Tag Archives: Nijel Amos

Emmanuel Korir gives Kenya its first Gold medal in 800m race

Kenya’s Emmanuel Korir gave Kenya its first gold medal when he won the men’s 800m final at the ongoing Tokyo Olympic games.

The 26-year-old athlete, who is the sixth-fastest 800m runner of all time, stormed to the front to take an impressive gold when he crossed the line in 1:45.ahead of teammate Ferguson Rotich who pulled 1:45.23 to take the silver medal.

Poland’s Patryk Dobek closed the first three podium finishes when he crossed the line in 1:45.39.

There was a big disappointment for Botswana’s Nijel Amos – the fastest man in the world this year over 800m – who finished eighth in 1:46.41.

There was always going to be a new gold medallist in the 800m, after double Olympic champion (London 2012 and Rio 2016) and world record holder David Rudisha withdrew from contention due to injury in May.

Emmanuel Korir beats Nijel Amos to win the 800m race at Continental Cup

Kenya’s Emmanuel Korir was it once again as he ran atactical race to claim the first position at the Continental Cup Ostrava 2018.

Korir beat his fellow African Amos Nijel from Botswana by fraction of seconds when he crossed the line in 1:44.50.

The 23 year-old Kenyan, who clocked the fastest time of the season of 1:42.05, at the London Diamond League in London in July and also took the Brussels meeting title in Brussels in August.

Clayton Murphy for team America’s came in second in 1:46.77 with Amos closing the podium three finishes with the same time.

MEN’S 800M – IAAF CONTINENTAL CUP OSTRAVA 2018

If Africa doesn’t win the men’s 800m there will be some serious questions asked.

The continent is fielding Emmanuel Korir, the Kenyan who clocked the fastest time of the season so far, 1:42.05, at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in London and who last Friday secured the IAAF Diamond League title by winning in Brussels in 1:44.72.

His teammate Nijel Amos of Botswana, 2012 Olympic silver medallist and still only 24, has run the second fastest time of the season, having clocked 1:42.14 two days before Korir’s 2018 best in winning at the IAAF Monaco Diamond League meeting.

That said, the Americas have a big chance of victory given the presence of 23-year-old Clayton Murphy of the United States, who ran 1:43.12 behind Korir in London and who demonstrated his ability to rise to the big occasion two years ago at the Olympic Games when he picked up a surprise bronze medal.

For Europe, Sweden’s Andreas Kramer has run a best of 1:45.03 this season, while his teammate, Poland’s Michal Rozmys, clocked a PB of 1:45.32 in missing out on a European medal by one place in Berlin last month.

For Asia-Pacific, India’s Jinson Johnson has a best this season of 1:45.65.

Kenya criticizes African team selection for Continental Cup

Athletics Kenya on Wednesday questioned why the men’s 4x400m relay team did not receive an invitation to compete in next month’s IAAF Continental Cup in Ostrava, Czech Republic.

The Kenyan quartet of Jared Momanyi, Alfas Kishoyian, Aaron Koech and Emmanuel Korir won the gold medal at the African championships in Asaba, Nigeria, earlier this month, but none of the athletes were included in the African team.

The Confederation of African Athletics (CAA) has named just three athletes for the four-man event: Botswanans Nijel Amos and Baboloki Thebe, and South African Phora Thapelo.

“We are surprised that none of our athletes have been included in the team for the men’s 4×400 relay, and yet the team won the African title in a championship record of 3:00:92,” Athletics Kenya president Jackson Tuwei said.

“We don’t know what criteria was used (by the CAA) to pick the runners to make the relay team.”

Kenya, which topped the standings in Asaba with 19 medals, including 11 golds, will be represented by only nine athletes next month, while former champion South Africa has the highest number of athletes, with 20 in the team.

The Continental Cup is held every four years since 2010, replacing the previous Athletics World Cup and involves teams from Africa, the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe.

Nigeria has 16 athletes; Morocco has a total of six athletes, while Egypt and Ethiopia both have four athletes on the team.

Cameroon, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Burundi, Swaziland, Uganda and Djibouti only have one athlete each on the team.

Source: AFP

TEAM SELECTION CRITERIA: IAAF CONTINENTAL CUP OSTRAVA 2018

Teams are beginning to take shape for the IAAF Continental Cup Ostrava 2018 with the start of the two-day competition, set for 8-9 September in the eastern Czech city, now just 30 days away.

While the final entries are still to be confirmed by the Confederation of African Athletics (CAA), the team for Africa will largely be based upon the finishes at the 21st African Championships which concluded in Asaba, Nigeria, on Sunday (5).

Several freshly-minted continental champions, including 100 and 200m winner Josee Marie Ta Lou of Ivory Coast, 400 and 800m winner Caster Semenya of South Africa and men’s 800m champion Nijel Amos of Botswana, are expected to compete.

For Team Europe, the defending Continental Cup champions, selection will be primarily based upon the results at the European Championships that are taking place this week at Berlin’s Olympic Stadium. Women’s 100m champion Dina Asher-Smith of Great Britain has already confirmed that she’ll accept the team spot, setting up an intriguing duel with Ta Lou as the pair share the 2018 world lead at 10.85.

