Tag Archives: Rita Jeptoo

Emily Jepkemoi beats Rita Jeptoo at Kakamega Forest Marathon

West Pokot’s Emily Jepkemoi beat former Boston Marathon champion Rita Jeptoo at the 6th edition of the Kakamega Marathon held on Saturday (26) in Kakamega, Western Kenya.

Jeptoo who last month was controversially denied a third place finish at the Standard Chartered Nairobi marathon due to confusion at the finish line was beaten to second by Jepkemoi who finished fourth at the Eldoret City Marathon when she cut the tape in a time of 2:32.57 with the latter coming second in 2:34.47.

Reigning Chicago Marathon bronze medallist, Vivian Kiplagat closed the podium three finishes in 2:37.07.

The 2011 World U18 Bronze medallist, Lilian Chemweno and the reigning Tallinn Marathon silver medallist, Naomi Maiyo finished in fourth and fifth place in a time of 2:40.34 and 2:40.43 respectively.

LEADING RESULTS

42KM WOMEN

  1. Emily Jepkemoi     2:32.57
  2. Rita Jeptoo             2:34.47
  3. Vivian Kiplagat     2:37.07
  4. Lilian Chemweno  2:40.34
  5. Naomi Maiyo        2:40.43

Athletics Kenya staring a ban

Athletics Kenya, athletes and athletic fans will be waiting patiently when World Athletics (WA) and Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) will be making an announcement whether Kenya will be struck off from competing in international events next season due to rampant doping cases reported by Kenyan runners.

With alarming doping cases reported in the country with top brass athletes, from track to field and road running, the country may face suspension or a ban for a period of time in order to put their house in order.

Our source, on anonymity request told Athletics.co.ke said: “ From the look of things its just a matter of when, because where we are now is at a danger zone. We may be suspended by AIU this year and this week might be the much awaited announcement. We pray that we be given time because of the efforts we and the Govrnment have put in to fight this menance,” he said.

He said that there are many top elite athletes that AIU is on their radar and soon they will be unmasked and this will be the end of their running careers.

“Many athletes and the country at large will be affected and it will be an expensive affair that will cost jobs and many lives will be affected directly and indirectly,” he said.

This year alone the country has had 17 athletes sanctioned by AIU for a range of doping violations with eight athletes currently on provisional suspensions, with the outcomes of their cases pending.

The newly appointed cabinet secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and the Arts, Ababu Namwamba, has been vocal on the intentions that government is going to take in the fight against the doping menace, “We are going to criminalise doping to levels you cannot imagine. We are going to be very, very harsh.

Ten Kenya athletes have tested positive since last year, for a banned substance called triamcinolone Acetonide, while two others from other nations tested positive for the same substance.

“It is a synthetic corticosteroid medication administered through injection into joints to treat various joint conditions. It is also used topically to treat various skin conditions, such as relieving the discomfort of mouth sores,” he said.

Senate majority leader Aron Cheruiyot is proposing a stringent measure to curb doping menace in the country to ensure that Kenyans run clean and regain the global reputation the country has been enjoying.

“Doping is one of the biggest issues that the new CS has to deal with, the fact that we reach a point where all our athletes will be screened more thoroughly than anybody else in the world. It is very terrible because it means that the glory that Kenya has enjoyed will be put in question and doubt because the world will see us as good at doping. That is really unfortunate,” said Cheruiyot.

The late Athletics Kenya president Isaiah Kiplagat in 2015, suspended Rosa Associati management stable run by Dr. Gabrielle Rosa and Gerard Van de Veen of Volare Sports.

Athletes who have been banned at Rosa stable include, three-time Boston marathon winner Rita Jeptoo, two-time world champion Asbel Kiprop and the 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong while at Volare Sports include Wilson Kipsang.

He said that the CS should also take on the agents in the country who are misleading young athletes by trying to show them the easier way into the global stage yet it is known that there are no easier routes to success and one has to sweat it out.
“As a country, we must re-register afresh these agents. Those that have been found to have athletes that have doped must be banned from this country because those are the people responsible for the mess that we find ourselves in,” he said.

Rita Jeptoo makes her marathon come back at Nairobi City Marathon

Three-time Boston Marathon champion Rita Bushenei Jeptoo made her return to running during the inaugural Nairobi City Marathon on Sunday 8th in the Kenyan capital Nairobi.

The former Chicago marathon champion finished in position six at the marathon dubbed Uhuru Classic in a race won by Agnes Barsosio on the fastest course.

