Tag Archives: Joshua Cheptegei

Joshua Cheptegei to identify and support athletes

In a bid to break barriers that deter athletes from fulfilling their potential in Sebei sub region, the World and Olympic champion Joshua Cheptegei, under the Joshua Cheptegei Foundation will seek to identify, nurture and groom talent at grass root level to further enhance and support talent in the region.

On March 12, at the Chemwania Sports Complex, the 25-year-old under the his foundation organised the first edition of track and field events in Kween District  which attracted athletes from Bukwo and Kapchorwa with a promise to support the top performers.

The athletes who were between the ages of 13 to 17 years participated in categories of including 100m,200m,400m,600m,1500m, 3000m and relays among others.  The event attracted over 400 athletes from over 15 clubs both national and local clubs namely, Joshua Cheptegei Athletics Club, Police, Global Sports and Tuku Africa.

In December, the foundation organised the annual Christmas Run which also attracted over 800 runners and winners walked away with scholarships to join Joshua Cheptegei Junior School.

Cheptegei says the major objective of this is to help under privileged talented athletes in the region to become world champions and also ensure continuity when he phases out.

“We thought of having an avenue where we can be able to nurture talent because we really want to have a new generation of sports men and champions who can be able to represent the nation when we phase out,” said Cheptegei.

Selemon Barega to battle title holder Berihu Aregawi In Rome

Olympic 10,000m champion Selemon Barega will take on Diamond Trophy holder Berihu Aregawi in a deep elite field in the 5000m race at the fifth leg of Diamond League meeting that will be on 9th June 2022 in Rome, Italy.

Barega who is the fifth fastest runner (behind Joshua Cheptegei, Kenenisa Bekele, Haile Gebrselassie, and Daniel Komen) in history with a time of 12:43.02 that he got when winning the 2018 Diamond Trophy in Brussels four years ago.

The 22 year-old is a two-time 3000m World Indoor Championship medallist, taking a silver in 2018, and a gold in 2022 in Belgrade, will take on his compatriot, Aregawi who is reigning Diamond League champion.

Aregawi is the 2018 Summer Youth Olympics 3000m silver medallist and he is also the bronze medalist in the 10000m race at the 2018 World Athletics U20 Champion.

The 21 year-old set the fifth fastest time of 7:26.20 in 3000m history at the Indoor Meeting Karlsruhe which was the first of this season’s seven World Indoor Tour Gold meetings.

Barega and Aregawi will be joined by the double World 5000m Champiom, Muktar Edris and Yomif Kejelcha, who claimed the Diamond League title in 2015 and set a 3000m Diamond League record of 7:26.25 in Oslo last year.

That time bettered the previous series record of 7:26.64 that had been set by Uganda’s Jacob Kiplimo a year earlier in the same city.

Yomif Kejecha runs the World third fastest time at Road to Records

The 2019 World silver medallist, Yomif Kejecha took the honors in men’s’ 5km race with the third fastest time ever at the Road to Records Race that was held on Saturday (30) Herzogenaurach, Germany.

The 24 year-old who came to this race with a World mile record of 3:31.51 that he set in 2019 in Boston was on another level after a series of injury that have kept him out for sometime but proved that he is back in shape as he thrashed a strong field that included Olympic fourth finisher in 5000m, Nicholas Kimeli.

The 2016 World Indoor 3000m champion was too good for the Kenyan as he accelerated his speed with 300m remaining to cut the tape in a World leading time and a new personal best of 0.12:53 with the latter coming home in second three seconds later.

Only the World record holder Berihu Aregawi and Joshua Cheptegei have gone faster over 5km than Kejelcha.

Bahrain’s Birhanu Balew wrote history as he finished third with a new National Record of 0:13:07.

 

Uganda Athletics Federation bans Joshua Cheptegei, Jacob Kiplimo and 62 others

Double Olympic champion Joshua Cheptegei and World Half Marathon record holder, Jacob Kiplimo are among the athletes that have been banned by the Uganda Athletics Federation (UAF).

