Tag Archives: Lelisa Desisa

2022 Boston Marathon is the deepest field in history

This Boston Marathon may not have legends Eliud Kipchoge or Kenenisa Bekele, but it does have most of the other stars of recent years. It is arguably the deepest Boston men’s field in the race’s 126-year history.

Like with the women’s race, Boston got a boost with a return to its Patriots’ Day date for the first time since 2019. The world’s other jewel spring marathon, London, which usually has the best roster of the spring, is once again being held in the fall this year due to the pandemic.

So this field includes every man who won Boston, London and New York City in 2019 and 2021 (save Kipchoge), the last two world champions, plus recent winners of Chicago and Tokyo.

Picking a favorite is difficult, but the entries can be separated between recent breakthroughs and veteran champions.

Three men in the field earned their first major marathon victories last fall: Kenyans Benson Kipruto (Boston) and Albert Korir (New York City) and Ethiopian Sisay Lemma (London).

The names with more pizzazz: Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor, a longtime training partner of Kipchoge, won New York City in 2017 and 2019, plus three world half marathon titles. But he was fourth in his lone marathon since the start of the pandemic, missing time after fracturing a tibia when hit by a motorcycle while training in June 2020.

Kenyan Lawrence Cherono is the only man other than Kipchoge to win two annual major marathons in one year since the start of 2015. He claimed Boston and Chicago in 2019 and hasn’t had a bad marathon in four years.

Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa is still just 32 years old, which is remarkable given his resume: Boston champion in 2013 and 2015, New York City champion in 2018 and world champion in 2019. He has a DNF and a 35th in two marathons over the last two and a half years, though.

Another Ethiopian, Birhanu Legese, is the third-fastest man in history and thus the fastest man in this field with a personal best of 2:02:48 from 2019. He won Tokyo in 2019 and 2020 and hasn’t finished worse than fifth in a marathon in the last three and a half years.

Ethiopians Lemi Berhanu (won Boston in 2016, second in 2021) and Evans Chebet (seventh-fastest man in history at 2:03:00) also deserves mention.

The fastest Americans in the field are Scott Fauble (2:09:09) and Colin Bennie (2:09:38), plus Olympians Jake Riley and Jared Ward.

Source:  olympics.nbcsports.com

World’s Fastest ever men’s field assembled for Boston Marathon

The organisers of the 126th edition of the Boston Marathon, which is the World Athletics Platinum Elite Label Road Race, have released their fastest ever elite list for men that will be held on Monday April 18, 2022 in Boston.

Three time Olympic champion Kenenisa Bekele from Ethiopia leads the elite list of 12 men who have gone under the 2:06 mark. Bekele is the second fastest marathon runner in history with a personal best of 2:01.41.

“I recognise the tradition of the Boston Marathon and look forward to racing in April,” said Bekele. “For many years Ethiopia has had a strong tradition in Boston, and I am excited to join that legacy. I have long looked forward to racing the Boston Marathon.”

Seven of the past eight winners will also return to Boston, including 2021 champion Benson Kipruto of Kenya. Lawrence Cherono (2019), Yuki Kawauchi (2018), Geoffrey Kirui (2017), Lemi Berhanu (2016), and two times winner Lelisa Desisa (2015 and 2013) are the other six former winners.

The 2021 fastest man in marathon, Titus Ekiru, who holds a personal best of 2:02.57 that he got in Milan, will be battling for the top honors too. “I am happy to announce that I’ll be lining the street of Boston Marathon for my first time next April in the Boston Marathon]. Can’t wait for it!”

The 2020 world leader Evans Chebet, New York City Marathon winner Albert Korir, and three-time world half marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor.

