of 2:24:54 set when finishing fourth in Houston last year.

Among those joining them on the start line will be the USA’s Emma Bates, Diane Nukuri and Lindsay Flanagan.

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat With his PB of 2:03:55 set at the Milan Marathon in May, Kipyego goes into the Chicago race as the second fastest man in 2021. The 25-year-old made his marathon debut in Buenos Aires in 2019, clocking 2:05:18, and later that year he improved to 2:04:40 to win in Abu Dhabi, despite having started the race as a pacemaker. He also seems unfazed by the warmer than expected temperatures, simply replying: ‘No problem’ at the pre-race press conference when asked about the weather.

Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura, meanwhile, explained how he is not as comfortable in the heat but he will go into the race looking to build on the 2:04:29 PB he set when finishing fourth in that same Milan Marathon in May. He also has experience of the Chicago event, having finished sixth in 2019 in 2:08:35.

Rupp leads US hopes as the 2016 Olympic bronze medallist returns to action after his eighth place in the Tokyo Olympic marathon nine weeks ago and third-place finish in the Great North Run half marathon in 1:01:52 last month. Eighth fastest among the entries, his PB of 2:06:07 was set in Prague in 2018 but he will be looking to regain the crown he claimed in 2017.

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba is also a former Chicago winner, having triumphed in 2015, and he set his PB of 2:04:32 in the same city the year before that. The fourth sub-2:05 runner in the field is Kengo Suzuki, who broke the Japanese record with his 2:04:56 to win the Lake Biwa Marathon in February.

Kenya’s Eric Kiptanui is also one to watch. Having helped to pace world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge in the past, the 58:42 half marathon runner made his own marathon debut last year and improved to 2:05:47 to win in Siena in April. “I was so happy to run 2:06 for my first marathon,” he told NN Running Team. “What it proved to me was, yes, I was in good shape but that I had the mentality to perform over the marathon distance.” Looking ahead to Chicago, he added: “I aim to run 2:03/2:04 but my first priority is to win the race.”

Ethiopia’s Chalu Deso and Shifera Tamru have respective bests of 2:04:53 and 2:05:18, while Ian Butler, who is coached by former world record-holder Steve Jones and balances his running with his job as a teacher, is the second-fastest US runner in the field with a PB of 2:09:45 set in Arizona last year.

Dibaba, Tesfay and Assefa targeting first sub-2:20 at Frankfurt Marathon

Three Ethiopian have been added to the rich field of the 38th edition of the Frankfurt Marathon that will be held on October 20, 2018 in Frankfurt, Germany.

The race organizers are targeting the first-sub-2:20 run in the women’s race with the 2015 World Champion Mare Dibaba.

The 2016 Olympic bronze medallist has twice clocked 2:19.52, most recently in 2015 when she triumphed at the Xiamen Marathon. She was fifth in Frankfurt in 2010 clocking 2:25.27.

The 28 year-old will be joined by three compatriots who have dipped under 2:22 in 2018.

Another titls contender is the 24 year-old Haftamnesh Tesfay, made an impressive marathon debut in Dubai in January wher she finished fifth in 2:20.13, the fourth fastest time ever by a debutante over the distance. That performance should whet the appetite for what she can do in Frankfurt.

Meskerem Assefa has previous experience in Frankfurt. The 32-year-old finished third in 2:24.38 last year then made a solid improvement on her lifetime best when winning the Nagoya title in mid-March, running 2:21:45.

United States Sara Hall will be returning to race along the River Main. The 35 year-old who finished in fifth place a year ago in 2:27.21. She improved further to 2:26.20 this past spring in Ottawa.

“In terms of strength and depth, this is perhaps the strongest women’s field we have ever assembled,” said race director Jo Schindler. “So we are looking forward to an exciting and high-class race. With four such fast performers we could see times close to 2:20 or even faster.”

The course record of 2:21.01 was set in 2012 by Ethiopian Meselech Melkamu.

Out of the freezer, Into the frying Pan for Kawauchi at Gold Coast Marathon

A couple of months ago, as marathoners in the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games marathons battled sweltering conditions, Yuki Kawauchi ran to his first World Marathon Majors victory in Boston in wet, windy and freezing conditions.

