Tag Archives: RusAF

World Athletics Council prolongs suspension of Russia

The World Athletics Council has recommended the Congress of the global governing body of track and field athletics to prolong the membership suspension of the All-Russia Athletics Federation (RusAF) until all reinstatement requirements are met, World Athletics President Sebastian Coe said on Wednesday.

Addressing the World Athletics Congress meeting on Wednesday, Coe said that the organization’s Council recommended earlier the 53rd Congress “to maintain the suspension of RusAF’s membership until all the agreed conditions” were implemented.

World Athletics and RusAF

World Athletics, suspended RusAF’s membership in November 2015, following a wave of anti-doping rules violations and formed a special mission on the issue. World Athletics, however, allowed clean athletes from Russia to participate in international tournaments under the neutral status or the Authorized Neutral Athlete (ANA) until the membership of the RusAF is reinstated. The ANA status prohibited Russian athletes from participating in all international track and field tournaments under the national flag.

The World Athletics Council announced on November 22, 2019 its decision to extend the suspension of RusAF’s reinstatement process, based on charges brought by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU). According to World Athletics, the AIU charged RusAF on November 21, 2019 “with obstructing an investigation and provisionally suspended several senior federation officials for tampering and complicity.”

The provisionally suspended senior officials at that time were then-President of RusAF Dmitry Shlyakhtin and several more high-ranking people from the federation for helping to falsify documents, which Russian high jumper Danil Lysenko presented as his excuse for skipping doping tests.

In March 2020, the World Athletics Council ruled to fine RusAF $5 million for an alleged involvement of the previous executive administration’s attempt to forge official documents of high jumper Danil Lysenko. RusAF repaid the fine on August 12, 2020.

Source: tass.com

President Vladimir Putin orders Sports Ministry to settle reinstatement issues with WADA

President Vladimir Putin ruled on Friday that the Russian Sports Ministry as well as all of the involved national sports organizations must resort to measures aimed at the reinstatement of the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) with WADA and of the All-Russian Athletics Federation (RusAF) with World Athletics.

The Russian Sports Ministry is now set to present a report regarding RUSADA’s reinstatement process before March 30, 2022 as well as a report on RusAF’s membership reinstatement progress before December 26, 2022. RUSADA-WADA case The Court of Arbitration for Sport in Switzerland’s Lausanne upheld on December 17, 2020 WADA’s (the World Anti-Doping Agency) previous ruling on a number of sanctions against Russian sports.

In particular, CAS upheld WADA’s decision to declare RUSADA as non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code. The court, however, ruled to cut the previously proposed four-year term of sanctions to the period of two years. The Swiss-based court said in a statement on December 17 that the CAS Panel “unanimously determined RUSADA to be non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC) in connection with its failure to procure the delivery of the authentic LIMS data (Laboratory Information Management System) and underlying analytical data of the former Moscow Laboratory to WADA” in the period between 2012 and 2015.

The Russian authorities deny accusations of manipulation. CAS held hearings on a legal debate between RUSADA and WADA in the period between November 2 and 5, 2020. Appointed judges in the CAS case between RUSADA and WADA were Mark Williams (Australia), Luigi Fumagalli (Italy) and Hamid Gharavi (France). According to the CAS decision as of December 17, 2020, Russian athletes were deprived of their right to participate in all World Championships, Olympic and Paralympic Games under the national flag of Russia for the two-year period.

The national anthem of Russia was also ruled out to be played at international sport tournaments in the course of the next two years, including at the upcoming Olympic Games in Japan this year. The ruling of the Swiss-based court also stripped Russia of the right to bid for the organization of all international sports tournaments for the period of two years.

WADA’s sanctions will be in force until December 2022. World Athletics and RusAF World Athletics suspended RusAF’s membership in November 2015, following a wave of anti-doping rules violations and formed a special mission on the issue. World Athletics, however, allowed clean athletes from Russia to participate in international tournaments under the neutral status or the Authorized Neutral Athlete (ANA) until the membership of the RusAF is reinstated.

The ANA status prohibits Russian athletes from participating in all international track and field tournaments under the national flag. The World Athletics Council announced on November 22, 2019 its decision to suspend RusAF’s reinstatement process based on charges brought by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU). According to World Athletics, the AIU charged RusAF on November 21, 2019 “with obstructing an investigation and provisionally suspended several senior federation officials for tampering and complicity.”

The provisionally suspended senior officials at that time were then-President of RusAF Dmitry Shlyakhtin and several more high-ranking people from the federation for helping to falsify documents, which Russian high jumper Danil Lysenko presented as his excuse for skipping doping tests. Shlyakhtin submitted his letter of resignation on November 23.

