Tag Archives: Letesenbet Gidey

NN Zevenheuvelenloop Road Race cancelled

World famous 15km Road race better known as the NN Zevenheuvelenloop (Seven Hills Run) in Nijmegen has been cancelled due to rising COVID-19 cases in the Netherlands.

The organizers of the race where the world best times for both men and women were set, were ready to make a triumphant return on Sunday 21 November in Netherlands after a two-year hiatus, but were forced to cancel the race only yesterday.

“We really did everything we could to set up a safe NN Zevenheuvelenloop,” said Alexander Vandevelde the director of the Zevenheuvelenloop Foundation in a statement. “Our gratitude goes out to the municipality of Nijmegen for all their efforts and of course also to everyone who supported us until the last moment in our search for a safe edition. We sympathize with the disappointed runners who were looking forward to our fall classic.”

The NN Zevenheuvelenloop was founded in 1984 and has consistently been one of the world’s most competitive road races. Past champions include Ethiopia’s Haile Gebreselasie, Tirunesh Dibaba and Sileshi Sihene (three victories each); Kenya’s Tegla Loroupe (3 wins), and Scotland’s Liz McColgan (1 win).

Chepetegei stepped his first foot at the Nijmegen in 2015, where he was still a relatively unknown athlete when he won the very stormy edition and he went on to set the record and becoming Mr. Zevenheuvelen  and the only athlete to win four times; the 2016, 2017 and the 2018 edition consecutively. He was scheduled to run this year’s race.

Letesenbet Gidey: First and Only woman to hold 4 World Records simultaneously

She remains a unique women athlete on the globe, breaking all records before her as she holds four world records under her medal cabinet.

Ethiopian Letesenbet Gidey remains a woman of all firsts after shooting into the limelight in 2015 when she won the World Cross Country Junior Championships in Guiyang, China.

Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia Wins the World Cross Country junior title in 2015. PHOTO: Getty Images

Born and raised in the troubled Endameskel, aged 17 years, she made her name known across the globe when she won the world cross country junior title for her nation.

She went ahead to win bronze at the 2019 World Cross Country Championships behind the champion Hellen Obiri and her country mate Dera Dida.

At 21, she won silver in 10,000m at the 2019 event with her personal best of 30:21.23 in a race that was won by Sifan Hassan from the Netherlands who also ran a world lead with the late Agnes Jebet Tirop winning bronze.

In the same year Gidey went on produced again one of her fastest time ever in the Outdoor 3000m race that was held in Palo Alto, California where she set a National Record of 8:20.27.

Letesenbet Gidey destroyed women’s 15km World record at the annual Zevenheuvelenloop in Nijmegen, Netherlands. PHOTO: NN Running Team

The Ethiopian went on rampage in November 2019 setting a new world record of 44:20 in the 15K run at the Zevenheuvelenloop road race in Nijmegen, Netherlands, breaking the previous world record held by Joyciline Jepkosgei that she had set in 2017 by more than a minute, and becoming the first woman to run 15K under 45 minutes.

Having four titles as a junior, she went to 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games with a mission to be on the podium and she did with a bronze in the 10,000m behind Sifan Hassan with Bahrain’s Kalkidan Gezahegne (the current 10Km world record holder though not ratified) taking the silver.

Letesenbet Gidey Shatters 5000 World Record Valencia. PHOTO NN RUNNING TEAM

With just six years since 2015, Gidey has written her name in four world record events she smashed her first world 5,000m record during the 2020 in 14:06.62 and this summer she went ahead and shattered the world record in the 10,000 meters in Hengelo, Netherlands. She is the first woman since Ingrid Kristiansen from 1986-1993 to hold them both simultaneously.

Letesenbet Gidey poses for after breaking the world record in women’s 10,000m. PHOTO: COURTESY

Gidey obliterated the women’s half marathon world record in her debut at the distance, winning the Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso in 1:02.52. The Ethiopian’s performance improved on the previous world record of 1:04.02 that had been set by Ruth Chepngetich in Istanbul in April—by 70 seconds. This was the third world record the 23-year-old has broken in the last year.