The former queen of marathon returns into action after serving her two year ban by Athletics Kenya way back in 2014 for use of Erythropoietin (EPO), a banned substance by World Anti-Doping (WADA).

Despite her appeal, the Court of Arbitration of Sports (CAS) upheld an appeal from the IAAF against the leniency of the two-year ban given by Athletics Kenya on 26 October 2016 and instead set a four-year ban.

The 41-year-old athlete who was the oldest on the start list of the Uhuru Classic defied all odds as she fought for honors using her vast running experience on the road with her first race since her four-year ban.

The former Paris marathon winner made her return, enjoying her personal best of 2:19.57 she set in the 2013 Chicago marathon with a title.

The 2004 Milano City Marathon champion crossed the line in a time of 2:33.06.

The race was won by Barsosio in a time of 2:24.45 with Shyline Jepkorir Toroitich coming home second in 2:29.04 with Sharon Jemutai Cherop closing the podium in 2:29.37

Boston Marathon: All-time men’s, women’s winners

Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi and American Desiree Linden got to add their names to the list of Boston Marathon winners in 2018.

Kawauchi became the first Japanese men’s winner since 1987 and Linden became the first woman to win from the U.S. since 1985.

The Boston Marathon is the longest running marathon in the world. It’s been held annually since 1897. The first 69 years of the race were run by only men, with women starting to unofficially compete in 1966, then officially in 1972. The race, held on Patriots Day in the greater metro area of Boston, is also the first to incorporate a wheelchair division, starting in 1975.

Clarence DeMar holds the record for most men’s wins with seven while Catherine Ndereba has the most women’s wins with four.

Below is the all-time list of men’s and women’s winners of the Boston Marathon.

