Tag Archives: Joyciline Jepkosgei

Joyciline Jepkosgei to face Peres Jepchirchir at Boston Marathon

Tokyo Olympic Marathon champion, Peres Jepchirchir will lead a power-packed women’s elite fiend for the 26th edition of the Boston Marathon title that will be held on Monday April 18, 2022.

Jepchirchir, who won both the Olympic and New York City Marathons last year is the fastest women in the field that was announced by the race organisers.

“We are delighted to welcome the fastest and most accomplished women’s field in the history of the Boston Marathon,” said Boston Athletic Association president and CEO Tom Grilk through a statement. “Though there have been many milestones in the five decades since the women’s division was established in Boston, this field of Olympic and Paralympic medalists, Boston champions, and global stars will make this a race to remember on Patriots’ Day.”

The adidas-sponsored athlete has a personal best of 2:17.16 that she set in Valencia in 2020

There’s something uniquely special about the Boston Marathon, and I absolutely can’t wait to line up in Hopkinton this April for the race!” Jepchirchir will face off with the London Marathon winner Joyciline Jepkosgei who holds a personal best of 2:17.43.

Seven women have broken the 2:20 barrier with a dozen running under 2:23 mark, including reigning, the 2021 London runner-up Degitu Azimeraw of Ethiopia who holds a personal best of 2:17.58 and 2021 Olympic fourth-placed Roza Dereje of Ethiopia of pb 2:18.30.

In addition to Molly Seidel, the Tokyo Olympics bronze medallist will lead other top Americans like Sara Hall of 2:20.32, Des Linden (2:22.38), and Kellyn Taylor (2:24.28).

LEADING TIME

42KM WOMEN

  1. Peres Jepchirchir,           KEN, 2:17.16   (Valencia, 2020)
  2. Joyciline Jepkosgei,        KEN, 2:17.43   (London, 2021)
  3. Degitu Azimeraw,           ETH, 2:17.58   (London, 2021)
  4. Roza Dereje,                     ETH, 2:18.30   (Valencia, 2019)
  5. Zeineba Yimer,                ETH, 2:19.28   (Valencia, 2019)
  6. Edna Kiplagat                  KEN, 2:19.50   (London, 2012)
  7. Tigist Girma,                    ETH, 2:19.52   (Amsterdam, 2019)
  8. Maurine Chepkemoi,      KEN, 2:20.18   (Amsterdam, 2021)
  9. Sara Hall,                          USA, 2:20.32  (Chandler, 2020)
  10. Desiree Linden,               USA, 2:22.38 (Boston, 2011)
  11. Viola Cheptoo,                KEN, 2:22.44  (New York City, 2021)
  12. Purity Changwony,         KEN, 2:22.46   (Ampugnano, 2021)
  13. Charlotte Purdue,           GBR, 2:23.26   (London, 2021)
  14. Kellyn Taylor,                   USA, 2:24.28   (Duluth, 2018)
  15. Molly Seidel,                    USA, 2:24.42   (New York City, 2021)
  16. Malindi Elmore               CAN, 2:24.50  (Houston, 2020)
  17. Mary Ngugi,                     KEN, 2:25.20  (Boston, 2021)
  18. Monicah Ngige,               KEN, 2:25.32  (Boston, 2021)

Peres Jepchirchir and Joyciline Jepkosgei expected to share WMM jackpot prize

Newly crowned New York City marathon champion Peres Jepchirchir and London marathon champion Joyciline Jepkosgei will be battling for the World Marathon Majors jack pot prize.

Following the conclusion of the marathon season on Sunday at the New York, the two marathon queens will be on for the prize following their dominance in the majors.

Jepchirchir, who won New York garnered 25 points to add on her Olympic marathon win is expected to share the prize with Jepkosgei, the winner on 2020 New York City marathon and 2021 London marathon, who have all gained 50 points from the two wins.

Kenya’s Peres Jepchirchir wins the women’s marathon final during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in Sapporo on August 7, 2021. (Photo by Giuseppe CACACE / AFP)

Another Kenyan runner on the prize list will be world marathon record holder Brigid Kosgei, who won silver at the Olympic Games and finished 4th at the London marathon.

Jepchirchir said it will be a tricky way of earnings after enjoying the 2020 and 2021 season winning all her races and setting two world records and reclaiming her world half marathon title.