Gidey’s winning time of 1:02.52 marks the first time a woman has ever run faster than the 64 and 63-minute barrier for the half marathon distance.

To put Gidey’s time into perspective, according to World Athletics scoring tables, 62:02 equates to approximately a 13:50 5K, 29-minute 10K and a 2:11 marathon.

Her performance in the half-marathon surpassed both of her previous records. It also indicates that if she moves up to the marathon, she’ll be a strong contender to take down that record as well, which is currently held by Brigid Kosgei at 2:14:04.

This time shows the projections of what someone could run at different distances based on that performance. Her actual splits on that day were no less impressive, however, and she went through 5K in 15:00, sped up over the next 5K to split 29:45 for 10K and went through 15K in 44:29. This 15K time is remarkable, considering it is only nine seconds slower than her own 15K world record.

Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey smashes the World Half Marathon record at the Valencia Half Marathon. PHOTO: Getty Images

Letesenbet Gidey smashes the World Half Marathon Record at Valencia Half Marathon

Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey smashed the World Half Marathon record at the Valencia Half Marathon that was held on Sunday (24) in Valencia.

Gidey smashed the previous record of world record of 1:04.02 set by Ruth Chepngetich from Kenya early this year at the Istanbul Half Marathon when she cut the tape in a world record of 1:02.52.

She 1-2 Ethiopian podium finish as she was followed by Yalemzerf Yehualaw who also crossed the line below the previous World record with a 1:03.51.

Kenya’s Sheila Chepkirui closed the first three podium finishes in a time of  1:04.54.

The Valencia Half Marathon becomes the only race that currently holds the world record for women and men for the same distance, since Kibiwott Kandie’s mark, 57:32 that he set in the 2020 Edition still intact

Letesenbet Gidey and Yalemzerf Yehualaw target world half marathon record in Valencia

The Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso EDP witnessed a men’s world record last year as Kibiwott Kandie ran a stunning 57:32. This time the women’s world record is the target and organisers have assembled a star-studded line-up for the World Athletics Elite Label road race on Sunday (24).

Ethiopians Letesenbet Gidey and Yalemzerf Yehualaw will clash in a long-awaited showdown. Gidey is the world 5000m and 10,000m record-holder, while Yehualaw ran 1:03:44 in August, and although that time will not be ratified as a world half marathon record the two athletes will now go head-to-head in Valencia as they target the 1:04:02 run by Ruth Chepngetich in Istanbul in April, a mark which is pending world record ratification.

The 23-year-old Gidey has competed sparingly this year but managed to set a world 10,000m record by running 29:01.03 in Hengelo before claiming bronze at the Tokyo Olympics.

While the diminutive Yehualaw is an accomplished half marathon specialist, with nine outings over the last three seasons, Gidey will tackle the distance for the first time but her impressive 44:20 world best for the 15km set in Nijmegen in 2019 suggests she might become the first debutante to set a world record for the distance.

Reportedly, each of the Ethiopian aces will be joined by their respective pacemakers – Mebrahtu Kiros and Genetu Molalign – in a battle which promises to be fierce, while the organisers will provide an official pacemaker for the rest of the elite targeting a 1:05 clocking.

That second group looks set to be led by Ethiopia’s Senbere Teferi, the winner in 2019 thanks to a 1:05:32 time; her compatriot Hawi Feysa, fresh from a 1:05:41 PB in Copenhagen last month; Sheila Chepkirui, runner-up last year in a career best of 1:05:39; and her fellow Kenyan Brenda Jepleting, a 1:06:52 performer.

After last year’s climax, when no fewer than four men ran inside the then world record of 58:01, one of them – Rhonex Kipruto – will be the marquee athlete this time.

The Kenyan star, who clocked a 57:49 debut last year, also excelled in Valencia in January 2020 when he set the world 10km record of 26:24. He couldn’t place higher than ninth at the Tokyo Olympics over 10,000m but proved to be in top form in September when he recorded 26:43 at a 10km road race in Herzogenaurach.