Source: tass.com

Sebastian Coe: Russia ban no yet lifted

IAAF president Sebastian Coe said Thursday that Russia still has two pre-conditions to meet before they are allowed to return to international competition, despite the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) deciding to lift a ban on Russia’s anti-doping agency.

WADA controversially ended a three-year suspension imposed after Russia was accused of mounting a state-sponsored doping programme.

That in theory paves the way for a return to competition for Russian athletes.

However, the IAAF, which has banned Russian track and field competitors, insists they remain to be convinced.

The organisation’s taskforce will compile a report with a recommendation which will be presented to the IAAF Council at the beginning of December.

“The reinstatement of RUSADA (the Russian anti-doping agency) was one of three pre-conditions,” the IAAF said in a statement.

“The other two pre-conditions are Russian authorities must acknowledge the findings of the McLaren and Schmid Commissions that Ministry of Sport officials were implicated in the scheme to cover up the doping of Russian athletes as described in their reports.

“The Russian authorities must (also) provide access to the data from testing of samples at the Moscow lab from 2011 to 2015, so that the Athletics Integrity Unit can determine whether the suspicious findings reported in the Moscow lab’s database should be pursued.”

Coe said the outstanding pre-conditions will need to be discussed by the taskforce.

“The setting of our own criteria and the process of evaluating progress against these criteria has served athletics well over the last three years so we will continue to rely on the taskforce and our clear roadmap for RusAF (Russian athletics federation) reinstatement until we are satisfied that the conditions have been met,” said Coe.

Russia could be reinstated in December

Russia could be provisionally reinstated to international track and field competition in December if it meets certain conditions, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) said.

Track and field’s governing body suspended Russia in November 2015 after a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) report detailed widespread, state-sponsored doping in the sport.

Russia had hoped to be reinstated but IAAF officials meeting in Argentina on Friday unanimously upheld the ban and said that although Russia had taken positive steps in the right direction it had not done enough to merit inclusion.

“We have brought about change and it’s change that is very viable,” IAAF president Sebastian Coe said during the two-day meeting in Argentina’s capital.

“But we weren’t yet at that point where every element of that criteria had been met.”

Rune Andersen, the IAAF’s Russia task force head, said Russia have made “significant improvement” in achieving the requirements set out by the sport’s governing body.

“In fact, in some cases, they have gone above and beyond what is required,” he said.

Andersen, however, said three requirements had to be met before Russia could be readmitted to international competition.

Firstly, RUSAF (the Russian Athletics Federation) has to pay for costs incurred by the IAAF as a result of the scandal.

WADA must also reinstate the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA), which depends on the country acknowledging the findings that officials at the Russian ministry of sports orchestrated the doping of its athletes, and its cover-up.

Finally, Russian authorities have to give access to data from doping tests carried out at RUSADA’s Moscow laboratory from 2011-15.

“It would make a mockery of clean sport to reinstate RUSAF when the evidence required to resolve these suspicions, one way or the other, is still being withheld,” Andersen said.

WADA is communicating with Russian authorities to try to resolve these issues before the meeting of the doping agency’s executive committee in September.

“We hope there will be a breakthrough,” Andersen said. “If these points are resolved before the (IAAF) Council’s next meeting in Monaco in December 2018, then the Task Force would hope and expect to be able to recommend that RUSAF would be provisionally reinstated at that time.”

IAAF approves the application of Eight Russian Athletes to compete Internationally as Neutral Athletes

The IAAF Doping Review Board has agreed that the applications of eight Russian athletes have met the exceptional eligibility criteria to compete in international competition as neutral athletes in 2018 under competition Rule 22.1A(b) while the Russian national federation (RusAF) remains suspended.

In December 2017, the IAAF issued a simplified application process for 2017 Authorised Neutral Athletes to reapply for continued eligibility to compete in international competitions in 2018.

Since publication of the simplified application and updated guidelines under Rule 22.1A(b) in December, the IAAF has received 199 applications from Russian athletes.

A total of 67 Russian athletes have so far been declared eligible to compete as Authorised Neutral Athletes in 2018. 62 applications have been denied and 5 athletes have had their ANA status revoked. A number of applications have been withdrawn or were submitted out of time.

The Doping Review Board is composed of Robert Hersh (chair), Sylvia Barlag and Antti Pihlakoski.

As this is an ongoing process, the IAAF will only make announcements as and when decisions are made by the Doping Review Board concerning successful applications and those athletes have been informed.

