Tag Archives: Kendra Harrison

Michael Saruni the star to watch at Millrose Games

Kenya’s Michael Saruni will be the star to watch at the Millrose Games, the World Athletics Indoor Tour Gold meeting that will be held on January 29, 2020 in New York City.

Saruni is the African indoor record holder with a time of 1:43.98 that places him as the fastest indoor 800m ever achieved in the US. This time also made him the second-fastest indoor performer at that time.

“It will be really great to come back to The Armory and the Millrose Games where I had such a great winning race,” Saruni said.

The 26 years-old will face off with the seventh fastest world indoor all-time list for 800m, Bryce Hoppel who holds a personal best of 1:44.37.  The 24 year-old finished fourth at the 2019 World Championships.

Five other Olympians will take part in this race, including NCAA champion, Isaiah Jewett, Charlie Hunter of Australia, Mexican record-holder Jesus Lopez of Mexico, Spanish record-holder Saul Ordonez and Irish record-holder Mark English. Isaiah Harris, who represented the USA at the 2017 World Championships.

Other top notch athletes to race at the Millrose Games include Olympic shot put champion Ryan Crouser, Donavan Brazier, world 800m champion, world shot put champion Joe Kovacs, Olympic 800m champion Athing Mu, Olympic pole vault champion Katie Nageotte, world indoor pole vault champion Sandi Morris, world 100m hurdles record-holder Kendra Harrison, 2016 world indoor 60m champion Trayvon Bromell, Olympic 200m bronze medallist Gabby Thomas, and Olympic 1500m bronze medallist Josh Kerr.

Every World Record in the Wanda Diamond League

When Karsten Warholm clocked 46.70 at his home meet in Oslo last July, it was the end of his long quest to break an almost three-decades old world record and cement his status as the fastest 400m hurdler in athletics history.

The astonishing performance also made him the seventh athlete ever to break a world record in a major discipline on the Wanda Diamond League circuit. As we look forward to another season of world-class performances in 2022, here’s a look back at every single Wanda Diamond League world record to date.

Watch all the world records on the Wanda Diamond League YouTube page.

 Aries Merritt – Brussels 2012

US hurdler Aries Merritt became the first world-record breaker in the Diamond League when he stormed to a historic 12.80 in the men’s 110m hurdles in Brussels. The performance also secured him his first and only Diamond Trophy.

 Genzebe Dibaba – Monaco 2015

Genzebe Dibaba was crowned 1500m world champion in Beijing in 2015, but she had already made it to the top of the world a few weeks earlier with a breathtaking 3:50.07 at the Stade Louis II. The dominant victory made her the series’ second world-record breaker, and the first of many at the Monaco Diamond League.

 Kendra Harrison – London 2016

Having suffered heartbreak at the US Olympic trials earlier that year, Kendra Harrison was a woman on a mission in the 2016 Diamond League as she stormed to victory after victory in the 100m hurdles. She crowned an impressive, title-winning season with a world record of 12.20 in London, a performance which left even her gaping in disbelief at the clock.

 Beatrice Chepkoech – Monaco 2018

Kenyan long-distance specialist Beatrice Chepkoech was in brilliant form in 2018, and she made it count in Monaco, clocking a 3000m steeplechase world record of 8:44.32, becoming the fifth athlete to break a world record at Herculis and the second after Dibaba to do so in the Diamond League era.

 Sifan Hassan – Monaco 2019

Dutch star Sifan Hassan had a twinkle in her eye when she was asked about a potential world record ahead of the Monaco Diamond League in 2019, and that proved a prelude to her glittering performance on the track. Her 4:12.33 made her the fastest female miler in history, and gave her another boost on her way to a Diamond League double in that season.

 Joshua Cheptegei – Monaco 2020

In a season truncated by the coronavirus pandemic, there was the only men’s 5000m race in 2020, but what a race it was. Monaco completed a hat-trick of world-record breaking years, as Ugandan long-distance star Joshua Cheptegei clocked to 12:35.36 to break the 5000m best for the first time since 2004.