While a men’s world record assault is not planned on this occasion, the pacemakers are set to go through the opening 10km in 27:30 on the hunt for a sub-58:00 finish time. In addition to Kipruto, Sunday’s field includes another four Kenyan athletes with PBs under 59 minutes: Philemon Kiplimo, who was fifth last year in Valencia in a career best of 58:11, plus Kelvin Kiptum (58:42), Abel Kipchumba (58:48) and Felix Kipkoech (58:57). Yet Kipruto’s toughest opposition might come from the two-time world 5000m champion Muktar Edris.

The 27-year-old Ethiopian posted a promising debut over the distance last November by clocking 59:04 in New Delhi and should play a key role on Sunday, while the European challenge will be headed by Norway’s Sondre Moen and Spain’s Carlos Mayo.

Weather forecasters predict an ideal morning for running, with a 13ºC temperature and a very slight breeze. After the four records set in Valencia last year – the men’s 10km, half marathon and 10,000m, plus the women’s 5000m – the city could witness another world best on Sunday.

Sifan Hassan crowned the 2021 European Athlete of the Year

Double Tokyo Olympics Games champion Sifan Hassan from the Netherlands has been crowned the 2021  European Woman Athlete of the Year at the Golden Tracks award ceremony that was held on Saturday (16) evening in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Hassan has been an outstanding performer this summer having won three medals that included the 5000m, 10,000m and 1500m bronze titles.

Hassan was crowned women’s European Athlete of the Year for the first time and she becomes just the second Dutch athlete to win this accolade after Dafne Schippers in 2014 and 2015.

Hassan – who was unfortunately not able to be present at the awards ceremony and Dutch federation President Eric van der Burg received her trophy on her behalf from European Athletics Vice President Cherry Alexander – won ahead of fellow Olympic champions Anita Wlodarczyk from Poland and Mariya Lasitskene, the latter being the 2019 European Athlete of the Year.

Hassan has also been in record-breaking form this season. She decimated Almaz Ayana’s world 10,000m record of 29:17.45 on home soil at the FBK Games in Hengelo in June with 29:06.82.

That mark was subsequently broken two days later on the same track by Letesenbet Gidey but Hassan outsprinted the Ethiopian for the Olympic 10,000m title, her sixth race in the Japanese capital after winning gold in the 5000m and then bronze in the 1500m.

It was a successful evening for Dutch athletics as European 400m hurdles record-holder Femke Bol was crowned women’s Rising Star.

Summary of Golden Tracks award winners 

  • Women’s European Athlete of the Year – Sifan Hassan (NED)
  • Men’s European Athlete of the Year – Karsten Warholm (NOR)
  • Women’s Rising Star – Femke Bol (NED)
  • Men’s Rising Star – Sasha Zhoya (FRA)
  • European Athletics Community Award – Maria Andrejczyk (POL)
  • European Athletics Women’s Leadership Award – Ana Krstevska (MKD)
  • Member Federation Award – Georgina Drumm (IRL)
  • European Athletics Coaching Award – Hansruedi Kunz (SUI)

 

Men’s and women’s European Athlete of the Year finalists announced

With 10 days until the Golden Tracks award ceremony takes place in Lausanne, Switzerland on 16 October, we can announce the three finalists for the men’s and women’s European Athlete of the Year.

The shortlist includes both the 2019 European Athletes of the Year Mariya Lasitskene and Karsten Warholm, both of whom won gold medals at the Tokyo Olympic Games and trophies in the Diamond League final in Zurich.

The shortlist was determined by a four-part voting process which incorporates votes from fans across social media, Member Federations, media and an expert European Athletics panel. Each section constituted 25 percent of the vote.

Sifan Hassan (The Netherlands)

Sifan Hassan almost pulled off the unthinkable feat of winning three individual gold medals at the same Olympics. Hassan won the 5000m and 10,000m titles but the Dutchwoman came up narrowly short in the 1500m, settling for bronze behind Faith Kipyegon and Laura Muir.

