Tag Archives: Joyce Chepkirui

Joyce Chepkirui banned for four years for doping

Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) has banned long-distance runner Joyce Chepkirui from Kenya for four years in a case concerning her Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) which is a violation of the World Athletics Anti-Doping Rules.

The 33-year-old had been provisionally suspended since June 2019, after an expert panel studied anomalies in her blood samples collected by AIU between 2016 and 2017.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) has upheld the appeal filed by the Athletics Integrity Unit, and her four-year period of ineligibility has been back-dated to start from 28 June 2019.

Her results from April 6, 2016 and August 4, 2017 that include her bronze medal at the Boston Marathon in April 2016 has been revoked.

Chepkirui is the 2014 Commonwealth Games 10,000m champions and also the 2014 African 10000m champion.

Chepkirui star stated shinning at the 2012 Discovery Kenya Cross Country meet and then winning the  National title at the Kenyan Cross Country Championships, before going on to win the gold medal and team title at the 2012 African Cross Country Championships in Cape Town, South Africa

She also won the  2015 Amsterdam Marathon title before placing third at the Boston Marathon and fourth at the New York City Marathon in 2016.

Kenya is still placed under category A and is ranked alongside Ethiopia, Belarus and Ukraine. It remains one of the countries AIU considers as having the highest risk level for doping or ADRVs and not just the risk of having more doping cases.

Road Kings Kitwara, Oloititip , Kabuu Complete Doping Ban Race

Sammy Kitwara and Nicholas Kosgei are some of the Kenyan athletes who have completed their doping ban after serving their term that was imposed by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU).

AIU, the body established by by International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) now World Athletics (WA) in 2017, has managed to conclusively handle 250 doping cases with Kenya among those countries with most banned athletes.

Kitwara, who was banned for anti-doping rule violations with the presence of a Prohibited Substance (Terbutaline) (Article 2.1) was handed 16 months since 17 March 2019 that was completed just as Kosgei, who was banned when he was tested positive for Prohibited Substance (Prednisone) (Article 2.1), 16 months ineligibility from 2 February 2020.

The first Kenya elite athlete to fall under the shock of AIU was 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Jelagat Sumgong in April 2017 and so far AIU has banned 36 Kenyans.

Sumgong, Mercy Jerotich Kibarus and Salome Jerono Biwott were handed the longest banned period for eight years.

Among the thirty-six elite athletes, ten have so far served their full banning sentence and are free to engage in participating in any race in the world.

Two other athletes; Alfred Kipketer and Benjamin Ngandu Ndegwa will have their ban end by the end of this month (November).

Two cases are still at the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS) as they are yet to be determined. The athletes, Joyce Chepkirui and Daniel Kinyua Wanjiru have appealed their sentencing.

 Below is the list:  

  1. Suleiman Kipse Simotwo,  Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone) (Article 2.1) 4 years ineligibility from 14 July 2017.
     
  2. Eliud Magut Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone) (Article 2.1), 4 years ineligibility from 14 July 2017.
  1. Lucy Kabuu Wangui, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Morphine) (Article 2.1) Use of a Prohibited Substance/Method (Morphine) (Article 2.2), 2 years ineligibility from 1 August 2018.
     
  2. Samson Mungai Kagia, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (methylprednisolone) (Article 2.1) Use of a Prohibited Substance/Method (methylprednisolone) (Article 2.2), 2 years ineligibility from 14 October 2018.
  1. Hilary Kepkosgei Yego, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone) (Article 2.1), 4 years ineligibility from 27 April 2017: 
  1. Sammy Kitwara, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Terbutaline) (Article 2.1),  16 months ineligibility from 17 March 2019.
  1. Alex Korio Oliotiptip, Whereabouts Failures (Article 2.4), 2 years ineligibility from 19 July 2019.
  1. Philip Cheruiyot Kangogo, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Higenamine) (Article 2.1) Use of a prohibited Substance (Article 2.2), 2 years ineligibility from 31 July 2019.
  1. James Mwangi Wangari, Presence / Use of a Prohibited Substance (Testosterone) (Article 2.1and Article 2.2), 4 years ineligibility from 19 March 2017 DQ results from 19 March 2017.
  1. Nicholas Kiptoo Kosgei, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Prednisone) (Article 2.1), 16 months ineligibility from 2 February 2020.
  1. Alfred Kipketer, Whereabouts Failures (Article 2.4), 2 years ineligibility from 26 November 2019.
  1. Benjamin Ngandu Ndegwa, Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Nandrolone) (Article 2.1), 4 years ineligibility from 17 November 2017: DQ results: 6 June 2015 to 17 November 2017 

Kipsang and Kiplagat focus on New York despite running in Berlin last month

Defending champion Geoffrey Kamworor leads a host of stars to next month’s New York Marathon.

