Tag Archives: Lamont Marcell Jacobs

Tokyo Olympics 100m champion won’t run again until 2022

Olympic 100m champion Lamont Marcell Jacobs has said he will not compete again until next year.

In response to a question on social media about when he would next race, the 26-year-old responded with “2022”.

Jacobs followed up his shock 100m victory in Tokyo with another gold as part of Italy’s 4x100m relay team.

His manager Marcello Magnani said injury was not a factor in the decision to take a break, but the time off is a preventative measure.

“It is simply that Marcell has given so much this year, all he had, so to insist [on competing] would only mean risking an injury,” Magnani added.

European indoor 60m champion Jacobs, who only switched away from long jump in 2018, produced one of the biggest surprises in Tokyo when he won 100m gold in in 9.80 seconds.

It was only in May that he broke the 10-second barrier for the first time.

He was next scheduled to run on August 21 at the Eugene Diamond League meet in the United States.

After that, Jacobs was to appear on 3 September in Brussels and then anticipated to compete on 9 September in Zurich for the season-ending Diamond League Finals.

Double Olympic champion Jacobs shrugs off doping suspicions

Italy’s double Olympic champion Lamont Marcell Jacobs has insisted he is not bothered by suspicions of doping raised by the media, and that hard work is to thank for his record-breaking exploits in Tokyo.

Jacobs became the first Italian to win 100 metres gold, setting a European record time of 9.80 seconds in the final, and was part of his country’s triumphant 4×100 metres relay team.

The 26-year-old’s performances led to media reports highlighting doping cases involving breakout stars in athletics, stories Giovanni Malago, the president of the Italian Olympic Committee, described as “unpleasant”.

“These controversies do not affect me,” Jacobs told Il Messaggero on Monday.

“I know that I got here by making many sacrifices. I have been through disappointments and defeats, but I always got back up and rolled my sleeves up.

“If I have reached this point, it is only thanks to hard work. They can write what they want.”

Jacobs said on Saturday he had split from his former nutritionist once he heard that Giacomo Spazzini was allegedly being investigated for a connection with performance-enhancing substances.

“This is something that honestly, I am not involved with, because from the very first moment we heard about this thing that happened, we stopped working with him,” Jacobs said.

“But we are not worried; in fact the person was involved in a situation which was not his fault. At the end of the situation he was not considered guilty, so we are relaxed about it.”

Climate change could lead to switch of event dates, suggests Coe

Rising summer temperatures worldwide could lead to a major rethink about when major sporting events are held, Sebastian Coe, President of World Athletics said on Sunday after another brutal day for athletes in the men’s marathon.

The marathons and walk events were shifted from Tokyo to the supposedly-cooler northern city of Sapporo but there was little relief, with temperatures in the high 30s Celsius, even with early-morning starts.

Heat and humidity was an issue in Tokyo, where the endurance athletes in particular – even those well-used to training in hot climes – found it extremely tough.

“They were difficult conditions and we could well be confronting the same temperatures in Paris in 2024,” Coe said.

“At the U.S. trials in Eugene (host city of next year’s world championships) it was in excess of 40 (104 Fahrenheit). This is the challenge we are all going to confront now, and it will probably need a global discourse around the calendar and how we stage events.

“I’m no climatologist but the reality is that wherever we go the new norm will be dealing with really harsh climatic conditions.”

The 1964 Tokyo Games were held in October, as were the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Seoul in 1988 and Sydney 2000 were both in September, but the norm for northern hemisphere cities has been for July or August.

Next year’s soccer World Cup in Qatar has been shifted from its normal summer slot and will be held in November/December to avoid the worst of the heat.

Coe did mention that for the sprinters the conditions were ideal for warm ups and performance.

One of them, Italy’s Lamont Marcell Jacobs was one of the stories of the Games after his shock 100m win and his role in Italy’s 4x100m relay victory.

After coming into the year with a personal best of over 10 seconds Jacobs took gold last week in a European record of 9.80, leading to immediate speculation that his starling improvement was a result of chemical help.

Jacobs said on Saturday he had split from his former nutritionist once he heard that Giacomo Spazzini was allegedly being investigated for a connection with performance-enhancing substances.

“If you make breakthroughs people ask questions,” Coe said. I’m sure they did about my career. I came back from the European championships in 1978 with a bronze medal and a year later I had three world records.”

Coe said that any doping questions are now addressed by the independent Athletics Integrity Unit.

“I’m satisfied that we have the best unit of its kind in any sport,” he said. “But we have to be permanently vigilant.”

Coe said he was leaving “with a massive well of thanks and appreciation and a promise to the people of Japan that we owe you a massive debt of gratitude for the gracious way you’ve hosted us in the face of the hardship you have endured.

“Hosting an Olympic Games in normal circumstances is excruciatingly difficult, I know, I’ve done it,” said Coe, who ran London 2012.

“But hosting Games in these mountainously difficult conditions has been nothing short of a miracle.”

Italy Olympics chief blasts Jacobs doping suspicions

Doping suspicions aimed at Italy’s 100 metres Olympic champion Lamont Marcell Jacobs are embarrassing and unpleasant, the Italian Olympic Committee (CONI) president Giovanni Malago said on Tuesday.

Jacobs claimed a stunning gold on Sunday, setting a European record time of 9.80 seconds in the showcase final in Tokyo despite having not gone under 10 seconds until this year.

However, the 26-year-old’s unexpected victory resulted in the Washington Post writing that “the history of track and field casts suspicion on sudden and immense improvement”, a reference to previous doping cases.

“Jacobs deserves the benefit of the doubt, but his sport does not,” the article added.

The Times wrote that athletics’ dark history with doping “means the arrival of any new star will alert the more sceptical”.

But Malago blasted any suggestion of wrongdoing.

“The remarks of some of your colleagues are a source of great regret and embarrassment from every point of view,” Malago told Rai Radio 1.

“We are talking about athletes, in this case, who are subjected to systematic and daily anti-doping checks.

“When you set a national or even continental record that number doubles, so much so that he said the number of checks was impressive.

“It is truly something unpleasant, it shows how some are not able to accept defeat.”

Jacobs was one of several high-profile athletes to wear new running spikes featuring “performance-enhancing” carbon soles as he won gold.

Athletes in Tokyo have also praised a fast track that has produced a host of world, continental and national records from sprint to middle distances.