The ban which has been received as shock to the nation has affected a total of 65 athletes including some top names from established clubs.

The ban that was announced on Saturday was sanctioned on grounds of failure to surface for requisite trials and other related misconducts.

While speaking to the New Vision Sports, UAF director of competitions, Faustino Kiwa  said, “These are athletes who either failed to compete after registration for the ongoing national trials.

“Some of the athletes affected registered twice and failed to turn up for the last two trials,” Kiwa revealed.

Kiwa who doubles as a qualified coach advanced said, “The reason we decided to start suspending athletes is that; failure to turn up even after registration messes up with the start-list.”

The list of those suspended includes; UPDF’s Rebecca Cheptegei, Prison’s Philip Kiplimo, Allan Kiprotich of Arise and Shine club, Brenda Aciro ((UPA), and Victor Kwemoi of Uganda Police.

Prisons Geofrey Nyeko, Zamura Chebet, and Philip Kiplimo are banned.

Police Geofrey Onen, Victor Kwemoi, and Elisha Chemutai will not run again until the next two trials are over.

For More names: New Vision Sports

Mo Farah’s racing comeback

Distance running legend returns to the roads of London and Manchester in May but what else does the summer of 2022 hold in store?

After signing up to race the Vitality London 10,000 on the roads of the British capital on May 2, Mo Farah has now announced he will be running the Great Manchester Run on May 22.

Despite turning 39 years old today (March 23) and enduring an injury-hit summer in 2021 which saw him fail to make the British Olympic team for Tokyo, there are signs he could be entering a surprisingly busy racing period.

After his disappointing season last year he talked about having one last hurrah – a big farewell race somewhere to mark the end of a career that has brought him, among other things, 10 global track titles. But there is now speculation he could be involved in this summer’s major championships on the track. Who knows, a return to the London Marathon in October could even be on the cards too.

Firstly, let’s stick to what we know. As Farah is racing 10km on the roads of London on May 2 and Manchester on May 22, this means we can pretty much rule him out of racing in the Müller Birmingham Diamond League on May 21.

Farah does not seem afraid of putting his reputation on the line either, incidentally, as the Great Manchester Run is also set to feature Stewart McSweyn, the Australian who holds the Oceania record for 1500m, mile and 3000m in addition to having clocked 27:23.80 for 10,000m on the track.

In addition, Andy Butchart is set to race and has been in good shape recently after having run 27:36.77 for 10,000m in California this month to break Ian Stewart’s 45-year-old Scottish record.

So if Farah’s road races in May go well, what are his options? Surprisingly he has never won a Commonwealth title and with the event on home soil in Birmingham it must be tempting.

The consensus is that he would struggle on the track against the likes of Joshua Cheptegei and Selemon Barega in the World Championships in Oregon in July. But Christian Malcolm, the head coach of the British team, has suggested it is “50/50”.

Speaking as last weekend’s World Indoor Championships in Belgrade drew to a close, Malcolm said: “Sir Mo is working hard and training. We will see how he goes in the summer. But he’s at that age now where you have to take it week-by-week, month-by-month, see where you are at in training.”

On the chances of him competing in Oregon, Malcolm added: “It’s possible. We don’t know at the moment. It’s 50-50 if I am being honest with you. Hopefully we will know a little bit more over the next six weeks.

“Does he still have a talent? Yes, he does. So let’s see if his body can handle it. Like I said, over the next six weeks Mo will know a little bit more about where he is at.”

As for the Great Manchester Run, Farah last took part in the event in 2018 when he outkicked Moses Kipsiro to clock 28:27.

Farah said: “I’m pleased to say the injury problems I had last year are now behind me, training has been going well and I am happy with the shape I am showing.

“Any time I race in the UK it is exciting for me because I love running in front of my home fans and I want to give my best for them.  I had an amazing reception in Manchester when I won the event in 2018 so I’m looking forward to racing on the streets of the city again later this year.”