LEADING RESULTS

42KM MEN

  1. Kenenisa Bekele      (ETH) 2:01.41
  2. Titus Ekiru               (KEN) 2:02.57
  3. Evans Chebet           (KEN) 2:03.00
  4. Lawrence Cherono  (KEN) 2:03.04
  5. Bernard Koech         (KEN) 2:04.09
  6. Lemi Berhanu          (ETH) 2:04.33
  7. Lelisa Desisa            (ETH) 2:04.45
  8. Gabriel Geay             (TAN) 2:04.55
  9. Benson Kipruto        (KEN) 2:05.13
  10. Geoffrey Kamworor (KEN) 2:05.23
  11. Eric Kiptanui             (KEN) 2:05.47
  12. Bethwell Yegon         (KEN) 2:06.14
  13. Geoffrey Kirui            (KEN) 2:06.27
  14. Eyob Faniel                 (ITA) 2:07.19
  15. Yuki Kawauchi           (JPN) 2:07.27
  16. Albert Korir                (KEN) 2:08.03
  17. Amanuel Mesel          (ERI) 2:08.17
  18. Bayelign Teshager     (ETH) 2:08.28
  19. Tsegay Weldibanos    (ERI) 2:09.07
  20. Scott Fauble                (USA) 2:09.09
  21. Colin Bennie               (USA) 2:09.38
  22. Trevor Hofbauer         (CAN) 2:09.51
  23. Jared Ward                   (USA) 2:09.25
  24. Ian Butler                     (USA) 2:09.45
  25. Mick Iacofano             (USA) 2:09.55
  26. Jake Riley                     (USA) 2:10.02
  27. Jerrell Mock                 (USA) 2:10.37
  28. Jemal Yimer                (ETH) 2:10.38
  29. Juan Luis Barrios       (MEX) 2:10.55
  30. Matt McDonald          (USA) 2:11.10
  31. Matt Llano                   (USA) 2:11.14
  32. Elkanah Kibet              (USA) 2:11.15
  33. CJ Albertson                (USA) 2:11.18
  34. Diego Estrada              (USA) 2:11.54

Lelisa Desisa targets a hat trick at Boston Marathon

Two-time Boston Marathon champion, reigning World Athletics Marathon champion, Lelisa Desisa will be the star to watch at the 125th edition of the Boston Marathon that will be held on Monday (11) Eastern Massachusetts, Boston.

Desisa, who cut the tape in 2013 in a time of 2:10.22 then again in 2015 in 2:09.17, returns to Boston for the seventh time. In 2019, Desisa finished runner-up by a mere two seconds behind winner Lawrence Cherono.

“Boston has become my second home and I truly cherish my time when I am there,” said Desisa. “I return to compete still chasing my third victory in the Boston Marathon. Thank you, Boston; I look forward to putting on a good show for you on Marathon Monday!”

The 31 year-old has previously won the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon, 2013 Dubai Marathon, and earned silver at the 2013 World Athletics Championships Marathon. He comes to this race with a personal best of 2:04.45 that he got in 2013 at Dubai Marathon which is the third fastest time on paper. The Boston marathon has invited nine men who have sub 2:06.00 or faster.

Daniel Kipchumba wins the Copenhagen Half Marathon

Kenya’s Daniel Kipchumba took the top honors at the 4th edition of the Copenhagen Half Marathon that was held on Sunday in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The hopes for a world record was high before the race, however, they do not come easy. The first 10km proved to be too slow with a large leading group splitting in 28:10, with the 21 year-old battling for the top honors with Abraham Kiptum the 2018 Daegu course record holder, Ethiopia’s Jemal Yimer Mekonnen and double world champion on 3000m indoor, Ethiopian Yomif Kejelcha for the top honors.

Kipchumba managed to hold the pace and broke away from the crowd at the 15km mark and he never looked back to cut the tape in 59:06 which is the second fastest time.

“I am very happy. I wanted to push the pace at 15K, but I found conditions to be too windy, and so I stayed in the group,” said the 21-year-old Kenyan, who fought a close battle with his countryman Abraham Kiptum, eventually beating him with three seconds.

Kiptum crossed the line in second place in 59:09 with Mekonnen closing the podium three finishes in 59:14.

Kejecha came home in fourth with Felix Kibitok from Kenya finishing in fifth place in 59:17 and 59:21.

Rio Olympics marathon silver meadallist Lelisa Desisa finished a distant seventh in 59:52.