2018 AUTHORISED NEUTRAL ATHLETES

Date of announcement and athlete/event:

3 July 2018: Mariya Aglitskaya (sprint hurdles), Timofey Chalyy (400m hurdles), Georgiy Gorokhov (pole vault), Ilya Ivanyuk (high jump), Timur Morgunov (pole vault), Vera Rudakova (400m hurdles), Yevgeniy Rybakov (distances), Fyodor Shutov (distances)

22 June 2018 – IAAF World U20 Championships and European U18 Championships: Oleg Braiko (jumps), Viktoriya Gorlova (long jump), Maria Kochanova (high jump), Elena Kulichenko (high jump)

22 June 2018 – IAAF World U20 Championships: Diana Adasko (triple jump), Elizaveta Bondarenko (pole vault), Ilya Dolbin (pole vault), Aleksei Fadeev (high jump), Aksana Gatauillina (pole vault), Elizaveta Kamenets (combined events), Stepan Kekin (combined events), Aleksei Kislitsa (discus), Polina Knoroz (pole vault), Polina Miller (sprints), Nikolay Orlov (javelin), Alina Sharkova (400m hurdles), Anastasiia Shkuratova (hammer), Olga Viktorova (400m hurdles), Valentina Ulianova (high jump)

22 June 2018 – European U18 Championships: Dzhennifer Akiniimika (sprints), Irina Boldyreva (sprint hurdles), Valeria Chehovich (400m hurdles), Arseniy Elfimov (combined events), Violetta Ignateva (throws), Dmitriy Kachanov (pole vault), Adelina Khalikova (high jump), Alexander Komarov (combined events), Vilena Komarova (combined events), Sergey Kozlov (discus), Iana Melnikova (discus), Maria Privalova (jumps), Olesia Soldatova (400m), Anastasiia Zui (400m hurdles), Sergey Zverev (hammer), Valeria Yakimenko (hammer)

12 April 2018: Kseniya Aksyonova (sprints), Vasiliy Mizinov (race walks), Sergey Shubenkov (sprint hurdles), Yana Smerdova (race walks)

21 February 2018: Maksim Afonin (shot put), Anna Krylova (triple jump)

2 February 2018: Ilya Shkurenev (combined events)

25 January 2018: Viktor Butenko (discus), Danila Danilov (hammer), Alexsey Fedorov (triple jump), Irina Gumenyuk (triple jump), Vyacheslav Kolesnichenko (sprints), Mariya Lasitskene (high jump), Aleksandr Lesnoy (shot put), Alyona Lutkovskaya (pole vault), Danil Lysenko (high jump), Alaina Mamina (sprints), Yuliya Maltseva (discus), Polina Miller (sprints), Ilya Mudrov (pole vault), Olga Mullina (pole vault), Sofiya Palkina (hammer), Viktoriya Prokopenko (triple jump), Anzhelika Sidorova (pole vault), Aleksei Sokyrskii (hammer)

Russian hurdlers banned for evading drugs tests

Two Russian athletes who refused to undergo drug tests earlier this year are among four more competitors from the country to have been sanctioned for doping.

The Russian Athletics Federation (RusAF) confirmed in a statement posted on their website that hurdlers Andrei Gapon and Denis Chernyaev have each been sanctioned with four-year suspensions, backdated to February 20, for “evading doping testing”.

According to Sports Integrity Initiative, the duo refused to be tested at the Russian Under-23 Championships in Saint Petersburg.

Javelin thrower Igor Nikolaev has also been handed a four-year ban, backdated to November 28, while fellow javelin athlete Alexei Tolokonnikov has been ruled ineligible for two years from January 31.

Both athletes failed tests but the nature of the respective substances has not been revealed.

None of the four athletes are among Russia’s leading track and field stars.

But, while the action by RusAF shows a desire for change, the lingering instances of athletes evading tests also brings cause for concern.

In January, 36 competitors suddenly withdrew from the Siberian Indoor Championships in Irkutsk, either due to an unspecified “illness” or for no given reason, when drug testers paid a surprise visit.

Earlier this month, the International Association of Athletics Federations also threatened to extend RusAF’s suspension after it emerged that top race-walkers from the country are still working with disgraced coach Viktor Chegin.

Chegin, linked to more than 30 race-walkers implicated in doping cases, has been banned from any involvement in the sport for life.

The IAAF warned RusAF their exclusion from the governing body could become permanent if they do not address the remaining problems.

Russian athletes are still eligible to apply to compete as “Authorised Neutral Athletes (ANA)” while the suspension remains in place.

RusAF announced that sprinters Irina Boldyreva and Viktoria Gorlova, long jumper Maria Privalova, discus thrower Natalia Shirobokova, high jumper Adelina Khalikova and pole vaulter Georgy Gorokhov are the latest to have made such requests this week.

But five race walkers have had their ANA status revoked by the IAAF for training with Chegin.

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