It will be fascinating to see if Farah’s form during May is close to his best or whether there is little improvement on last year when he struggled at the British 10,000m Championships in Birmingham to clock 27:50.64 before barely improving three weeks later to run 27:47.04 in an invitation 10,000m at the Olympic trials in Manchester.

How will he fare, too, if he comes up against the rising force of Marc Scott, who beat Farah in Birmingham last year despite not being 100% fit himself and has since won the Great North Run, clocked 12:57.08 for 5000m indoors and on Saturday won bronze in the 3000m at the World Indoor Championships?

Source: athleticsweekly.com

Berihu Aregawi – fast times on the track, but slow and steady approach off it

The Kidane Mihret Church in the Kotobe neighbourhood in Addis Ababa is busy most afternoons. Ethiopian Orthodox Christians in the area often come to pray or give money and food to homeless who congregate around the church’s gates. Many wear gabi – a traditional white homemade cotton cloth – draped over their heads and shoulders.

Nearly every afternoon Berihu Aregawi can be seen walking, often in his orange and blue tracksuit, to his afternoon training session.

Kidane Mihret sits neatly at an important crossroads to get to the Yeka Forest in Addis Ababa, a small runner’s oasis reachable by a quick 15-minute walk from a bustling neighbourhood. Between 4-6pm dozens of Ethiopian athletes go to the forest to do their famous zig-zag jogs through eucalyptus trees, a tradition that’s well sedimented in the soil, with clearly-trodden paths.

Over the course of the past eight years, Aregawi has seldom missed one of these sessions. He made this daily journey long before he followed up a fourth-place finish at the Olympics with a Wanda Diamond League victory in Zurich in 2021. It was true leading up to his world 5km record on the final day of 2021 when he ran 12:49 in Barcelona. It was true before running his world indoor lead of 7:26.20 over 3000m in Karlsruhe. And it will continue to be true as the 20-year-old prepares for the World Athletics Indoor Championships Belgrade 22, and competitions moving forward.

Berihu Aregawi wins the 5000m at the Wanda Diamond League final in Zurich (© Matt Quine)

Many Ethiopian athletes pursue long distance running to change their lives, and as soon as they come into some money, they start making investments to accrue more wealth and status. Aregawi is in no rush to do so.

“Not yet, not yet,” he commonly refrains, when asked about buying a home, a car, or even a television. “I don’t do much outside of training besides resting, but I do like to watch training videos and running content on YouTube.”

Aregawi uses his phone and has been inspired, amid a lot of running content, by the well-known Spartan lifestyle Eliud Kipchoge has become famous for. He’s watched many of the short documentaries where understanding English is not a prerequisite for getting a sense of the humility that some of the world’s top athletes share.

He also studies racing tactics by his Ethiopian role models, Kenenisa Bekele, Haile Gebreselassie, and, notably, Hagos Gebrhiwet. Like Aregawi, Gebrhiwet is also from the Tigray region of Ethiopia – the northern most state in Ethiopia that has been embroiled in a civil war since November 2020. Aregawi grew up with five younger sisters and one younger brother in the countryside and began running in local competitions, much to the chagrin of his father, who viewed the pursuit as too risky of an endeavour. Sceptical of the athletic profession, Aregawi’s father wanted him to take a more traditional path and ensure he could help to take care of the family. But once he was offered a club position in Addis, his father’s mind gradually changed.

Berihu Aregawi and Jakob Ingebrigtsen at the Wanda Diamond League meeting in Lausanne (© Matt Quine)

“When I was starting out I really wanted to be like Hagos,” Aregawi said, “He was really the first from my region and it’s easier to identify with someone that comes from the same place you come from.”

Not too long later, he became Gebrhiwet’s training partner, “Training with Hagos on the national team has given me big steps in my training. He’s also been a really good friend to me, and always offered me help when I have adversity.”

After training for two years in Addis Ababa, Aregawi was selected for his first national team in 2018, when he competed at the World U20 Championships in Tampere, Finland. Aregawi finished third in the 10,000m, behind Rhonex Kipruto of Kenya and Jacob Kiplimo of Uganda.