Boston Marathon: All-time winners

Men

Year Winner Country Time
1897 John J. McDermott United States 2:55:10
1898 Ronald J. MacDonald Canada 2:42:00
1899 Lawrence Brignolia United States 2:54:38
1900 John Caffery Canada 2:39:44
1901 John Caffery Canada 2:29:23
1902 Sammy Mellor United States 2:43:12
1903 John Lorden United States 2:41:29
1904 Michael Spring United States 2:38:04
1905 Frederick Lorz United States 2:38:25
1906 Tim Ford United States 2:45:45
1907 Thomas Longboat Canada 2:24:24
1908 Thomas Morrissey United States 2:25:43
1909 Henri Renaud United States 2:53:36
1910 Fred Cameron Canada 2:28:52
1911 Clarence DeMar United States 2:21:39
1912 Michael J. Ryan United States 2:21:18
1913 Fritz Carlson United States 2:25:14
1914 James Duffy Canada 2:25:14
1915 Edouard Fabre Canada 2:31:41
1916 Arthur Roth United States 2:27:16
1917 Bill Kennedy United States 2:28:37
1918 Camp Devens relay team United States 2:29:53
1919 Carl Linder United States 2:29:13
1920 Peter Trivoulides Greece 2:29:31
1921 Frank Zuna United States 2:18:57
1922 Clarence DeMar United States 2:18:10
1923 Clarence DeMar United States 2:23:47
1924 Clarence DeMar United States 2:29:40
1925 Charles Mellor United States 2:33:00
1926 Johnny Miles Canada 2:25:40
1927 Clarence DeMar United States 2:40:22
1928 Clarence DeMar United States 2:37:07
1929 Johnny Miles Canada 2:33:08
1930 Clarence DeMar United States 2:34:48
1931 James Henigan United States 2:46:45
1932 Paul de Bruyn Germany 2:33:36
1933 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:31:01
1934 Dave Komonen Canada 2:32:53
1935 John A. Kelley United States 2:32:07
1936 Ellison Brown United States 2:33:40
1937 Walter Young Canada 2:33:20
1938 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:35:34
1939 Ellison Brown United States 2:28:51
1940 Gerard Cote Canada 2:28:28
1941 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:30:38
1942 Joe Smith United States 2:26:51
1943 Gerard Cote Canada 2:28:25
1944 Gerard Cote Canada 2:31:50
1945 John A. Kelley United States 2:30:40
1946 Stylianos Kyriakides Greece 2:29:27
1947 Suh Yun-bok South Korea 2:25:39
1948 Gerard Cote Canada 2:31:02
1949 Gosta Leandersson Sweden 2:31:50
1950 Ham Kee-Yong South Korea 2:32:39
1951 Shigeki Tanaka Japan 2:27:45
1952 Doroteo Flores Guatemala 2:31:53
1953 Keizo Yamada Japan 2:18:51
1954 Veikko Karvonen Finland 2:20:39
1955 Hideo Hamamura Japan 2:18:22
1956 Antti Viskari Finland 2:14:14
1957 John J. Kelley United States 2:20:05
1958 Franjo Mihalic Yugoslavia 2:25:54
1959 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:22:42
1960 Paavo Kotila Finland 2:20:54
1961 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:23:39
1962 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:23:48
1963 Aurele Vandendriessche Belgium 2:18:58
1964 Aurele Vandendriessche Belgium 2:19:59
1965 Morio Shigematsu Japan 2:16:33
1966 Kenji Kimihara Japan 2:17:11
1967 Dave McKenzie New Zealand 2:15:45
1968 Amby Burfoot United States 2:22:17
1969 Yoshiaki Unetani Japan 2:13:49
1970 Ron Hill United Kingdom 2:10:30
1971 Alvaro Mejia Colombia 2:18:45
1972 Olavi Suomalainen Finland 2:15:39
1973 Jon Anderson United States 2:16:03
1974 Neil Cusack Ireland 2:13:39
1975 Bill Rodgers United States 2:09:55
1976 Jack Fultz United States 2:20:19
1977 Jerome Drayton Canada 2:14:46
1978 Bill Rodgers United States 2:10:13
1979 Bill Rodgers United States 2:09:27
1980 Bill Rodgers United States 2:12:11
1981 Toshihiko Seko Japan 2:09:26
1982 Alberto Salazar United States 2:08:52
1983 Greg Meyer United States 2:09:00
1984 Geoff Smith United Kingdom 2:10:34
1985 Geoff Smith United Kingdom 2:14:05
1986 Robert de Castella Australia 2:07:51
1987 Toshihiko Seko Japan 2:11:50
1988 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:08:43
1989 Abebe Mekonnen Ethiopia 2:09:06
1990 Gelindo Bordin Italy 2:08:19
1991 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:11:06
1992 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:08:14
1993 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:09:33
1994 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:07:15
1995 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:09:22
1996 Moses Tanui Kenya 2:09:15
1997 Lameck Aguta Kenya 2:10:34
1998 Moses Tanui Kenya 2:07:34
1999 Joseph Chebet Kenya 2:09:52
2000 Elijah Lagat Kenya 2:09:47
2001 Lee Bong-Ju South Korea 2:09:43
2002 Rodgers Rop Kenya 2:09:02
2003 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:10:11
2004 Timothy Cherigat Kenya 2:10:37
2005 Hailu Negussie Ethiopia 2:11:44
2006 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:07:14
2007 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:14:13
2008 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:07:45
2009 Deriba Merga Ethiopia 2:08:42
2010 Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot Kenya 2:05:52
2011 Geoffrey Mutai Kenya 2:03:02
2012 Wesley Korir Kenya 2:12:40
2013 Lelisa Desisa Benti Ethiopia 2:10:22
2014 Meb Keflezighi United States 2:08:37
2015 Lelisa Desisa Benti Ethiopia 2:09:17
2016 Lemi Berhanu Hayle Ethiopia 2:12:45
2017 Geoffrey Kirui Kenya 2:09:37
2018 Yuki Kawauchi Japan 2:15:58