Kipchumba told afterwards that he will be attempting a new fast half marathon time in New Delhi on October 21st.

Eight men dipped under the magic 60 minutes, once again proving the race to be one of fastest half marathon races in the world.

LEADING RESULTS
MEN

  1. Daniel Kipchumba (KEN) 59:06
  2. Abraham Kiptum    (KEN) 59:09
  3. Jemal Mekonnen     (ETH) 59:14
  4. Yomif Kejelcha        (ETH) 59:17
  5. Felix Kibitok            (KEN) 59:21

Bernard Lagat to debut at New York City Marathon

Bernard Lagat, a five-time Olympian who in Rio became the oldest U.S. Olympic runner in history, will make his marathon debut in New York on Nov. 4.

“A few years ago, I was able to watch the  from one of the lead vehicles, and I knew that when I ran a marathon someday, I wanted it to be in New York,” the 43-year-old Lagat said, according to a press release.

Lagat retired from track racing after placing fifth in the Rio Olympic 5000m, where he was briefly a bronze medalist before two disqualifications were overturned. Lagat previously earned Olympic 1500m silver and bronze competing for Kenya in 2000 and 2004.

If Lagat continues racing marathons through 2020, he could try to tie Angolan João N’Tyamba‘s record for Olympic participation’s by a male runner at six and become the fourth-oldest Olympic male runner.

“My mind isn’t going that far yet,” Lagat said, according to SI.com. “I’m just going to take this one at a time. My training partners have asked me, ‘If you are successful in New York, will you run the marathon for 2020?’ and I say, ‘I don’t know.’

“I want to get ready for New York City first, and whatever happens there will determine 2020.”

Lagat finished 31st in the world half marathon championships on March 24.

Lagat joins a New York field that includes defending champion Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya, two-time Boston Marathon winner Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia and four-time U.S. Olympian Abdi Abdirahman.

Kirui and Rupp renew Boston Marathon duel

U.S. Olympic bronze medallist Galen Rupp lost to Kirui by 21 seconds in the 2017 race and is back while New York City Marathon champion – and home state favourite – Shalane Flanagan headlines a group of four top U.S. women’s contenders.

Rain and temperatures in the 50s (13 C) after an icy weekend are forecast, making for a messy race day.

That could be a factor, especially for the African athletes.

No American man has won in Boston since 1983, and Kirui, former champions Lelisa Desisa and Lemi Berhanu of Ethiopia, Ethiopian Tamirat Tola, the fastest in the field at 2:04.06, and Kenyan dark horse Nobert Kigen are aiming to keep it that way.

Yet many believe Chicago Marathon winner Rupp will have a say.

“Galen will definitely be much harder to beat than last year, regardless of how the race plays out,” Alberto Salazar, his coach and a former Boston champion, told reporters.

“But Kirui or the others may also be in better shape than last year, so it’s impossible to predict.”

The final few miles proved costly in 2017 to Rupp, who admitted afterwards: “I just did not have it over those last three or four miles.”

Kirui, 25, backed up his Boston win, his first victory in a marathon, by taking the 2017 world championship title. He carries a personal best of 2:06:27 to Rupp’s 2:09:20.

The U.S. women’s drought at Boston stretches back to 1985.

Flanagan, Jordan Hasay, Molly Huddle and Desi Linden will try to change that against an international field that may not be as strong as in past years.

Flanagan, 36, who grew up in Massachusetts, is the sentimental favourite, with Hasay holding the best Boston finish.

The 26-year-old made it to the podium in 2017, finishing third at both Boston and Chicago. The Boston race was her marathon debut.

Linden and Huddle are both experienced marathoners with Linden fourth in Boston in 2017 and Huddle third in the 2016 New York City Marathon.

Kiplagat, the Kenyan mother of five who is now 38, returns to defend her title after finishing second in the world championships and fourth in New York City in 2017.

Aselefech Mergia, a former London winner, and fellow Ethiopian Mamitu Daska, who was third in New York last year, could be Kiplagat’s biggest international challengers along with former Boston winners Buzunesh Deba (Ethiopia) and Caroline Rotich (Kenya).