“To represent Ethiopia for the first time and come in third was a really big deal,” he remembers of his first international trip. Finland in July could not have been more different to Ethiopia at that time of year. Ethiopia’s geographical position means the sun rises and sets at about the same time throughout the year, and July and August are characterised by heavy, sometimes torrential, rains. Mid-July in Tampere, by contrast, was sunny, temperate, and had only a few hours of darkness each day.

After his first podium finish in Tampere, Aregawi signed his first contract and returned to Ethiopia with the goal of representing the country at the Olympics. His incremental improvement has evidently been working, but until this past year, his progression has been overshadowed by some of his Olympic teammates, like Selemon Barega, who won the Olympic 10,000m title.

While many Olympians began to tire on the Wanda Diamond League circuit, Aregawi appeared to gain steam, culminating in a victory at the final 5000m held for the first time on the track built around Zurich’s city centre.

Since winning the Diamond League title, Aregawi has made some more changes relating to his training, returning to regular training with his club, Ethiopia Electric, and coach Melaku. His training partners are not big names, yet, but he’s enjoying working with Solomon Berihu and Haftam Abadi, two of several members of his club. Other changes in lifestyle can remain on the backburner.

“It’s important to stay humble and patient,” Aregawi said. “I don’t want to rush into the next stage of life because I still have big goals I haven’t accomplished.”

Berihu Aregawi breaks the world 5km record in Barcelona (© Xavi Ballart)

The changes appeared to have worked. In November, he thought he broke Joshua Cheptegei’s world 5km record when it appeared he finished under 12:50 in Lille, France, but the official results showed 12:52. One month later, on New Year’s Eve, he ran 12:49 in Barcelona to claim the record alongside Ejegayehu Taye, another Ethiopian rising distance talent.

Then, in January 2022, Aregawi claimed the world’s top indoor time over 3000m in Karlsruhe, Germany, running the second half of his race completely alone. His time of 7:26.20 puts him fifth on the world indoor all-time list and gives him the top time heading into the World Indoor Championships.

Due to the conflict in Tigray, Aregawi has had minimal conflict with his family members over the past two years. With phone and internet mostly disabled in Tigray, Aregawi has been running, and excelling, looking forward to a time when he can share his success his family.

Until then, when asked about lavish celebrations, Aregawi’s response is one of caution and gradualness. “Not yet, not yet,” he continues to say – an odd refrain beckoning for slowness from one of the world’s fastest runners.

Joshua Cheptegei misses the 10km world Record in Cannes

Double Olympic champion Joshua Cheptegei ran the World Leading time at the Cannes 10k Road Race that was held on Sunday (6) in Cannes, France.

The 25-year-old turned made Sunday morning into a special one with a zestful and eloquent as he cut tape with a blisteringly French all-comers record of 26:49 which is also the sixth fastest time in the world.

“Happy to see where I stand. It’s great to start my season with a World Lead. This gives me confidence for my track season,” said Cheptegei.

Every World Record in the Wanda Diamond League

When Karsten Warholm clocked 46.70 at his home meet in Oslo last July, it was the end of his long quest to break an almost three-decades old world record and cement his status as the fastest 400m hurdler in athletics history.

The astonishing performance also made him the seventh athlete ever to break a world record in a major discipline on the Wanda Diamond League circuit. As we look forward to another season of world-class performances in 2022, here’s a look back at every single Wanda Diamond League world record to date.

Watch all the world records on the Wanda Diamond League YouTube page.

 Aries Merritt – Brussels 2012

US hurdler Aries Merritt became the first world-record breaker in the Diamond League when he stormed to a historic 12.80 in the men’s 110m hurdles in Brussels. The performance also secured him his first and only Diamond Trophy.

 Genzebe Dibaba – Monaco 2015

Genzebe Dibaba was crowned 1500m world champion in Beijing in 2015, but she had already made it to the top of the world a few weeks earlier with a breathtaking 3:50.07 at the Stade Louis II. The dominant victory made her the series’ second world-record breaker, and the first of many at the Monaco Diamond League.