Women

Year Winner Country Time
1966 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:21:40
1967 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:27:17
1968 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:30:00
1969 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:22:46
1970 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:05:07
1971 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:08:30
1972 Nina Kuscsik United States 3:10:26
1973 Jacqueline Hansen United States 3:05:59
1974 Miki Gorman United States 2:47:11
1975 Liane Winter West Germany 2:42:24
1976 Kim Merritt United States 2:47:10
1977 Miki Gorman United States 2:48:33
1978 Gayle Barron United States 2:44:52
1979 Joan Benoit United States 2:35:15
1980 Rosie Ruiz* Cuba 2:31:56
1980 Jacqueline Gareau Canada 2:34:28
1981 Allison Roe New Zealand 2:26:46
1982 Charlotte Teske West Germany 2:29:33
1983 Joan Benoit United States 2:22:43
1984 Lorraine Moller New Zealand 2:29:28
1985 Lisa Larsen Weidenbach United States 2:34:06
1986 Ingrid Kristiansen Norway 2:24:55
1987 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:25:21
1988 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:24:30
1989 Ingrid Kristiansen Norway 2:24:33
1990 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:25:24
1991 Wanda Panfil Poland 2:24:18
1992 Olga Markova Russia 2:23:43
1993 Olga Markova Russia 2:25:27
1994 Uta Pippig Germany 2:21:45
1995 Uta Pippig Germany 2:25:11
1996 Uta Pippig Germany 2:27:12
1997 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:26:23
1998 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:23:21
1999 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:23:25
2000 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:26:11
2001 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:23:53
2002 Margaret Okayo Kenya 2:20:43
2003 Svetlana Zakharova Russia 2:25:19
2004 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:24:27
2005 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:25:12
2006 Rita Jeptoo Kenya 2:23:38
2007 Lidiya Grigoryeva Russia 2:29:18
2008 Dire Tune Ethiopia 2:25:25
2009 Salina Kosgei Kenya 2:32:16
2010 Teyba Erkesso Ethiopia 2:26:11
2011 Caroline Kilel Kenya 2:22:36
2012 Sharon Cherop Kenya 2:31:50
2013 Rita Jeptoo Kenya 2:26:25
2014 Rita Jeptoo* Kenya 2:18:57
2014 Bizunesh Deba Ethiopia 2:19:59
2015 Caroline Rotich Kenya 2:24:55
2016 Atsede Baysa Ethiopia 2:29:19
2017 Edna Kiplagat Kenya 2:21:52
2018 Desiree Linden United States 2:39:54

(*) denotes disqualification

sportingnews.com

Asbel Kiprop should expect just judgment, says AIU Boss

Three times world 1500m champion, Asbel Kiprop’s doping case is expected to conclude with a fair judgment as his case has been referred to the DT. The head of the Athletics Integrity Unit spoke exclusively to Athletics News on various issues touching on doping in the country and globally.

Brett Clothier the head of Athletics Integrity Unit said that although there was no evidence of institutionalized doping in the country, it was still case for serious concern. He also mentioned on Kiprop that although the case is still under review by judges handling the case, AIU was determined to give him a fair hearing and conclusive judgment.

This comes in the wake of Kiprop insisting that the process to take samples from him was marred by irregularities starting with the anti-doping agents calling him prior to testing him which goes against their own internal regulations.

Secondly accusations of extortion from one of the officials have further tainted the whole process since it attacks the integrity of AIU as it goes about its global policing effort of curbing doping amongst athletes.

In May the AIU rejected claims his sample was tampered with and that testers had asked him for money.

‘I could trust them’ – what happened?

Kiprop was tested on 27 November 2017 in Iten, Kenya, having been told the previous night that doping control officers would be visiting.

Although that is against protocol, Kiprop said he did not take it as “something serious” because it had happened before.

The AIU said Kiprop’s sample was not tampered with but said it is “extremely disappointing” he was given advance notice of the test.

In response to Brett, Asbel said, “If at all I earn justice. I’m going to make the best out of my career. I have always not taken things so serious neither bring myself together to realize my full potential. But here I have learned that everything we do we gotta take every step as it counts because in every profession anything can happen anytime. If I earn justice. I will bring all my act together in order to realize my full potential. It will take me over another season to train and get a stable foundation but I believe I will be there. All I pray is to earn justice”.

Kiprop’s failed test dealt another damaging blow to Kenya’s reputation as a middle and long-distance running superpower. Dozens of Kenyans have tested positive for an array of doping substances in recent years. They’ve included big names, among them Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong, Rita Jeptoo, Matthew Kisorio,Agatha Jeruto and Lucy Kabuu.

Sumgong and Jeptoo tested positive for EPO and were banned for four years. Kisorio and Jeruto tested positive for traces of steroids and were banned for two and four years, respectively.

 

Kenyan politician calls for report into progress of anti-doping law following positive tests

A Kenyan Member of Parliament has called for a report on the anti-doping law as the country attempts to tackle a crisis following several positive tests in athletics.

Kathuri Murungi, a Member of Parliament for South Imenti, claimed an audit should take place to assess the situation.

Kenya introduced criminal laws as part of an anti-doping act back in 2016.

This included the creation of a national testing authority, Anti-Doping Kenya, while it made doping an offence which could be punished by imprisonment.

Revised legislation was published later that year after the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) declared the country non-compliant.

The changes led to them being made complaint again in time for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

Murungi reportedly called for the Ministry of Sport to do more to help tackle the crisis, asserting that they and Athletics Kenya need to better assess coaches for their credibility.