Composition of the Asia-Pacific and Americas teams will be based upon athletes’ positions on the 2018 performance lists.

Each team will enter two athletes for each individual event and one team for each relay (maximum six athletes). Unlike the 2014 edition, there are no limits on the number of athletes entered from any one country. Additionally, at least three athletes from the host country shall form part of their continental team. Each team may also enter up to a maximum of three overall reserve athletes. The deadline for final entries in 29 August.

Additional information about scoring, lane draws and competing order can be downloaded here.

This year marks the third edition of the IAAF Continental Cup, the successor to ten editions of the IAAF World Cup in Athletics whose inaugural edition took place in Dusseldorf from 2-4 September 1977.

The IAAF Continental Cup Ostrava 2018 will be the largest sporting event hosted by the Czech Republic this year.

WHO IS PROTECTING DR. GABRIELE ROSA?

Another soldier down is a common phrase among soldiers in combat use when one of them falls in battle.

This phrase aptly captures the recent doping cases involving Lucy Kabuu. Their case have one common denominator, they both hail from the Rosa and Associati camp.

One year ago we covered Dr. Gabriele Rosa in an expose detailing how his camp had over the years produced champions as well as the highest number of athletes found to have used enhancing drugs. The recent cases of Kabuu who joined Rosa’s camp in January tested positive for narcotic morphine in April. Until then, Kabuu had been an athlete competing honestly for over 15 years without any involvement with banned substances. It is not wrong to assume that her positive test can be linked to her joining the camp.

Hon. Wesley Korir former Boston Marathon champion had this to say about the latest doping scandal involving Lucy Kabuu from the Rosa camp, “I will be vindicated one day when I say that the biggest problem in Kenya doping menace is Rosa and associates and the only way to truly fight doping in Kenyans is to ban this agency from representing Kenyans. Ask when did Kabuu join this agency and immediately she is doping?

So the question to be answered is who is protecting Dr. Rosa? Why is this camp so important to Kenya despite the negative image it has painted of Kenya, a country that has been known as an athletics powerhouse but now every win is being questioned by the world?

Some of the high level names include Rita Jeptoo, Jemima Sumgong, Mathew Kisorio and Agatha Jeruto. The most recent high level athlete has been Asbel Kiprop. The coach under who these names were found to test positive for banned substances was Claudio Beraddelli.

In 2015 Athletics Kenya banned Rosa Associati and Volare Sports for six months as they investigated their roles in doping cases but were later lifted under unclear circumstances by AK.

Many questions arises about this man Dr. Rosa, how powerful is he that he manages to get his way through this doping issues? Has Athletics Kenya shielded the alleged peddlers of doping in Kenya, Rossa Associati, for a long time? Does Dr. Rosa fund Athletics Kenya? Does he have insiders at the IAAF that shield him and his athletes?

According to his website (www.rosassociati.it) the stable has 69 and 35 top notch athletes from around the world. The stable has names like Nijel Amos, Asbel Kiprop, Lonyangata Paul,Stanley Biwott,Lilesa Feyisa Gemeche,Belay Tigist Gashaw,Getent Tigest Mekonen,Yalew Genet and Jemima Sumgong just to name the few.

He has one of the biggest athletes stable in the world with the biggest names in athletics world from the likes of former world record holder and Kenya’s legend Paul Tergat to the current crop of emerging runners the likes of Tuei Sandrafelis Chebet a junior champion.

ASABA 2018: Nijel Amos Makes it Three in a Row Amidst Controversy

Continental Cup champion Botswana’s Nijel Amos pipped Kenya’s Emmanuel Korir for his third consecutive Africa 800m title in Asaba, Nigeria on Friday.

Amos, won in one minute, 45.20 seconds to make it three in a row in a race marred by controversy.

The race saw the starter blast off before the athletes were ready, prompting some of them to stand still only to take off after the rest of the field was away.

The United States of America (USA) based Korir coached by the 1988 two lap race Olympics gold medalist Paul Ereng timed at 1:45.65 for silver.

Korir’s compatriots the 2014 World relays team champion Ferguson Rotich (1:45.91) and Jonathan Kitilit (1:46.88) finished fifth and sixth respectively.

Emmanuel Korir shifts focus to Africa Championships

Kenya’s Emmanuel Korir performance in London has left many fans dreaming of how fast he can run, but the 23-year-old says this week’s African Championships in Asaba, Nigeria, will be a major test.

The Kenyan excelled at the London Diamond League a week ago clocking a time of 1:42:05 in the men’s 800m, which stands out as the fastest in the world since 2012 and puts him sixth on the world all-time list, a front-running exhibition reminiscent of David Rudisha’s world record, Olympic gold medal-winning run on the same track five years earlier.

“I accosted Nijel Amos to see if he could run at the front to maybe like 600 meters, but he was telling me that he wasn’t feeling good,” explains Korir.

Amos had run 1:42:14 in Monaco in early July. “So I had to take a risk. I was feeling like maybe I could lose the race, but I thought, ‘no, let’s try it: I’m going to hold it’. And that is how it happened.”