This Sunday (1 July), Kawauchi is likely to face the rain again as he competes in the 40th edition of the Gold Coast marathon, an IAAF Gold Label event. But where runners experienced biting winds and slippery roads in Boston, mild and relatively still weather is forecast for race morning. It will be warm – with the temperature tipped to rise to just over 20C – but nothing like as hot as the Commonwealth marathoners experienced.

Kawauchi will be competing in his seventh straight Gold Coast marathon and chasing his second victory. His only win came in 2013, but he has three more podium finishes and has never finished outside the top eight.

Kawauchi will need to be on his A-game, however, as two other recent winners are in this year’s line-up – last year’s victor, Takuya Noguchi and race record holder and two-time winner Kenneth Mungara. Actually, there are at least five former winners starting in this 40th edition of the race – Eric Sigmont, winner of the inaugural race in 1979, and 1990 Commonwealth Games 5000 metres champion Andrew Lloyd, who won in 1980, are also in the field.

Takuya Noguchi prevails at the 2017 Gold Coast Marathon (organisers) © Copyright

 The women’s Gold Coast race offers the possibility of a home victory with two of Australia’s best distance performers at the Gold Coast Games among the chances. Jess Trengove was bronze medallist in the marathon and Celia Sullohern challenged for the medals in the 5000 and 10,000 metres. It probably reflects a pleasing internationalization of the race, but no Australian has won since Lauren Shelley took the women’s race in 2009 and no male Australian since Lee Troop in 2006.

Trengove has a best time of 2:27:01 in London last year and followed that up with ninth place in the London 2017 world championships. Sullohern finished sixth in last year’s Gold Coast race, slashing 20 minutes off her only previous performance, and then ran 2:29:27 to win the Melbourne marathon last November.

Abebech Afework, who set a race record 2:25:34 last year, is not back to defend her title. Fastest woman in the field is Agnes Barsosio (also known as Agnes Jeruto Kiprotich) with a 2:20:59 in Paris last year. Her recent form is solid, albeit less impressive, with a 1:11:00 half-marathon in Gothenburg in May. Ruth Jebitok, with a 2:25:49 from Barcelona this year, may stand a better chance of registering the first Kenyan women’s victory on the Gold Coast.

The Gold Coast race has been supported by many top Japanese runners over its history. The prodigious Kawauchi may be the highest-profile Japanese runner, but it is the women who have notched more race victories. Afework’s win in 2017 broke a run of five consecutive Japanese wins. Fastest Japanese entrant this year is Ayaka Fuijimoto (2:27:08 in Tokyo last year), followed by Miharu Shimokado (2:27:54 in Nagoya last year) and Mae Uesugi (2:31:49 in this year’s Tokyo race).

 Turning to the men’s race, the 44-year-old Mungara may feel the Gold Coast owes him a change of luck. He won in 2015 and 2016, the former in the race record and world 40-plus record of 2:08:42, and was thwarted in his bid for a hat-trick when Noguchi beat him narrowly last year in 2:08:59. Helped, no doubt, by his Gold Coast experience, he was selected for Kenya’s Commonwealth Games team but was one of those who wilted in the heat, finishing 10th in 2:25:42. His only other marathon for this year was a 2:13 in Hong Kong in January.

Fastest man on paper is Philip Sanga Kimutai, whose best of 2:06:07 dates back to 2011. He ran under 2:07 in each of the following two years and, while not as fast since, has run 2:10:07 or faster in three of the past four years. If time is passing him by, it is in no hurry.

Douglas Chebii and Michael Githae also will bear close watching. Chebii ran 2:08:43 earlier this year in Seville and Githae 2:09:21 in Lake Biwa. At 24 and 23, respectively, both are approaching their prime racing years.

Both the marathon and associated half-marathon are Oceania area championship races.

Trengove and Sullohern stand out as the top two contenders for the women’s marathon title with a big edge on times over any other entrant. The men’s race is a lot more open. Last year’s winner, Dave Ridley of New Zealand, is defending his title, but fastest Oceania man in the field is 40-year-old David Criniti of Australia (2:17:57), followed by London 2017 representative Jack Colreavy (2:18:32).