Kamworor, who is the three-time World Half Marathon champion, will face stiff competition from several of his compatriots in the 42km race during the ‘Big Apple’ race.

Kamworor clocked 2:10:53 to win the event last year.

The defending champion will be up against former winner and world record holder Wilson Kipsang, who competed at last month’s Berlin Marathon, finishing third in 2:06:48.

The 2017 London Marathon champion, Daniel Wanjiru, will also be in the mix.

Wanjiru has a personal best of 2:05:21 set at the Amsterdam Marathon two years ago and will fancy his chances of performing well at the event.

Former New York City Marathon champion Stanley Biwott will also be seeking to reclaim the crown he won in 2015 in 2:10:34 while Stephen Sambu, who clinched the New York City Half Marathon in 2016 in 1:01:16, has also been entered.

In the women’s category, two- time world marathon champion Edna Kiplagat, who finished fourth at the Berlin three weeks ago in 2:21:18, aims to unseat last year’s champion Sharlene Flanagan of the USA.

London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot will also be seeking to win her second marathon crown after her exploit in the British capital in April.

Mary Keitany will be chasing her fourth New York City Marathon crown after victories in 2014-2016.

Keitany is one the country’s most decorated marathoners with wins in other big city marathons including London, where she has won three times (2011, 2012 and 2016).

US-based Sally Kipyego made her marathon debut in 2016 in New York, finishing second to Keitany in 2:28.01 and will be aiming to go one place better.

Chepkirui targets Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon course record

Former Commonwealth and African 10,000m champion Joyce Chepkirui of Kenya will face a stiff challenge as she returns to the Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon in the Czech Republic on Saturday.

The Prague Half Marathon champion leads a horde of eight Kenyans at the race. The team departed Nairobi on Wednesday for the Czech capital.

Ethiopia’s world half marathon champion Netsanet Gudeta is fastest on the entry list but Chepkirui is banking on her endurance and speed to turn the tables and claim the title.

“I have had very good training and will be happy to see who the opposition lining up against me is. I want to run a fast time and look at making the Kenya team for the World Championships in 2019 in Qatar,” she said Wednesday in Nairobi.

Chepkirui said she will not be seeking a slot in the Kenya team at the Africa Athletics Championships in Asaba, Nigeria, but will be keen to improve her performance on the road.

“I have no plans to compete on the track this season. My focus is on the road race and hopefully, I will string together good results and put my name up for selection to the marathon team for the World Championships next year,” she added.

Gudeta of Ethiopia is the leading athlete, based on time. She was second at the Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon last year, running 27 seconds quicker than the 66:38 course record of Mary Keitany from 2015.

But Chepkirui, who ran 66:19 to win the Prague Half Marathon in 2014, will be the athlete to watch.

Alongside Chepkirui, Kenya will also have Antonina Kwambai (68:07) and Linet Masai (69:33) who are returning from maternity leave and are keen to restart their road racing careers.

Other athletes to watch out for will be Ethiopia’s Aselefech Mergia (67:21), and Trihas Gebre of Spain (69:57), who is the top European along with in-form Frenchwoman Clemence Calvin.

Eva Vrabcova-Nyvltova leads the domestic entries. Organizers have invited seven athletes who have previously run under the 70-minute mark.

Ethiopia’s Jemal Yimer, who was second in Ras Al-Khaimah in United Arab Emirates in February in a time of 59:00 is the fastest of four sub-60 runners in the men’s field.

He will have to contend with Kenyans Gilbert Masai (59:31), Justus Kangogo (59:31), Stephen Kiprop (59:44) and Abel Kipchumba (60:05), while Jiri Homolac (63:23) is the top domestic entrant.

xinhuanet.com