 Kendra Harrison – London 2016

Having suffered heartbreak at the US Olympic trials earlier that year, Kendra Harrison was a woman on a mission in the 2016 Diamond League as she stormed to victory after victory in the 100m hurdles. She crowned an impressive, title-winning season with a world record of 12.20 in London, a performance which left even her gaping in disbelief at the clock.

 Beatrice Chepkoech – Monaco 2018

Kenyan long-distance specialist Beatrice Chepkoech was in brilliant form in 2018, and she made it count in Monaco, clocking a 3000m steeplechase world record of 8:44.32, becoming the fifth athlete to break a world record at Herculis and the second after Dibaba to do so in the Diamond League era.

 Sifan Hassan – Monaco 2019

Dutch star Sifan Hassan had a twinkle in her eye when she was asked about a potential world record ahead of the Monaco Diamond League in 2019, and that proved a prelude to her glittering performance on the track. Her 4:12.33 made her the fastest female miler in history, and gave her another boost on her way to a Diamond League double in that season.

 Joshua Cheptegei – Monaco 2020

In a season truncated by the coronavirus pandemic, there was the only men’s 5000m race in 2020, but what a race it was. Monaco completed a hat-trick of world-record breaking years, as Ugandan long-distance star Joshua Cheptegei clocked to 12:35.36 to break the 5000m best for the first time since 2004.

 Karsten Warholm – Oslo 2021

Warholm had been closing in on the 400m hurdles world record for several seasons when he finally broke it with 46.70 on his home track in Oslo last summer. He went one better at the Olympic final in Tokyo a few weeks later, becoming the first hurdler ever to break the 46-second barrier.

Note: Three world records were also broken in non-Diamond League disciplines at the Wanda Diamond League exhibition event in Brussels in September 2020: Bashir Abdi in the 20,000m, and Mo Farah and Sifan Hassan in the One Hour.

Source: diamondleague.com

Berihu Aregawi breaks world 5Km Record

Ethiopia’s Berihu Aregawi ended the year in style as he broke the World 5k record at the at the Cursa dels Nassos event that was held on the New Year Eve (Dec 31) in Barcelona.

The 20 year-old had come within one second of Joshua Cheptegei’s world record in Lille last month, so was keen to take another crack at the mark before the year was out to ensure he could end 2021 on a high.

Aregawi won the Diamond League 5000m in Zurich in September, ran 12:49 to beat Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei’s world mark of 12:51 that he set in Monaco in February.

The 2018 Summer Youth Olympics 3000m silver medallist, ran much of the way by himself as he finished 41 seconds clear of Peter Maru of Uganda who came home in second place as Mike Foppen of Netherlands was third and Mehdi Belhadj and Yohan Durand of France fourth and fifth.

Joshua Cheptegei wins Fortebet Real Super Star of the Year Award

Joshua Cheptegei’s heroic victories at the Tokyo Olympics Games have earned him Fortebet Real Super Star of the year Award that was held at Spice Junction in Kololo.

Cheptegei who bagged Olympic gold and silver medals in the 5,000m and 10,000m respectively was announced the winner by Rev. Can Duncan Mugumya the commissioner of physical education and sports in the Ministry of Education and Sports says recognition of athletes motivates them.

“I want to thank the organisers for coming up with such an initiative. It really motivates the athletes. I myself was an athlete till the national level so don’t be surprised that I am a reverend but also involved in sports,” noted Mugumya.

Mugumya handed over the plaque to Abdullah Muhammad, representative of the coaches at Uganda Athletics Federation (UAF) on Cheptegei’s behalf.

“When he went to the Olympics, he really wanted to win since those are medals that missed in his cabinet. He won them in style. I hope this accolade will inspire more young stars to come,” stated Abdullah.

Cheptegei beat rally driver Yasin Nasser, golfer Irene Nakalembe and cricketer Riazat Shah Ali to the award.

The Uganda Police Force athlete had previously won three monthly Real Stars accolades.