He also called for new policies to be introduced to boost Kenya’s reputation following the positive tests.

“The WADA has been issuing incessant sanctions to Kenya for non-compliance and delays implementing the laws pose a threat to our social co-existence and integration globally,” Murungi said, according to All-Africa.

“There are allegations that banned substances are used by athletes in the training camps and this is blamed on both local and international trainers.”

Currently, 18 Kenyans are suspended for breaches of anti-doping rules by the Athletics Integrity Unit.

This includes world 800 metres bronze medallist Kipyegon Bett, who was last week confirmed to have tested positive for Erythropoietin (EPO).

Three-time Boston Marathon champion Rita Jeptoo and Jemimah Sumgong, the Olympic marathon gold medallist at Rio 2016, are other high-profile Kenyan athletes who are currently serving suspensions for doping offences.

Reigning Olympic steeplechase champion Ruth Jebet, who now represents Bahrain but continues to train and live in Kenya where she was born, has also been suspended since February following an EPO failure.

A further four are provisionally suspended by the AIU, including Athens Marathon champion Samuel Kalalei, distance runner Lucy Wangui Kabuu and sprinter Boniface Mweresa.

A case is also pending against three-time world champion and Beijing 2008 Olympic gold medallist Asbel Kiprop after he tested positive for EPO in an out-of-competition test in November 2017.

The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) included the distance-running superpower on a list of nations most at risk of doping in July.

It came as part of new regulations by the IAAF Council which put more responsibility on National Federations to deal with the problem.

Kenya and Ethiopia were among four countries included in Category A – member federations the IAAF believe are most likely to have doping problems – along with Belarus, hosts of next year’s European Games, and Ukraine.

Athletics Kenya last week announced the establishment of an Oversight Committee as they seek to tackle the spate of doping cases involving their athletes.

There was a boost earlier this week when it was confirmed that a first East African WADA accredited laboratory had been approved.

Source: insidethegames.biz

Kipyegon Bett tests positive for EPO

world 800m bronze medallist, Kipyegon Bett has tested positive for banned blood booster Erythropoeitin (EPO), Athletics Kenya officials said on Friday.

Athletics Kenya Executive member Barnabas Korir, said they had received notification from the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) on Thursday that the 20-year-old had submitted a positive sample.

The AIU handles integrity and doping issues for the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

Should Bett’s B sample match his A sample, he will face a ban from the sport. He is already serving a provisional suspension for failing to submit to sample collection on August 15th.

“We had submitted defence for the case of ‘refusing or failing to submit to sample collection’ by today’s deadline. But last night, we received another notification about the new (EPO) case,” Korir explained.

“We have kicked off due process, accorded to every athlete as per the rules set by AIU. If the second test confirms the first one, then the athlete will have to face full consequences of the (anti-doping) law,” he said.

If his positive test is confirmed, Bett will join a growing list of Kenyan athletes to have flouted anti-doping rules. Milan Marathon winner Lucy Kabuu tested positive for morphine earlier this month. Samuel Kalalei, winner of Athens Marathon last November, also tested positive for EPO on June 4th.

Kenyan-born Bahraini runner Ruth Jebet, the 2016 Rio Olympic 3,000m steeplechase champion, and former Olympic and three-times world 1,500m champion, Asbel Kiprop, were suspended after their samples tested positive for EPO in February.

Other previous high profile Kenyan athletes who failed dope tests are 2016 Olympics marathon winner Jemima Sumgong and former Boston Marathon winner Rita Jeptoo.

 

 

Samuel Kalalei suspended for doping

The Athletics Integrity Unit has yet again suspended another Kenyan runner, the reigning Athens Marathon champion Samuel Kalalei.

In a ruling given today, the committee said Kalalei had tested positive for banned substance EPO and as a result was guilty of violating Article 2.1 of their anti-doping rules.

In a list provided on the Athletics Integrity Unit website, the 23 year old Kalalei has been listed as exhibiting prohibited substance in his body. The athlete has been in fine form clocking a time of 2:12:17 in the Greek capital of Athens. His fine form also saw him finish a commendable seventh given his age in Rotterdam in April in a time of 2:10.44

@AIU_Athletics has issued a Notice of Charge against Samuel Kalalei for a violation of Article 2.1 of the Rules. The is Provisionally Suspended from all competition. Find out more https://www.athleticsintegrity.org/disciplinary-process/provisional-suspensions-in-force 

 

This comes hot on the heels of Lucy Kabuu and Boniface Mweresa who have tested positive for banned substances in  span of two weeks.

