Tag Archives: Monicah Ngige

Peres Jepchirchir beats stubborn Ethiopian at Boston Marathon

Olympic Champion, Peres Jepchirchir took the top honors in style as he beat her stubborn opponent, Ababel Yeshaneh from Ethiopia at the 126th edition of the Boston Marathon that was held on Monday (18) in Boston, United States.

Jepchirchir became became the first woman athlete to win an Olympic marathon gold medal, New York Marathon and Boston Marathon, when she cut the tape in a time of 2:21.01

The 28 year-old performed one of the greatest finishes in Boston marathon history in the women’s race as she edged out the Yeshaneh who seemed to be more strong with a finish kick but she did not match the quality of the sprint to finish from Jepchirchir who forced her to settle in second place when she crossed the line four seconds later.

The 2014 World Half marathon silver medallist, Mary Ngugi beat our veteran runner Ednah Kiplagat as she closed the podium three finishes in 2:21.32 with the two times world marathon champion coming home in fourth in 2:21.40.

Monicah Ngige, who made her marathon debut here last year, the 2021 New York Marathon silver medallist, Violah Cheptoo who is also the sister to 2004 Olympics 1500m silver medallist, Bernard Langat and World Half Marathon Silver medallist, Joyciline Jepkosgei came home in fourth, fifth and sixth place in a time of 2:22.13, 2:23.47 and 2:24.43 respectively.

 

Joyciline Jepkosgei to face Peres Jepchirchir at Boston Marathon

Tokyo Olympic Marathon champion, Peres Jepchirchir will lead a power-packed women’s elite fiend for the 26th edition of the Boston Marathon title that will be held on Monday April 18, 2022.

Jepchirchir, who won both the Olympic and New York City Marathons last year is the fastest women in the field that was announced by the race organisers.

“We are delighted to welcome the fastest and most accomplished women’s field in the history of the Boston Marathon,” said Boston Athletic Association president and CEO Tom Grilk through a statement. “Though there have been many milestones in the five decades since the women’s division was established in Boston, this field of Olympic and Paralympic medalists, Boston champions, and global stars will make this a race to remember on Patriots’ Day.”

The adidas-sponsored athlete has a personal best of 2:17.16 that she set in Valencia in 2020

There’s something uniquely special about the Boston Marathon, and I absolutely can’t wait to line up in Hopkinton this April for the race!” Jepchirchir will face off with the London Marathon winner Joyciline Jepkosgei who holds a personal best of 2:17.43.

Seven women have broken the 2:20 barrier with a dozen running under 2:23 mark, including reigning, the 2021 London runner-up Degitu Azimeraw of Ethiopia who holds a personal best of 2:17.58 and 2021 Olympic fourth-placed Roza Dereje of Ethiopia of pb 2:18.30.

In addition to Molly Seidel, the Tokyo Olympics bronze medallist will lead other top Americans like Sara Hall of 2:20.32, Des Linden (2:22.38), and Kellyn Taylor (2:24.28).

LEADING TIME

42KM WOMEN

  1. Peres Jepchirchir,           KEN, 2:17.16   (Valencia, 2020)
  2. Joyciline Jepkosgei,        KEN, 2:17.43   (London, 2021)
  3. Degitu Azimeraw,           ETH, 2:17.58   (London, 2021)
  4. Roza Dereje,                     ETH, 2:18.30   (Valencia, 2019)
  5. Zeineba Yimer,                ETH, 2:19.28   (Valencia, 2019)
  6. Edna Kiplagat                  KEN, 2:19.50   (London, 2012)
  7. Tigist Girma,                    ETH, 2:19.52   (Amsterdam, 2019)
  8. Maurine Chepkemoi,      KEN, 2:20.18   (Amsterdam, 2021)
  9. Sara Hall,                          USA, 2:20.32  (Chandler, 2020)
  10. Desiree Linden,               USA, 2:22.38 (Boston, 2011)
  11. Viola Cheptoo,                KEN, 2:22.44  (New York City, 2021)
  12. Purity Changwony,         KEN, 2:22.46   (Ampugnano, 2021)
  13. Charlotte Purdue,           GBR, 2:23.26   (London, 2021)
  14. Kellyn Taylor,                   USA, 2:24.28   (Duluth, 2018)
  15. Molly Seidel,                    USA, 2:24.42   (New York City, 2021)
  16. Malindi Elmore               CAN, 2:24.50  (Houston, 2020)
  17. Mary Ngugi,                     KEN, 2:25.20  (Boston, 2021)
  18. Monicah Ngige,               KEN, 2:25.32  (Boston, 2021)

Diana Kipyogei runs away with Boston Marathon title

Kenya’s Diana Chemtai Kipyogei won her first major marathon as she ran away with the 25th edition of the Boston Marathon title that was held on Monday (11) in Boston.

The 27-year-old had only run two other marathons heading into Monday’s race, winning the 2020 Istanbul Marathon and placing third at the 2019 Ljubljani Marathon.