Hassan’s pre-Olympic campaign was highlighted by a world 10,000m record of 29:06.82 in Hengelo – a mark which was beaten on the same track only two days later by Letesenbet Gidey – and while her exploits in Tokyo had understandably caught up her, the seemingly indefitagle Hassan still finished her season with a flourish.

After winning over 5000m in Eugene, Hassan ran one of the fastest mile times in history in Brussels with 4:14.74 before finishing a close second to Kipyegon over 1500m in the Diamond League final in Zurich.

Mariya Lasitskene (Authorised Neutral Athlete / Russia)

Mariya Lasitskene has won multiple world and European titles both indoors and outdoors but an Olympic medal was conspicuously absent from her collection.

Still a junior at the time of the 2012 Olympics, Lasitskene missed out on selection for London and the blanket ban on Russian athletes meant Lasitskene was absent from the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

Troubled by a knee injury all season, Lasitskene only qualified for the final by virtue of a third-time clearance at 1.95m but the Russian showed her immense competitive mettle by clearing season’s best of 2.02m and then 2.04m to seal the title.

Lasitskene, who was the 2019 European Athlete of the Year, then went on to clear 2.05m in the Diamond League final in Zurich. Will she become just the second athlete after Dafne Schippers (2014-15) to win the award in back-to-back editions?

Anita Wlodarczyk (Poland)

Like Lasitskene, Anita Wlodarczyk was on the comeback trail from injury but the seasoned campaigner had timed her peak to perfection.

The world record-holder created history at the Olympic Games in Tokyo by becoming the first female athlete to win three successive gold medals in the same event, clinching a third gold medal in the hammer with a winning mark of 78.48m – her best mark in three years.

Armand Duplantis (Sweden)

His world record of 6.18m remains just beyond his reach for now but Armand Duplantis achieved a record for consistency at the highest level, clearing six metres or higher in no fewer than 12 competitions indoors and outdoors.

His indoor season was highlighted by a 6.10m clearance in Belgrade, a precursor to another title at the European Indoor Championships in Torun where he cleared 6.05m to take ownership of the championship record in the arena in which he broke the world record for the first time in 2020.

Duplantis suffered two unexpected losses outdoors but the American-based Swede won every significant competition including gold at the Olympic Games with 6.02m and the Diamond League final in Zurich with 6.06m.

Duplantis has previously been a winner at the Golden Tracks. He was named joint men’s Rising Star in 2018 alongside Norway’s Jakob Ingebrigtsen following their incredible exploits at the European Athletics Championships in Berlin.

Lamont Marcell Jacobs (Italy)

The men’s sprinting scene was thrust wide open this season and the vastly improving Lamont Marcell Jacobs duly filled this void with two scintillating performances in the 100m at the Tokyo Olympics.

Having broken the 10 second-barrier ahead of Tokyo, Jacobs eclipsed the European record with a 9.83 clocking in the semifinal before storming to gold in the final in 9.80. Further success came at the end of the championships as Jacobs ran the second leg of Italy’s gold medal-winning team in the 4x100m.

Jacobs gave notice of what was to come this summer by dominating the 60m at the European Athletics Indoor Championships in Torun where he won gold in a world lead of 6.47. He also caught the attention of eagle-eyed track fans with a scintillating 8.91 split at the World Relays in Silesia.

Karsten Warholm (Norway)

Karsten Warholm raced lightly in 2021 but his performances were of a stratospheric standard.

Warholm clinched the world record from Kevin Young, appropriately on home soil at the Bislett Games in Oslo with 46.70 but the Norwegian tore his record asunder at the Olympic Games in Tokyo where he broke through the 46 second-barrier with 45.94 – a respectable time even for the 400m flat!

For the third successive season, Warholm enjoyed an unbeaten campaign in the 400m hurdles. He also took notable wins in Monaco and Berlin as well as in Zurich at the Diamond League final.

At 25, Warholm is one of the few athletes to have won both the Rising Star award and the men’s European Athlete of the Year award. Will he win again in Lausanne?