Collis Birmingham, Liam Adams and Dejen Gebreselassie should fight out the men’s half-marathon championship, though Jack Rayner is capable of a fast time based on his performances at shorter road distances.

Last year’s winner, Sara Hall, is back. As an American, Hall is not eligible for the Oceania title, nor is the other sub-1:10 entrant, Japan’s Hanae Tanaka. Laura Thweatt of the US, Sinead Diver and Ellie Pashley are next fastest, with the latter pair looking to have the Oceania title between them,

Kiptanui to battle Tsegay as he targets to defend his title

The men’s race at the 2018 Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon could prove to be very competitive as Ethiopian course record holder Yemane Tsegay returns to Ottawa to defend his title against last year’s champion, Kenyan Eliud Kiptanui.

Tsegay set the course record of 2:06:54 in 2014. Kiptanui won the 2017 event in 2:10:14.

Joining the two men will be 2016 Boston Marathon champ Haile Lemi Berhanu, who holds an impressive personal best (PB) of 2:04:33 and his Ethiopian counterparts Deriba Robi (PB 2:05:58) and Adugna Takeli Bikila (PB 2:08:51).

Tigist Tufa, the Ethiopan female course record holder (2:24:31), is also returning to Ottawa hoping to defend the title she also set in 2014. Tufa went on to win the 2015 London Marathon. Competing against Tufa will be her compatriot Gelete Burka, who boasts a 2:20:45 personal best from earlier this year, and crowd favourite American Sara Hall, who came in 2nd at the US half-marathon championships, on May 6.

Canadians to watch at the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon include Tristan Woodfine of Cobden, Ontario, who won the Banque Scotia 21k de Montreal (1:05.42) last month, 2017 Mississauga Marathon winner Lucas McAneney, and Lioudmila Kortchaguina who won the 2017 BMO Vancouver Marathon.

The 44th Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon will take place Sunday, May 27 at 7:00 a.m. (ET). The race will be tweeted live @ottawamarathon, and broadcast live on RunOttawa.ca and locally on Rogers-22.

About the Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend

The 2017 Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend welcomed more than to 43,000 participants in six races, including the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon, the Scotiabank Half Marathon, the Ottawa 10K, the HTG Sports 5K, the Ottawa 2K and Scotiabank Ottawa Kids Marathon. Runners raised $826,175 for 64 local and national charities through the Scotiabank Charity Challenge.

The Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend is one of only two running events in the world to host two IAAF Gold Label races: the Ottawa 10K and the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon. The 2018 Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend will take place on May 26-27, 2018.

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Tuliamuk wins USATF Half Marathon Championships

It didn’t take long for Aliphine Tuliamuk to re-establish her dominance on the USATF Running Circuit Sunday morning in Pittsburgh at the USATF Half Marathon Championships, while Chris Derrick claimed another national title with an impressive final surge late in the race.

The USATF Half Marathon Championships, hosted by the UPMC Health Plan Pittsburgh Half Marathon, are the fourth stop on the 2017 USATF Running Circuit.

Parker Stinson took to the lead in the early stages of the men’s race on a cool and overcast morning in downtown Pittsburgh. Followed closely by a large pack, including USATF Running Circuit overall leader Leonard Korir and three-time cross country champion Chris Derrick, Stinson set a brisk pace that thinned out the field early on.

Through the halfway point, Stinson continued to lead with Derrick, Korir, ZAP Fitness’ Andrew Colley, Sid Vaughn Jr. and Samuel Kosgei on his shoulder. That same pack of six ran together until mile 11, when Stinson, Derrick and Korir started to pull ahead.

With one mile to go, Derrick charged to the lead and started to grind down Stinson and Korir. As Korir fell off pace, Colley started to a push back into the top three. Derrick and Stinson would run well ahead of the field, while Colley moved into sole third place.

Derrick’s decisive move in the final mile proved enough, as he held off a furious final charge by Stinson, winning 1:02:37-1:02:38, both fantastic performances given the challenging layout in Pittsburgh.

Colley, who continued his charge back from a frustrating number of months dealing with injury, ran to a third place finish in 1:02:40, while U.S. Army runners Kosgei and Korir took home fourth and fifth place finishes in 1:03:13 and 1:03:24.