We will update you on developing story as soon as we get information from the AIU.

 

 

WHO IS PROTECTING DR. GABRIELE ROSA?

Another soldier down is a common phrase among soldiers in combat use when one of them falls in battle.

This phrase aptly captures the recent doping cases involving Lucy Kabuu. Their case have one common denominator, they both hail from the Rosa and Associati camp.

One year ago we covered Dr. Gabriele Rosa in an expose detailing how his camp had over the years produced champions as well as the highest number of athletes found to have used enhancing drugs. The recent cases of Kabuu who joined Rosa’s camp in January tested positive for narcotic morphine in April. Until then, Kabuu had been an athlete competing honestly for over 15 years without any involvement with banned substances. It is not wrong to assume that her positive test can be linked to her joining the camp.

Hon. Wesley Korir former Boston Marathon champion had this to say about the latest doping scandal involving Lucy Kabuu from the Rosa camp, “I will be vindicated one day when I say that the biggest problem in Kenya doping menace is Rosa and associates and the only way to truly fight doping in Kenyans is to ban this agency from representing Kenyans. Ask when did Kabuu join this agency and immediately she is doping?

So the question to be answered is who is protecting Dr. Rosa? Why is this camp so important to Kenya despite the negative image it has painted of Kenya, a country that has been known as an athletics powerhouse but now every win is being questioned by the world?

Some of the high level names include Rita Jeptoo, Jemima Sumgong, Mathew Kisorio and Agatha Jeruto. The most recent high level athlete has been Asbel Kiprop. The coach under who these names were found to test positive for banned substances was Claudio Beraddelli.

In 2015 Athletics Kenya banned Rosa Associati and Volare Sports for six months as they investigated their roles in doping cases but were later lifted under unclear circumstances by AK.

Many questions arises about this man Dr. Rosa, how powerful is he that he manages to get his way through this doping issues? Has Athletics Kenya shielded the alleged peddlers of doping in Kenya, Rossa Associati, for a long time? Does Dr. Rosa fund Athletics Kenya? Does he have insiders at the IAAF that shield him and his athletes?

According to his website (www.rosassociati.it) the stable has 69 and 35 top notch athletes from around the world. The stable has names like Nijel Amos, Asbel Kiprop, Lonyangata Paul,Stanley Biwott,Lilesa Feyisa Gemeche,Belay Tigist Gashaw,Getent Tigest Mekonen,Yalew Genet and Jemima Sumgong just to name the few.

He has one of the biggest athletes stable in the world with the biggest names in athletics world from the likes of former world record holder and Kenya’s legend Paul Tergat to the current crop of emerging runners the likes of Tuei Sandrafelis Chebet a junior champion.

KENYA ON MOST AT RISK OF DOPING – IAAF

Kenya has been ranked the top most country likely to dope according to the IAAF. This negative ranking has come in the wake of high ranking athletes testing positive for various banned substances.

The top-tier athletes have included Asbel Kiprop who is the most recent high ranking athlete to test positive.

The 1500m Olympic champion and world champion, Rita Jeptoo the 3 time Boston marathon and course record holder, Jemimah Sumgong, Shieys Jepkosgei, Ken Kirui, and Sharon Ndinda Muli. Florence Chepsoi and Joseph Kariuki Gitau

Kenya is also ranked besides Ethiopia, Belarus and Ukraine. IAAF President Sebastian Coe said that the governing council has approved new regulations which spell out regulations for member states on how they can fight against doping.

Under existing regulations the burden was previously under the Anti-doping code and was focused on individuals as opposed to member states. The Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) recommended a raft of new regulations that will shift the burden to member federations and help clean up and shore up integrity in the sport.

The IAAF will divide member federations into three categories “which will have different obligations based on their level of success in athletics and the risk of doping”.

The current watch list of four member federations – Kenya, Ethiopia, Belarus and  Ukraine – will be folded into Category A, which will include those member federations considered “most at risk of doping”. The national team athletes from these federations will have to undergo at least three out-of-competition doping tests in the 10 months before a world championships or Olympic Games.

The second Category B will include the other Federations who are competitive at international level, while Category C will include Federations with very few international-level athletes.

Category A and B Federations will be required to ensure athlete drug-testing plans are submitted to the IAAF before each world championships or Olympic Games.

This new measures will either make Kenya get rid of dishonest athletes who are bringing the country much disrepute while ensuring athletes compete honestly.