Source: european-athletics.com

Gidey and Dibaba set to attack the world half record in Valencia

Fresh from winning 10,000m bronze medallist at the Concluded Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, Letesenbet Gidey will be facing off with world 1500m record holder Genzebe Dibaba at the Valencia Half Marathon that will be held on October 24 in Valencia, Spain.

 It will be an all Ethiopian battle, who both enjoys good time on the course. The 5,000m record holder with 14:06.62, also holds the 10,000m record set in Hengelo in 29:01.03 as well as the 15km world record in 44:20.

Dibaba on the other hand, the former Olympic Games 1500m Rio silver medallist, won Valencia title last year 1:05.18 while Senbere Teferi took the honors in 2019 with a time of 1:05.32.

Teferi also holds the 5Km record for women with 14:29. Another Ethiopia Yalemzerf Yehualaw comes with a personal best of 1:04.40 that she got when she finished third in the last World Half Marathon in Gdynia, Poland. She took 19 seconds off the world half marathon record, running a remarkable 1:03.44 at the P&O Ferries Antrim Coast Half Marathon.

Sifan Hassan threatens the world record in Brussels

Triple Olympic medallist, Sifan Hassan threatened the world record again in the One Mile race that was held on Friday Night at the Allianz Memorial Van Damme in the King Baudouin Stadium in Brussels, Belgium.

The 28-year-old who had finally admitted that her body could no longer handle a 10,000m race at the moment, could not trouble her own world record of 4:12.33 set in Monaco in July 2019.

The Dutch National had two pacemakers and Wavelight technology to assist her in breaking the record but it seemed it wasn’t her good day in office but she went on to write more history to her name as she ran the fifth fastest time in history and smashing the Meet Record with a world leading time of 4:14.74.

This is the second race that Hassan has set the meet record this year.

Hassan said afterwards, “I’m really happy with the time. After Tokyo I was so tired so I just wanted to run the short distance. My goal was to run fast here tonight and that is what I did.

“I was not thinking about the world record although I knew I was on world record pace in the beginning. But in the middle, it slowed down a bit. It does not matter.

“I am not running any long distances anymore this year. In Zurich I will run the 1500m.”

Ethiopia’s Axumawit Embaye was a distant runner-up in 4:21.08 with Australia’s Linden Hall third in an Oceanian record of 4:21.38. Spain’s Olympic finalist Maria Perez was fourth, also in a lifetime best of 4:21.58.

Hassan has had a brilliant year when she smashed Almaz Ayana’s world record from Rio 2016 by over 10 seconds in Hengelo in June, but Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey went five seconds quicker on the same track in just two days later.

 

Sifan Hassan targets One Mile Record in Brussels

Triple Olympic medallist, Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands had an incredible six races in eight days which yielded to two golds and a bronze in Tokyo; you would be forgiven for thinking she might need a break.

Hassan has had a brilliant year when she smashed Almaz Ayana’s world record from Rio 2016 by over 10 seconds in Hengelo in June, but Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey went five seconds quicker on the same track in just two days later.

The 28-year-old has finally admitted that her body can no longer handle a 10,000m race at the moment forcing her to focus on the One Mile race that will be held on Friday Night at the King Baudouin Stadium in Brussels, Belgium.

The Dutch will be in familiar grounds as she broke the one-hour world record there 12 months ago and she is determined to break her own mile world record of 4:12.33 that she set set in Monaco in July 2019

WHO IS Yalemzerf Yehualaw?

Yalemzerf Yehualaw may only have been running internationally for the past couple of years but her journey in the sport began when she was at school.

Growing up in West Gojjam, in a village in the Amhara region of Ethiopia north of Addis Ababa, she was the eldest of six siblings and showed her talent for athletics with wins on the track, road and cross country.

Winning 3000m and 5000m youth titles, the NN Running Team has explained, saw her talent recognised and she formed part of the Ethiopian Athletics Federation Academy system in Addis Ababa.