Now his focus is on the Africa championships, which starts on Wednesday in Asaba, Nigeria. “Heats, semis and finals, it will not be easy,” says Korir, pondering a rematch with Botswana’s Nijel Amos. “1:42 is not satisfying. If I get some guys who are strong and can push me all the way to the finish line, it will be crazy.” Korir won the Kenyan title at the 400m distance.

Korir built a reputation on the U.S. collegiate circuit, where he went on an unbeaten run that lasted a year and included a world indoor best of 1:14:47 over 600m, and indoor and outdoor NCAA titles. That streak didn’t stop away from U.S. shores.

First he won the Kenyan trials, beating the likes of 2016 IAAF Diamond League champion Ferguson Rotich, to confirm his spot at the World Championships. Then, on his IAAF Diamond League debut, he destroyed a world-class field by more than a second in Monaco sizzling to a 1:43.10, the fastest time of 2017.

But the rounds in London proved to be too difficult. Although he won his heat, in the next day’s semis he came in fourth.

His undefeated season and World Championships campaign were wrecked. Talking from massage table 11 months on from that ignominy, his feelings couldn’t be more different. “Last year, when I was in London, I was so disappointed. But right now? I think I like it,” Korir recalls.

xinhuanet.com

Deng breaks Australian 800m record

Former refugee Joseph Deng has smashed the 50-year-old Australian 800m record at the Diamond League athletics meet in Monaco.

The 20-year-old Deng finished seventh in one minute 44.21 seconds on Friday night (early Saturday AEST) in a red-hot race won by flying Botswanan Nijel Amos.

The previous Australian mark of 1:44.40 was set by gold medallist Ralph Doubell at altitude at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics and equalled by Alex Rowe in Monaco 46 years later.

“It’s a great feeling,” said Deng.

“My target coming into the race wasn’t the record, it was just to run fast.

“I knew it was going to be a fast race. (Coach Justin Rinaldi) said to stick in the top five, top six position and see what happens.

“This is my last race of the season, so I’m done now.

“I’m back in Australia next week.”

Deng was born in a Kenyan refugee camp in 1998 after his mother fled the brutal civil war in Sudan.

The family arrived in Queensland in 2004, with Deng soon showing huge promise as an athlete.

He was controversially selected to run the two-lap race at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games in April despite not qualifying for the final at the trials, but justified the selectors’ faith by finishing seventh as countryman Luke Mathews claimed the bronze medal.

Since the Gold Coast Games, Deng and training partner Peter Bol – another Australian middle-distance runner of Sudanese descent – have been chasing the 800m national record in Europe, with Bol finishing ninth in 1:46.64 in Monaco overnight.

Deng’s new mark means that silver medallist Peter Norman’s 200m record of 20.06 seconds – also set at the Mexico City Games – is now the oldest one in the Australian book.

The most durable women’s mark is Charlene Rendina’s 800m time of 1:59.0 which dates back to 1976.

Deng also broke the Oceania 800m record of 1:44.3 set by New Zealander Peter Snell way back in 1962.

The race in Monaco was the fourth time in the past 47 days that Deng had dipped under the 1:45 mark – more than any other Australian.

Saruni Eyes Diamond League Trophy Champ Nijel Amos Scalp in Monaco

Upcoming  United States of America based Kenyan Michael Saruni will have a litmus test as he tests himself against the seasoned and experienced Botswana’s 800m runner, 2014 Commonwealth Games champion, Nijel Amos at the IAAF Diamond League leg in Monaco on Friday, July 20th.

Amos, the IAAF Diamond League champion and holder of the Prefontaine Classic 800m meeting record had been laid off by a calf injury he sustained at the recent Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia. 

Saruni a University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) second year student, made his mark in track and field history when he clocked the NCAA record time of 1:43.25 in 800m at the Desert Heat Classic in Tucson, Arizona, during National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) on April 28th.

Coached by the 1988 Seoul Olympics 800m gold medalist Paul Ereng,  time breaks the NCAA record previously held by North American U20 indoor record holder Donavan Brazier (Texas A&M) who ran 1:43.55 at the 2016 NCAA Championships. 

Saruni’s time ranks as the fastest in the world this year and breaks the school record held by former teammate Emmanuel Korir (1:43.73). depleted the NCAA record previously held by held by former teammate and compatriot Emmanuel Korir (1:43.73) for his season best.
Amos  finished second in his comeback race the Prefontaine Classic, which is a non-Diamond event, to gauge his body and strength ahead of the new athletics season after being beaten by Kenya’s US based Korir race after a disappointing Gold Coast’s Commonwealth Games showing.

The 2012 Olympic silver medallist from Botswana with a season best of 1:44.18, last year won his third IAAF Diamond League trophy – the most by anyone in this event. 

Amos a resident in the United States with Eugene-based Oregon Track Club Elite said during his absence on the track,  he did a lot of work during the winter programme.

Amos,  under tutelage of American coach Mark Rowland , pointed out that he would not want to push himself too hard.