The race began at the 8 miles in, when Kipyogei surged ahead. Netsanet Gudeta of Ethiopia, a former world cross-country champion, went after her and caught her within a few miles but at 24 miles, after the two had run side by side, it was Kipyogei who again took the lead. The veteran Edna Kiplagat of Kenya, a pre-race favorite and a two-time world champion as well as a New York and Boston winner, soon caught Gudeta and gave chase to Kipyogei. She gained some time but could not close the whole gap.

Kipyogei kept her pace pace intact to lead 1-2-3 Kenyan podium finish as she cut the tape in 2:24.50 with Ednah forced to settle in second place in 2:25.09.

Mary Ngugi came closed the podium three first finishes when she crossed the line in 2:25.20 with Monicah Ngige also from Kenya finishing in fourth in 2:25.32.

United States Nell Rojas was the top American finisher, placing sixth with a time of 2:27.12.

Monicah Ngige and Caroline Chepkoech make their marathon debut in Boston

Kenya’s Monicah Ngige will be making her marathon debut at the 125th edition of the Boston Marathon that will be held from Hopkinton to Boston on Monday, October 11 in Boston.

The 27 year-old who has 14 career wins had great success on the roads of Boston in 2019, winning the B.A.A. 5K, finishing third at the B.A.A. Half Marathon, and sixth at the B.A.A. 10K.

Ngige comes to this race with a personal best of 1:07.29 that she got in 2019 at the Aramco Houston Half Marathon, where she finished in fourth place.

Ngige will face another debutant Kenyan born but now trading for Kazakhstan Caroline Chepkoech.

Chepkoech is a two times African champion who is trained by two coaches Ken Rotich from Kenya and Richards Anderson from the United States. She holds a personal best of 1:05.07 that she got at the 2018 Ras Al Khaimah International Half Marathon. This time placed her as the fourth fastest female half marathoner of all time.

The two will face seven international athletes who have run sub-2:22 during their careers led by Ethiopia’s Yebrgual Melese (2:19.36), Mare Dibaba (2:19.52), Workenesh Edesa (2:20.24), Sutume Kebede (2:20.30), and Sutume Kebede (2:20.30). The top Kenyans are Ednah Kiplagat, the 2017 women’s race champion (2:19.50), and Helah Kiprop (2:21.27).

Edna Kiplagat leads the elite field at Boston Marathon

The 2017 Boston marathon winner Edna Kiplagat from Kenya who is now based in United States will lead the women elite field at the 125th Boston Marathon that will be held from Hopkinton to Boston on Monday, October 11 in Boston.

This will be the first-ever fall edition of the Boston Marathon which will feature more than 140 elite athletes across all divisions including dozens of Americans, the Boston Athletic Association and John Hancock Financial jointly announced today.

The Organizers of the world’s oldest marathon, which could not be held as an in-person event in 2020 due to the pandemic and the local authorities, have permitted a field of 20,000 runners, and up to 70,000 more will run a virtual edition of the race. An $876,500 prize money purse will be on offer, the second largest in the history of the race.

Tom Grilk who is the B.A.A. president and CEO said, “In October, many of the world’s best athletes will look to etch their names in the history books by winning the Boston Marathon, We very much look forward to October’s competition, bringing together winners from more than one hundred global marathons. The B.A.A. is eager to continue the tradition of athletic excellence as we return to the roads leading to Boston.”

As usual the elite field in the open divisions is dominated by Africans. On the women’s side, eight international athletes have run sub-2:22 during their careers led by Ethiopia’s Yebrgual Melese (2:19:36), Mare Dibaba (2:19:52), Workenesh Edesa (2:20:24), Sutume Kebede (2:20:30), and Sutume Kebede (2:20:30). The top Kenyans are Kiplagat, the 2017 women’s race champion (2:19:50), and Helah Kiprop (2:21:27). Caroline Chepkoech, a former Kenyan who now runs for Kazakhstan, is making her debut.

The top American women are Jordan Hasay (2:20:57), Des Linden (2:22:38), and Molly Huddle (2:26:33). Hasay made her marathon debut at Boston in 2017, finishing third in 2:23:00. Linden has run Boston seven times and won the wet, cold and windy edition in 2018 (she was also second in 2011). Like Linden, Huddle ran Boston in 2018 and finished 13th. Ten of the 27 elite women who started that year dropped out.

The two defending champions, Kenya’s Lawrence Cherono and Ethiopia’s Worknesh Degefa, are not in this year’s elite field.