Korir’s fifth place effort earned him another six points, giving him a whopping 51 points in the current USATF Running Circuit standings, well ahead of second place Martin Hehir and his 24 points.

Nearly catching Korir in the final portion of the race, Matt Llano took home sixth place overall in 1:03:29. Just behind Atlanta Track Club’s Wilkerson Given earned seventh in 1:03:45, well ahead of Vaughn Jr., who ran with the lead pack much of the race before sliding to eighth in 1:04:27. George Alex and Johnny Crain finished ninth and tenth in 1:04:29 and 1:04:55, respectively.

While the men’s race offered a dramatic finish, Tuliamuk, in her trademark style, shot to the lead of the women’s race in the first mile Sunday morning and never looked back. Winning her eighth national title, Tuliamuk ran to a large lead by mile two, grew that lead over the next six miles and then held off a late charge to take home the victory.

The two-time defending USATF Running Circuit overall champion owned a 40-meter lead passing mile two, and seemed to add another 10-20 meters to her lead until she passed halfway nearly 100 meters ahead of then second and third place runners Sara Hall and Gwen Jorgensen.

Trailed closely by Rochelle Kanuho, Hall and Jorgensen challenged each other early on, packing together but keeping a close eye on the other and any dramatic moves they might make.

At the halfway point in the race, Hall surged ahead, working to catch Tuliamuk. While Jorgensen couldn’t cover the move, it gave Kanuho an opportunity to move up and run with Jorgensen for a bit.

Kanuho would eventually make her own move and run up to Hall, as the duo continued to push to catch Tuliamuk, but with little success.

Into the final mile, it was clear Tuliamuk would lay claim to another USATF Running Circuit title, while Hall put space on Kanuho and made one final push to the finish.

As Tuliamuk crossed the finish, her effort was met by an enthusiastic Pittsburgh crowd, cheering the HOKA ONE ONE Northern Arizona Elite runner across the finish in 1:10:04.

Unbeknownst to Tuliamuk, Hall made a late charge over the final mile, rapidly closing the large lead. Hall charged home, coming up just short of surprising Tuliamuk, finishing three seconds off in a runner-up time of 1:10:07.

After Hall made her late charge, Kanuho hung on to third place in 1:10:49, fending off Jorgensen in the final mile to earn a big ten points towards her USATF Running Circuit standings. Kanuho’s effort moved her up into fourth place overall with 19 points, 3.5 points behind Emily Infeld and Molly Huddle, but still well off Molly Seidel’s circuit lead of 33 points.

Jorgensen, making her debut in the half marathon distance, ran a strong race throughout, taking home fourth in 1:10:58, while fellow Portland-based runner Carrie Dimoff continued her impressive 2018 campaign by taking fifth in 1:11:51.

In sixth place, Samantha Bluske held off a strong challenge from Roberta Groner, finishing in 1:12:32, while Groner took home seventh in 1:12:35. Elaina Tabb also went sub-73 with her eighth place finish on 1:12:57, while Lindsay Flanagan ran 1:14:15 for ninth and Bethany Sacthleben placed tenth in 1:14:33.

The fifth stop on the USATF Running Circuit takes place next Saturday, May 12, as the USATF 25 km Championships take place at the Fifth Third River Bank Run in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Source: usatf.org

 

Korir to defend his title at USATF Half Marathon

Leonard Korir the defending champion leads an impressive men’s field into Sunday’s USATF Half Marathon Championships in Pittsburgh, while Olympic triathlon gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen makes her debut over the 13.1 mile distance and finds plenty of competition on the women’s side.

The USATF Half Marathon Championships, hosted by the UPMC Health Plan Pittsburgh Half Marathon, are the fourth stop on the 2017 USATF Running Circuit. Race videos, results, post-race interviews and photos will be available shortly after the race on USATF.

Korir, who won the USATF Cross Country Championships and USATF 15 km Championships earlier this season, leads the current USATF Running Circuit standings with a whopping 45 points, 21 points ahead of current second place runner Martin Hehir. While Korir did not finish at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in late March, the defending champion will look to get back to the top of the podium in Pittsburgh.