 Karsten Warholm – Oslo 2021

Warholm had been closing in on the 400m hurdles world record for several seasons when he finally broke it with 46.70 on his home track in Oslo last summer. He went one better at the Olympic final in Tokyo a few weeks later, becoming the first hurdler ever to break the 46-second barrier.

Note: Three world records were also broken in non-Diamond League disciplines at the Wanda Diamond League exhibition event in Brussels in September 2020: Bashir Abdi in the 20,000m, and Mo Farah and Sifan Hassan in the One Hour.

Source: diamondleague.com

London’s Top Three Moments – Obiri Upstages Muir’s record attempt

Later this week, the IAAF Diamond League heads to London for the 11th meeting in the 2018 series. Here we look back at three of the more memorable moments from the British capital.

HARRISON BREAKS 28-YEAR-OLD 100M HURDLES WORLD RECORD, 2016

Kendra Harrison’s world 100m hurdles record of 12.20, beating the 1988 mark of 12.21 set by Bulgaria’s Yordanka Donkova, put even Usain Bolt’s 19.89 200m into the shade on the first of two days of competition in London’s Olympic stadium.

Two months after becoming the second fastest women’s high hurdler in history with 12.24 at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Eugene, and two weeks after failing to qualify for the US Olympic team, the 24-year-old from Tennessee produced one of the great track performances in front of more than 40,000 fans.

“Only the record will make up for missing out on Rio,” Harrison had said at the previous day’s press conference.

Harrison, who had won her heat in 12.40, crossed the line five metres clear of a world-class field, but the time which flashed up was only 12.58. But shortly afterwards, the figures were corrected to a world record mark and the winner sank to her knees in tears.

Harrison had dipped so low at the line, she had run beneath the beam and the trackside clock initially recorded the uncorrected time of second-placed Brianna Rollins, later credited with 12.57.

“I wanted to come out here and show the world that I still have it, even though I won’t be going to the Olympics,” she said. “I had to give it all I had.

“Initially I saw 12.5 and I was just happy to come out here and win. I was so happy when it came up and I was feeling really blessed.”

OBIRI UPSTAGES MUIR’S RECORD ATTEMPT, 2017

There would hardly have been a more popular winner in the mile than Laura Muir, who had begun her year by winning European indoor titles at 1500m and 3000m.

The previous year Muir had beaten the British 1500m held by double Olympic gold medallist Kelly Holmes, running 3:55.22 at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Paris and concluding her season by winning the IAAF Diamond League final in Zurich.

Now she was after the imperial version of that record, set 32 years earlier by Zola Budd at 4:17.57.

Hellen Obiri had other plans.

She tailed the Briton through the bell. As Muir hit the home straight, the noise levels in the Olympic stadium rose to the heights. But then Kenya’s Olympic 5000m silver medallist moved past her to break her own national record, setting a meeting record of 4:16.56.

Only Genzebe Dibaba had run faster than that time this millennium. Obiri moved above Mary Slaney on the world all-time list having eclipsed Olympic 1500m champion Faith Kipyegon as the fastest Kenyan ever.

Muir, ultimately, paid for her early ambition, finishing six tenths off Budd’s mark in 4:18.03. But it had been a proper, old fashioned race that will be long remembered.

With the top five athletes finishing within 4:20 and best marks-for-place being set from fourth to 14th, it was the deepest women’s mile race in history.

SILVA HEADS FOR GOLD WITH IAAF DIAMOND LEAGUE RECORD, 2013

Cuba’s Yarisley Silva achieved her second consecutive IAAF Diamond League victory over Jenn Suhr and Fabiana Murer, beating the respective Olympic and world champions with an IAAF Diamond League record of 4.83m.