“This time, it will be a challenge in sharing the prize money but that is not a problem at all,” said Jepchirchir after winning New York City marathon on Sunday.

She also said that, after winning her first world marathon majors title she will have to take a break.

Athletics – London Marathon – London, Britain – October 3, 2021 Kenya’s Joyciline Jepkosgei celebrates winning the elite women’s race REUTERS/Matthew Childs

After closing a season on a high note, the Valencia marathon champion said she had had a successful 2020/2021 season and it is her high time to take a break, as she thinks of the next move next season.

“It has been a good season for me. Both last year and this year’s where I have won in almost all races I have competed in and it will be my time to bond with the family back home,” said Jepchirchir while in the USA after winning her third marathon in all four marathons she has run.

Last year, Jephirchir came from maternity leave to win her second world half marathon title as well as the Valencia marathon.

“My journey has been a success and in all these I owe it to God and the first thing is to give my body time to recover well,” added Jepchirchir.

At the New York City marathon, she won the title in 2:22.39 beating her country mate Viola Cheptoo Lagat and Ethiopian Ababel Yeshaneh to second and third in 2:22:44 as Yeshaneh clocked 2:24.42 respectively.

She said that it was a wonderful win that she expected following her intense training.

“It was wonderful, winning this marathon. The year has been so great. After winning the Olympic title, I did not expect to win this title. I was well prepared despite the fact that there was limited time before the race,” Jepchirchir said.

With world championships and Commonwealth Games coming next year, Jepchirchir was reluctant to commit to the two championships saying she will be making her announcement next year on her next move.

“For now I want to relax and recover my body. Once I resume my training by next year, I will be in for a better season,” said Jepchirchir who will be arriving in the country on Tuesday morning.

 

Nancy Kiprop to battle Peres Jepchirchir at New York Marathon

Three times Vienna City marathon champion, Nancy Kiprop will be targeting podium position at the 50th edition of the New York Marathon that will be held on Sunday (7) November in New York City.

The 42 year-old finished in fourth position with a time of 2:26.21 at the 2019 edition behind Joyciline Jepkosgei who pulled 2:22.38 with Mary Keitany coming home in second in 2:23.32 and Ruti Aga third in a time of 2:25.51.

Kiprop has not competed in any race for two years and returns to the same course she launched her World Marathon majors career following her dominance at the Vienna City marathon.

“I have been off for two years and the same course I competed last, is the same course I will be running. The two years have been long but I have hope of reaching the podium,” said Kiprop who moved from Iten to Kaptagat as her training base.

KIprop will have to battle with the on-form Peres Jepchirchir who holds the fastest time on paper of 2:17.16 that she got at the 2020 Valencia Marathon.

She will also face Nancy Kiprop who was fourth the last time the race was held in 2019, and Viola Lagat, the younger sister of five-time Olympian Bernard Lagat.

While Lagat will be racing his elder brother the five times Olympian Bernard will be part of the broadcast team that will be doing commentary.

 

Joyciline Jepkosgei wins the 2021 London Marathon

Kenya’s Joyciline Jepkosgei became the seventh fastest woman of all time when she took the top honor at the 2021 Virgin London Marathon that was held on Sunday (3) in the streets of London.

The reigning New York Marathon champion also set a new personal best when she cut the tape in 2:17.43 on her debut in the British capital, becoming the seventh fastest woman in history.

The 28-year-old, who was a pacemaker in London two years ago, finished 15 seconds ahead of Ethiopian Degitu Azimeraw whose compatriot Ashete Bekere came third. “Some years back I was pacing [in] London so it was better preparation,” Jepkosgei said. “And the day [winning the race] has finally come… I’m privileged to be in London.”

The world women marathon record holder Brigid Kosgei, competing eight weeks after claiming silver at the Tokyo Olympics, was aiming for a third consecutive victory in London. The 27-year-old rallied briefly but finished fourth in 2:18.40.

 

 

Brigid Kosgei targets third straight London Marathon title

Tokyo Olympic silver medallist, Brigid Kosgei will attempt to win her third successive women’s title at the London Marathon that will be held on Sunday (3) in the Streets of London.

The 27-year-old, who is recovering from the heat and humidity of Sapporo in Japan in early August, is likely to face considerably cooler and damper conditions in the British capital.

The worry is whether she has recovered and rediscovered sufficient fitness given the short turnaround since the Games, where she finished in second place behind Peres Jepchirchir.