 OPEN DIVISIONS
 International Women:

Yebrgual Melese   (ETH), 2:19:36

Edna Kiplagat        (KEN), 2:19:50

Mare Dibaba          (ETH), 2:19:52

Workenesh Edesa (ETH), 2:20:24

Sutume Kebede    (ETH),  2:20:30

Besu Sado             (ETH), 2:21:03

Helah Kiprop         (KEN), 2:21:27

Bedatu Hirpa         (ETH), 2:21:32

Atsede Baysa        (ETH), 2:22:03

Diana Chemtai      (KEN), 2:22:06

Biruktayit Eshetu   (ETH), 2:22:40

Tigist Abayechew  (ETH), 2:22:45

Purity Changwony (KEN), 2:22:46

Caroline Rotich          (KEN), 2:23:22

Mary Ngugi                (KEN), 2:27:36

Shiho Kaneshige       (JPN),  2:28:51

Netsanet Gudeta        (ETH), 2:29:15

Kellys Arias                (COL), 2:29:36

Tish Jones                 (GBR), 2:31:00

Brittany Moran        (CAN), 2:36:22

Marie-Ange Brumelot (FRA), 2:36:23

Caroline Chepkoech    (KAZ), Debut (1:05:07 Half)

Monicah Ngige             (KEN), Debut (1:07:29 Half)

 

 

 

 

Wacera equals Ndereba’s record as she lifts Boilermaker 15K Race

Kenya’s Mary Wacera put a spirited fight as she won for the fourth time the 41st edition of the Boilermaker 15K race that was held on Sunday (8) in Utica, New York.

The 29 year-old led a 1-4 Kenyan podium finish as she out kicked her closest rival Monicah Ngige to cut the tape in 50:01 making it her fourth Boilermaker win and to equal her win with Catherine Ndereba who won the title in 1996,1999,2000 and 2001.

Ngige took second place two seconds later as Vicoty Chepngeno closed the first three podium finishes in 50:04.

Delvine Meringor finished in fourth place as Ethiopia’s Buze Kejela finished fourth in 50:05 and 50:08 respectively.

The course record that was set in 2010 by Kenya’s Ednah Kiplagat remains intact.

LEADING RESULTS

WOMEN

  1. Mary Wacera            (KEN) 50:01
  2. Monicah Ngige        (KEN) 50:03
  3. Vicoty Chepngeno  (KEN) 50:04
  4. Delvine Meringor    (KEN) 50:05
  5. Buze Diriba Kejela   (ETH) 50:08

Mkungo and Ngige win the Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon

Kenya’s Panuel Mkungo and Monicah Ngige took honors at the 28th edition of the Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon that was held on Saturday (16) in Duluth, Minnesota, United States.

Mkungo who hails from Eldoret wasn’t thrilled with a fourth-place finish a year ago and was determined to make amends.

The 24 year-old broke from a three-runner group just past nine miles and powered away to cut the tape in 1:02.50.

“After last year, I was not happy. I said, ‘I have to come back and win this race,’ ” said Mkungo, who ran 1:03.45 in 2017. “I was slowed a little bit [Saturday] because of the weather. I was cold; I was not getting warm. My target was to run 1:01.”

United States Fernando Cabada took second in 1:03.22.

In the women race Ngige who had been recently told by her sponsor, Nike, that if she improves on her race times that would mean a paycheck, not just shoes and clothes. She took that to heart and pushed herself to the limit to cut the tape in a new personal best of 1:09.55.

Monicah Ngige wins the 2018 Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon. Photo: Race Organisers

“They give me the Nike gear, but they give me the option (to make money),” she explained. “If you run this half-marathon, get a good time, then they pay me. I hope they (are pleased with the result).”

The winners both earned $3,000.

Kipruto targets World Junior Championships

Rhonex Kipruto is set to take part in the 2018 World Junior Championships in July after winning New York Road Runners 10km race on Sunday.

Kipruto clocked 27:08 smashing 27:35 course record set by Leornard Komon in 2011 and setting the fastest 10K record on the US soil.

His coach Brother Colm O’Connel disclosed that Kipruto will take part in the competition that will go down in Tampere, Finland.

“Our goal is to ensure Kipruto makes it to the Kenyan team to World Junior Championships. He will be competing in the 10,000 metres race,” Colm said.

Colm said Kipruto’s preparation for the junior competition will be done through well-spaced races ahead of the world competition.

The 18-year-old 2018 U-20 African cross country champion and his training compatriot Mathew Kimeli scooped the first and second places in the New York’s Central Park duel. Kimeli cut the tape in 27:19 ahead of Teshome Mekonen, who clocked 28:10 to take the third position. The duo’s win put Iten in the spot light and more so Brother Colm, who described the winner as the world’s new stars. “Kipruto and Kimeli will represent the country in the 2020 Olympic Games in Japan if stay focused,” Colm said.

Colm has trained Kipruto and Kimeli for four and six years respectively in the country’s oldest athletics training camp at St. Patrick’s High School Iten.

“It is a fantastic encouragement. It motivates me to nurture more athletes and it gives credibility to my programme,” Colm said about performance.

He said the duo have demonstrated consistency in their performances throughout their junior athletics duels. Kipruto pocketed Sh3 million for breaking the course record and an additional Sh1 million for the win. Kipruto and Kimeli comes from Keiyo South, Elgeyo Marakwey county.

Diriba Mergia from Ethiopia clocked 32:04 to win the women’s 10K race, beating Monicah Ngige (32:15) of Kenya and Ethiopian Sinke Dessie Biyadgilgn (32:56).