Then in 2017 she joined coach Tessema Abshero. “Many Ethiopian athletes have a natural gift,” Abshero told the NN Running Team, “but Yalemzerf had three very good qualities; speed, endurance and good core strength.”
Yehualaw worked towards her first overseas race, which was to be the 2019 Rabat Half Marathon. There she ran 1:09:13 to win by almost three minutes and then she returned to Ethiopia to compete over 10,000m on the track at the Ethiopian Championships, finishing fifth in 32:21.0 in a race won by Letesenbet Gidey, who would go on to break world records in the 5000m and 10,000m.

Later that year Yehualaw secured a place on the Ethiopian team for the African Games, which meant a return to Rabat and another win as, clocking 1:10:26, she broke the Games record. Her next race was the Delhi Half Marathon, where she improved her PB to 1:06:01 before a 10km win at the Great Ethiopian Run (31:55). She brought 2019 to a close with another win, clocking 1:07:34 at the Xiamen Half Marathon in China.

The year 2020 started with a sixth-place finish at the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon despite stomach problems and she continued her preparations for the World Athletics Half Marathon Championships in Gdynia, Poland. But the pandemic forced the global event’s postponement and Yehualaw went back to train in her home village. Groups gradually returned to training in Addis Ababa and Yehualaw’s focus remained on the World Half Marathon Championships, rescheduled for October.

Her coach believed she could win a medal there and he was right, as Yehualaw improved to a PB of 1:05:19 to get bronze, despite slipping in the closing stages, as race winner Peres Jepchirchir ran a women-only world record of 1:05.16.

Just six weeks later, Yehualaw was back in action at the Delhi Half Marathon and this time she claimed the win, again running a PB of 1:04.46 which at that time was the second-fastest ever women’s half marathon. She ended the year in style by winning the Nationale-Nederlanden San Silvestre Vallecana 10km in Madrid in 31:17.

Yehualaw picked up from where she left off in 2021, winning the 10,000m at the Olympic candidate trial competition before a return to the roads. In Istanbul in April she went quicker still in the half marathon, improving to 1:04:40 for a time which then placed her third on the world all-time list.
Her Olympic hopes were dashed when she placed fourth in the Ethiopian Trials 10,000m and did not make the team for the Games in Tokyo but she instead put her energy into her next road race – the Antrim Coast Half Marathon.
After a spell spent training in Seefeld in Austria, Yehualaw made the trip to Northern Ireland with her eye on Chepngetich’s world record mark. She remained on pace throughout the race and her dream was realized when she crossed the finish line with a time of 1:03.44 on the clock. No other woman has ever run under 64 minutes for the distance.

“I have tried twice before to break the world record but it didn’t happen,” she said on the live BBC stream. “I’m so happy it happened today in Larne.”

STATS

World half marathon record progression (mixed)

1:06:44 Elana Meyer (RSA) Tokyo 1999
1:06:25 Lornah Kiplagat (NED) Udine 2007
1:05:50 Mary Keitany (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2011
1:05:12 Florence Kiplagat (KEN) Barcelona 2014
1:05:09 Florence Kiplagat (KEN) Barcelona 2015
1:05:06 Peres Jepchirchir (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2017
1:04:52 Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) Prague 2017
1:04:51 Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) Valencia 2017
1:04:31 Ababel Yeshaneh (ETH) Ras Al Khaimah 2020
1:04:02 Ruth Chepngetich (KEN) Istanbul 2021**
1:03:44 Yalemzerf Yehualaw (ETH) Larne 2021**

World half marathon all-time list

1:03:44 Yalemzerf Yehualaw (ETH) Larne 2021
1:04:02 Ruth Chepngetich (KEN) Istanbul 2021
1:04:31 Ababel Yeshaneh (ETH) Ras Al Khaimah 2020
1:04:49 Brigid Kosgei (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2020
1:04:51 Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) Valencia 2017
1:04:51 Hellen Obiri (KEN) Istanbul 2021
1:04:52 Fancy Chemutai (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2018
1:04:55 Mary Keitany (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2018
1:05:04 Joan Melly (KEN) Prague 2018
1:05:06 Peres Jepchirchir (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2017

Yalemzerf Yehualaw’s progression

(half marathon)
2019: 1:06:01
2020: 1:04:46
2021: 1:03:44

Source: keirradnedge.com/