Looking to get his 2018 season going, while challenging Korir for victory, is three-time USATF Cross Country champion Chris Derrick. The Bowerman Track Club standout has had an up and down past couple years while dealing with injury, but a good block of training of late, including top eight finishes at the United Airlines NYC Half and Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile show he is in fine form.

The trio of Parker Stinson, George Alex and Matt Llano are also all capable of a top three challenge. Stinson in particular is having a fine 2018 season. The 26-year old has already run three half marathons this year, finishing each between 63:35-63:44, while he also placed second in the 10,000m at the Mt. SAC Relays last month.

For Alex, he’s raced sparingly in 2018, most recently placing fifth at the SACTOWN Run in early April, a race where Llano took third. Alex holds a half marathon best of 62:54, fourth fastest in the field, while Llano holds the third fastest in 61:47, sitting only behind Derrick’s 61:12 and Korir’s 59:52.

One runner to quietly keep an eye on is Hudson Elite runner Sid Vaughn Jr. Vaughn Jr. edged out Stinson in the 10,000m at the Mt. SAC Relays, finishing a half step ahead for the win, while also besting a strong field, including Alex, Llano and others at the SACTOWN Run last month. The 23-year old former University of Georgia runner continues to improve and impress.

Other notable entries include Korir’s U.S. Army teammate Samuel Kosegei, who placed fifth at the USATF Marathon Championships in December, ZAP Fitness teammates Andrew Colley and Johnny Crain, as well as sub-64 minute half marathon runners Ben Payne and Roots Running Project teammates Willie Milam and Wade Meddles.

Unlike the experience Korir brings to the roads, Jorgensen continues to make her transition from professional triathlete to professional distance runner and gives the half marathon distance a go Sunday. Jorgensen has shown some tremendous speed on the track, having run 15:15 for 5000m indoors, finishing only behind teammate Emily Infeld, while coming back to run 31:55 for 10,000m at the Stanford Invitational just over a month ago – where she beat NCAA champion Karissa Schweizer among others.

While Jorgensen is unfamiliar with the half marathon distance, the Bowerman Track Club runner did compete at the USATF 10 Mile Championships in 2016, where she placed third, coming back to place 14th at the New York City Marathon a month later.

Challenging Jorgensen up front are experienced veterans Aliphine Tuliamuk and Sara Hall. Tuliamuk, the two-time defending USATF Running Circuit overall champion, won four USATF Running Circuit races in 2017. While the former Wichita State standout finished third in last year’s USATF Half Marathon Championships, she’s ready to challenge for yet another win on the circuit.

For Hall, the California-based runner is in a similar situation, hoping to use Sunday’s race to prove she’s back to being a consistent contender on the USATF Running Circuit. Hall won both the USATF Marathon and USATF 10 Mile Championships in 2017, while finishing second behind Tuliamuk in the overall circuit standings (123-85 points). Both Tuliamuk (69:16) and Hall (69:37) hold personal bests under 70 minutes.

Saina lifts Marugame Half Marathon title

Kenya’s Betsy Saina took the top honors at the 72nd edition of the Kagawa Marugame International Half Marathon, that was held on Sunday (4) in Marugame, Japan.

Saina was part of a lead group of six led by Japanese national record holder Kayoko Fukushi that went through the downhill first 5 km in 16:15, a decent 1:08:34 pace aided by a tailwind. Saina accelerated to 16:00 for the next 5 km, and by the halfway turnaround the battle remained for two, Saina and Ethiopian Ftaw Zeray with the others forming a chase group that was led by 2011 Pan American Games gold medalist Sara Hall from United States.

Saina dropped Zeray on the uphill return trip and sailed on alone into the headwind to cut the tape in 1:09.17.

The second position was taken by Japanes Kaori Morita who blazed the second half with just over 1 km to go, holding on to finish in the runner-up position in 1:10.10 with third place going to  Zeray who crossed the line in 1:10.31.

The Japanese National record holder finished a disappointing 7th place in 1:13.17,while the two-time marathon world champion Edna Kiplagat dropping even further to 12th in 1:13.56.

LEADING RESULTS

  1. Betsy Saina  (KEN) 1:09.17
  2. Kaori Morita  (JPN) 1:10.10
  3. Ftaw Zeray    (ETH) 1:10.31