“My body was very tired after the Olympics but I did a lot of preparation to correct this and now I have come to London to do my best,” said Kosgei, who took only a couple of days off after her marathon at the Games before getting back into training.

On claiming a hat-trick of titles in London this weekend, Kosgei added: “I love London so I would really like to do that here. I am ready as I have prepared well as I want to defend my title.”

Mary Keitany, who retired a few days ago, won London three times in recent years – the latter with a women-only world record of 2:17.01. This is a natural target for Kosgei, who holds the outright women’s world record with with a time of 2:14.04 that she got at the 2019 Chicago Marathon.

Paula Radcliffe also won three London Marathon titles, but Katrin Dörre from Germany will be remembered in history books as the only woman who has won the race back to back from 1992 to 1994.

Kosgei won her first London crown two years ago in 2:18.20 but then returned last year during the pandemic to win an elite- only race in 2:18.58.

The World women record-holder was speaking at the pre-event press conferences in a hotel just outside Windsor along with rival runners Joyciline Jepkosgei of Kenya and Birhane Dibaba of Ethiopia after they had arrived on a charter flight from east Africa.

The East African elite athletes were carried in a special flight which was arranged by the race organizers due to the pandemic.

Jepkosgei is the reigning New York City Marathon champion while Dibaba is a two-time winner in the Tokyo Marathon.

WHO IS Yalemzerf Yehualaw?

Yalemzerf Yehualaw may only have been running internationally for the past couple of years but her journey in the sport began when she was at school.

Growing up in West Gojjam, in a village in the Amhara region of Ethiopia north of Addis Ababa, she was the eldest of six siblings and showed her talent for athletics with wins on the track, road and cross country.

Winning 3000m and 5000m youth titles, the NN Running Team has explained, saw her talent recognised and she formed part of the Ethiopian Athletics Federation Academy system in Addis Ababa.

Then in 2017 she joined coach Tessema Abshero. “Many Ethiopian athletes have a natural gift,” Abshero told the NN Running Team, “but Yalemzerf had three very good qualities; speed, endurance and good core strength.”
Yehualaw worked towards her first overseas race, which was to be the 2019 Rabat Half Marathon. There she ran 1:09:13 to win by almost three minutes and then she returned to Ethiopia to compete over 10,000m on the track at the Ethiopian Championships, finishing fifth in 32:21.0 in a race won by Letesenbet Gidey, who would go on to break world records in the 5000m and 10,000m.

Later that year Yehualaw secured a place on the Ethiopian team for the African Games, which meant a return to Rabat and another win as, clocking 1:10:26, she broke the Games record. Her next race was the Delhi Half Marathon, where she improved her PB to 1:06:01 before a 10km win at the Great Ethiopian Run (31:55). She brought 2019 to a close with another win, clocking 1:07:34 at the Xiamen Half Marathon in China.

The year 2020 started with a sixth-place finish at the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon despite stomach problems and she continued her preparations for the World Athletics Half Marathon Championships in Gdynia, Poland. But the pandemic forced the global event’s postponement and Yehualaw went back to train in her home village. Groups gradually returned to training in Addis Ababa and Yehualaw’s focus remained on the World Half Marathon Championships, rescheduled for October.

Her coach believed she could win a medal there and he was right, as Yehualaw improved to a PB of 1:05:19 to get bronze, despite slipping in the closing stages, as race winner Peres Jepchirchir ran a women-only world record of 1:05.16.

Just six weeks later, Yehualaw was back in action at the Delhi Half Marathon and this time she claimed the win, again running a PB of 1:04.46 which at that time was the second-fastest ever women’s half marathon. She ended the year in style by winning the Nationale-Nederlanden San Silvestre Vallecana 10km in Madrid in 31:17.

Yehualaw picked up from where she left off in 2021, winning the 10,000m at the Olympic candidate trial competition before a return to the roads. In Istanbul in April she went quicker still in the half marathon, improving to 1:04:40 for a time which then placed her third on the world all-time list.
Her Olympic hopes were dashed when she placed fourth in the Ethiopian Trials 10,000m and did not make the team for the Games in Tokyo but she instead put her energy into her next road race – the Antrim Coast Half Marathon.
After a spell spent training in Seefeld in Austria, Yehualaw made the trip to Northern Ireland with her eye on Chepngetich’s world record mark. She remained on pace throughout the race and her dream was realized when she crossed the finish line with a time of 1:03.44 on the clock. No other woman has ever run under 64 minutes for the distance.