Suhr took second with 4.73m, although she had two goes at 4.88m, with Murer third at 4.63m, reversing their positions from the previous month’s IAAF Diamond League meeting in Birmingham.

Early in the season, Silva had altered her technique in line with her rising ambitions, holding the pole higher and extending her run-up. She was aiming for gold at the IAAF World Championships in Moscow. She went on to take bronze in the Russian capital, but a world indoor title in 2014 was a step towards her making the top of the podium at the IAAF World Championships Beijing 2015.

Rudisha headlines Shanghai Diamond League

Olympic 800m champion David Rudisha headlines a list of no fewer than 14 world and Olympic champions who are expected to grace the Shanghai Diamond League on May 12.

Rudisha, the world record holder over the distance will hope to make it third time lucky after finishing fifth on his Shanghai debut in 2016 and third last year.

Fellow Kenyan Timothy Cheruiyot will be hoping to start his Diamond League trophy defence on a the right foot when he parades in the 1500m race.

The stellar line-up includes eight gold medallists from the IAAF World Championships London 2017 and six athletes who struck gold at the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics, plus nine event winners from last year’s Diamond League and two newly crowned world indoor champions.

Kendra Harrison clinched her first global crown when she took the 60m hurdles title in Birmingham earlier this month, equalling the North American record of 7.70. The outdoor world record-holder will make her Shanghai debut in the 100m hurdles and will face Olympic champion Brianna McNeal (nee Rollins).

The Shanghai crowd will be treated to another tasty head-to-head in the women’s 200m in which two-time world champion Dafne Schippers takes on Olympic 400m champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo.

Schippers will be racing in Shanghai for the first time, while Miller-Uibo has fond memories of the city, having triumphed over 400m for the past two years. The Bahamian set an early world lead to take the Shanghai title in 2017 and went on to claim overall Diamond League trophies for both 200m and 400m, setting a national record of 21.88 in the half-lap final in Zurich when her Dutch rival was fourth.

In the men’s 100m China’s world indoor 60m silver medallist Su Bingtian will take on two world champions, Justin Gatlin and Ramil Guliyev. Su brought the crowd to its feet 12 months ago when he clinched his first ever IAAF Diamond League victory and the Chinese record-holder will be hoping for a repeat performance against the world 100m and 200m champions.

Botswana’s Diamond League champion Isaac Makwala will face world silver medallist Steven Gardiner in the 400m.

Omar McLeod will target a third successive Shanghai victory in the 110m hurdles when he takes on Spain’s Orlando Ortega. Jamaica’s world and Olympic champion broke the 13-second barrier when he triumphed here in 2016 before going on to claim the Olympic crown just ahead of Ortega.

Other reigning IAAF Diamond League champions who will be looking for early points include Dalilah Muhammad in the women’s 400m hurdles and Maria Lasitskene, the world indoor and outdoor high jump champion.

Colombia’s Olympic champion Caterine Ibarguen is targeting a winning return to Shanghai after she won the women’s triple jump here in 2013 and 2015, as will Luvo Manyonga, the South African who leapt to an IAAF Diamond League and African record of 8.61m to take maximum points in the long jump last May before going to win the world title and Diamond trophy in August. Manyonga will face China’s newly minted Asian indoor champion, Shi Yuhao.

Sam Kendricks, another of last year’s world and IAAF Diamond League champions, takes on the host nation’s World Championships fourth-place finisher, Xue Changrui, in the men’s pole vault. Like McLeod, Kendricks is seeking a Shanghai hat-trick after beating world record-holder Renaud Lavillenie with a vault of 5.88m 12 months ago.

Chinese stars will also feature heavily in the women’s throws, not least world and IAAF Diamond League champion Gong Lijiao, who hopes to repeat her season-boosting shot put victory from 12 months ago. Asian record-holder and world bronze medallist Lyu Huihui will also have high hopes in the javelin. More big names will be announced in the next few weeks.