“I have tried twice before to break the world record but it didn’t happen,” she said on the live BBC stream. “I’m so happy it happened today in Larne.”

STATS

World half marathon record progression (mixed)

1:06:44 Elana Meyer (RSA) Tokyo 1999
1:06:25 Lornah Kiplagat (NED) Udine 2007
1:05:50 Mary Keitany (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2011
1:05:12 Florence Kiplagat (KEN) Barcelona 2014
1:05:09 Florence Kiplagat (KEN) Barcelona 2015
1:05:06 Peres Jepchirchir (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2017
1:04:52 Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) Prague 2017
1:04:51 Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) Valencia 2017
1:04:31 Ababel Yeshaneh (ETH) Ras Al Khaimah 2020
1:04:02 Ruth Chepngetich (KEN) Istanbul 2021**
1:03:44 Yalemzerf Yehualaw (ETH) Larne 2021**

World half marathon all-time list

1:03:44 Yalemzerf Yehualaw (ETH) Larne 2021
1:04:02 Ruth Chepngetich (KEN) Istanbul 2021
1:04:31 Ababel Yeshaneh (ETH) Ras Al Khaimah 2020
1:04:49 Brigid Kosgei (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2020
1:04:51 Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) Valencia 2017
1:04:51 Hellen Obiri (KEN) Istanbul 2021
1:04:52 Fancy Chemutai (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2018
1:04:55 Mary Keitany (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2018
1:05:04 Joan Melly (KEN) Prague 2018
1:05:06 Peres Jepchirchir (KEN) Ras Al Khaimah 2017

Yalemzerf Yehualaw’s progression

(half marathon)
2019: 1:06:01
2020: 1:04:46
2021: 1:03:44

Source: keirradnedge.com/

Brigid Kosgei to defend her London marathon title

World marathon record holder Brigid Kosgei will defend her London Marathon title that will be held on 3rd October in London.

The 27-year-old who won a silver Medal behind Peres Jepchirchir at the just concluded Tokyo Olympic Games will be aiming for her third consecutive London Marathon victory.

“Last year’s win was very special, particularly given what the whole world was going through – it was fantastic just to have the London Marathon organised and even more so to be the winner,” Kosgei was quoted saying in a statement from the race organisers.

The Elgeyo-Marakwet County born beat the previous world record set 16 years by Paula Radcliffe by 1 minute 24 seconds in Chicago in 2019.

Kosgei will be, racing again just eight weeks after the very testing conditions of the Olympic Games marathon in Sapporo, will be challenged by reigning TCS New York City Marathon champion Joyciline Jepkosgei and six other women who have run under two hours and 20 minutes.

The elite women’s field includes Ethiopians Roza Dereje (ETH), whose PB of 2:18.30 makes her the tenth-fastest female marathoner of all time, and Birhane Dibaba of a PB of 2:18.35, who won the Tokyo Marathon in 2018 and 2015 and finished second in the same race on three other occasions (2020, 2017 and 2014).

Valary Jemeli also from Kenya has been included in the star studded list carrying on her shoulder a personal best of 2:19.10, that she got at the 2019 Frankfurt Marathon. Ethiopia’s Zeineba Yimer  and Tigist Girma who have 2:19.28 and 2:19.50 are also lined up for the top honors battle.

Also included is Australia’s Sinead Diver, who has had two top 10 Virgin Money London Marathon finishes in the past two years and was tenth at the Tokyo Olympics.

 

Joyciline Jepkosgei eyes New Delhi Half Marathon title

After clinching Family Bank Half marathon title in Eldoret, reigning world half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei will be eyeing for another title at the New Delhi half marathon that will be held in New Delhi, India.

This race has been dominated by Kenyan athletes, will be good for Valencia half marathon champion as she prepares to hit marathon in New Year.

The Iten based run will be in action on 21st October as she faces 2017 Chicago marathon winner Tirunesh Dibaba.

Dibaba is a three time Olympic champion and the same scriot will be written since they met first at the Ras al Khaimah (RAK) Hal Marathon when Jepkosgei finished third and the Ethiopian legend was fifth; secondly in May this year at the Manchester 10km in Great Britain when Dibaba won in 31:08 to 31:57.

The 25 year-old won the 2017 Prague half marathon with a world record of 1:04:52 before bringing her record down to 1:04:51 at Valencia half marathon.

The world half marathon silver medalist will be chasing to lower the course record of 1:06.54 that was set by Mary Keitany in 2009.

Mo Farah bids to create Great North Run history

Four years ago when Sir Mo Farah won the first of his four consecutive Great North Run titles he admitted he was still consumed with fear over what life on the road would bring.

Farah was still two years away from calling time on his glittering track career and remained unsure whether he was entirely cut out to translate that success to the world of elite marathon running.

But the 35-year-old returns to Newcastle on Sunday battle-hardened from two full years of mixing it with the world’s best distance runners – and intent on using the race to pave the way to glory over the longer distance.

Victory this weekend will make Farah the first man to win the Great North Run five times, and deliver the ideal preparations for his appearance next month at the Chicago Marathon.

Farah said: “I’m still learning and understanding more and I’m not afraid to mix it in. In 2014, I was afraid to mix it because it was their territory and I was a track runner. But now I’m not afraid of anything.

“It’s a totally different challenge and I’m enjoying every day of it. My goal is to win a major marathon. For a track runner the highlight is the Olympics, and in the marathon the biggest thing you can do is win a major race.”

This year’s Great North Run presents a different dimension for Farah, who admitted his previous victories in the race have signalled the end of the season and a rare opportunity to binge-eat sticky toffee pudding.

Farah, who has run the London Marathon twice, coming third in April, is closing in on his latest career goal and has not under-estimated the importance of making history in the process on Tyneside.

“My aim (in Newcastle) is to run a decent time – I’ve still got another week from this point so it will be a good test for me on Sunday to see where I am and what I can do,” said Farah.

“I’ve never gone into this race having had this amount of training. I’ve always gone into it thinking – ‘Great North Run, finish, sticky toffee pudding’.

“But after this it’s straight back to my training camp in Flagstaff to prepare for Chicago. Hopefully I will get the job done and there will be a lot of stuff to take back. Doing that as the first five-time winner would be amazing.”

Farah’s biggest challenge is likely to come from Kenya’s Daniel Wanjiru, winner of the 2017 London Marathon. Vivian Cheruiyot and Joyciline Jepkosgei are favourites for the women’s race.

Source: standard.co.uk

World Record Holder Jepkosgei out of Birell Grand Prix

World 10km record holder Kenya’s Joyciline Jepkosgei will not defend her Birell Prague Grand Prix on Saturday (September 8).

According to the organisers, the 23-year-old who ran 29 minutes 43 seconds at the Birell Prague Grand Prix to eclipse her previous record of 30:04 set in the Czech capital in April last year is not on the start list.

The development leaves the 2017 runner-up Fancy Chemutai, headlines the women’s contest and is the race favourite to emerge as the new women’s.

Chemutai clocked 30:06 last year, moving her to third on the world all-time list before moving on to set a half marathon PB of 1:05:36 in Valencia and reduced that mark to 1:04:52 – just one second shy of the world record – to win at the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon earlier this year.

The Kenyan’s only performance since then has been a half marathon victory in Zwolle in a time of 1:09:38.

In contention is Caroline Kikirui a third place finisher behind Chemutai at the Ras Al-Khaimah Half Marathon in a PB of 1:05:07 and finished second at the Prague Half Marathon two months later in 1:06:09, passing through 10km in a PB of 30:28.

Kipkirui who shifted  her attention to the track, clocking a world-leading PB of 8:29.05 to win the 3000m at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Doha before winning  the Falmouth Road Race in the USA and then placed fourth in the 5000m at the IAAF Diamond League final in Zurich 11 days later

An unknown Kenyan athlete Dorcas Tuitoek, heads to Prague off the back of strong victories in Paderborn and Oelde, clocking 31:00 and 31:26 respectively.

Mary Munanu a formidable runner is likely to make a Kenyan sweep of the podium. The 21-year-old has a PB of 31:20 and a best this year of 31:34.

Most of the Czech fans lining the streets in Prague will be there to support European bronze medalist Eva Vrabcova-Nyvltova.

The 32-year-old former cross-country skier, clocked a national record of 2:26:31 at the European in Berlin.

Given that was less than a month ago, she might not yet be fully recovered, but she’ll use this race as  part of her preparation for the New York City Marathon later this year keen to get close to her 10km PB of 33:01.