Tag Archives: Jemima Sumgong

Kenya might be banned tomorrow by World Athletics

Kenya might be suspended from ALL Athletics activities tomorrow (Friday, 25) by the World Athletics (WA) and Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) due to that rampant doping cases that have engulfed the country this year by Kenyan runners.

Our source a senior official at Athletics Kenya, on condition of anonymity request told Athletics.co.ke, “From where I seat and the information am getting directly from AIU top officials, it’s a done case.” We are at their mercies as from now and we should prepare ourselves for the worse which is being suspended for a minimum of two years or a maximum of three years, so that we can put our house in order,” he said.

The senior official said that there are many top elite athletes that AIU is on their radar and soon they will be unmasked and this will be the end of their running careers.

“Many athletes and the country at large will be affected and it will be an expensive affair that will cost jobs and many lives will be affected directly and indirectly,” he said.

This year alone the country has had 17 athletes sanctioned by AIU for a range of doping violations with eight athletes currently on provisional suspensions, with the outcomes of their cases pending.

The newly appointed cabinet secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and the Arts, Ababu Namwamba, has been vocal on the intentions that government is going to take in the fight against the doping menace, “We are going to criminalise doping to levels you cannot imagine. We are going to be very, very harsh.

Ten Kenya athletes have tested positive since last year, for a banned substance called triamcinolone Acetonide, while two others from other nations tested positive for the same substance.

“It is a synthetic corticosteroid medication administered through injection into joints to treat various joint conditions. It is also used topically to treat various skin conditions, such as relieving the discomfort of mouth sores,” he said.

The late Athletics Kenya president Isaiah Kiplagat in 2015, suspended Rosa Associati management stable run by Dr. Gabrielle Rosa and Gerard Van de Veen of Volare Sports.

Athletes who have been banned at Rosa stable include, three-time Boston marathon winner Rita Jeptoo, two-time world champion Asbel Kiprop and the 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong while at Volare Sports include Wilson Kipsang.

The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) now World Athletics included the distance-running superpower on a list of nations most at risk of doping in July 2018.

It came as part of new regulations by the WA Council put more responsibility on National Federations to deal with the problem.

Kenya is among four countries included in Category A – member federations the World Athletics believe are most likely to have doping problems – along with Ethiopia, Belarus, hosts of next year’s European Games, and Ukraine.

Athletics Kenya staring a ban

Athletics Kenya, athletes and athletic fans will be waiting patiently when World Athletics (WA) and Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) will be making an announcement whether Kenya will be struck off from competing in international events next season due to rampant doping cases reported by Kenyan runners.

With alarming doping cases reported in the country with top brass athletes, from track to field and road running, the country may face suspension or a ban for a period of time in order to put their house in order.

Our source, on anonymity request told Athletics.co.ke said: “ From the look of things its just a matter of when, because where we are now is at a danger zone. We may be suspended by AIU this year and this week might be the much awaited announcement. We pray that we be given time because of the efforts we and the Govrnment have put in to fight this menance,” he said.

He said that there are many top elite athletes that AIU is on their radar and soon they will be unmasked and this will be the end of their running careers.

“Many athletes and the country at large will be affected and it will be an expensive affair that will cost jobs and many lives will be affected directly and indirectly,” he said.

This year alone the country has had 17 athletes sanctioned by AIU for a range of doping violations with eight athletes currently on provisional suspensions, with the outcomes of their cases pending.

The newly appointed cabinet secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and the Arts, Ababu Namwamba, has been vocal on the intentions that government is going to take in the fight against the doping menace, “We are going to criminalise doping to levels you cannot imagine. We are going to be very, very harsh.

Ten Kenya athletes have tested positive since last year, for a banned substance called triamcinolone Acetonide, while two others from other nations tested positive for the same substance.

“It is a synthetic corticosteroid medication administered through injection into joints to treat various joint conditions. It is also used topically to treat various skin conditions, such as relieving the discomfort of mouth sores,” he said.

Senate majority leader Aron Cheruiyot is proposing a stringent measure to curb doping menace in the country to ensure that Kenyans run clean and regain the global reputation the country has been enjoying.

“Doping is one of the biggest issues that the new CS has to deal with, the fact that we reach a point where all our athletes will be screened more thoroughly than anybody else in the world. It is very terrible because it means that the glory that Kenya has enjoyed will be put in question and doubt because the world will see us as good at doping. That is really unfortunate,” said Cheruiyot.

The late Athletics Kenya president Isaiah Kiplagat in 2015, suspended Rosa Associati management stable run by Dr. Gabrielle Rosa and Gerard Van de Veen of Volare Sports.

Athletes who have been banned at Rosa stable include, three-time Boston marathon winner Rita Jeptoo, two-time world champion Asbel Kiprop and the 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong while at Volare Sports include Wilson Kipsang.

He said that the CS should also take on the agents in the country who are misleading young athletes by trying to show them the easier way into the global stage yet it is known that there are no easier routes to success and one has to sweat it out.
“As a country, we must re-register afresh these agents. Those that have been found to have athletes that have doped must be banned from this country because those are the people responsible for the mess that we find ourselves in,” he said.

Samuel Kalalei banned for four year for doping

The Athletics Integrity Unit has has banned the reigning Athens Marathon champion Samuel Kalalei for four years after testing positive for blood-booster EPO.

Kalalei’s urine sample, which was collected after the Rotterdam Marathon in April, had returned positive for EPO.

The 23-year-old was provisionally suspended by AIU, the independent agency of world athletics ruling body IAAF, on June 4.

The AIU said that all of Kalalei’s results since that event in the Netherlands would now stand disqualified. Kalalei had set a personal best time of two hours 10 minutes and 44 seconds to finish in seventh place.

Kalalei is the third Kenyan athlete to receive a doping ban this year while four further cases are still pending.

They include former Olympic 1500m gold medallist and three-time world champion Asbel Kiprop, who was found to have traces of EPO after a test in November 2017.

In the same month, Rio 2016 Olympic women’s marathon gold medallist Jemima Sumgong received a four-year ban.

In September, the World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada) said Kenya had a “serious problem” with doping.

A Wada report said that between 2004 and 2018, more than 138 athletes from the east African nation have tested positive for prohibited substances, 113 of them during competitions.

Asbel Kiprop should expect just judgment, says AIU Boss

Three times world 1500m champion, Asbel Kiprop’s doping case is expected to conclude with a fair judgment as his case has been referred to the DT. The head of the Athletics Integrity Unit spoke exclusively to Athletics News on various issues touching on doping in the country and globally.

Brett Clothier the head of Athletics Integrity Unit said that although there was no evidence of institutionalized doping in the country, it was still case for serious concern. He also mentioned on Kiprop that although the case is still under review by judges handling the case, AIU was determined to give him a fair hearing and conclusive judgment.

This comes in the wake of Kiprop insisting that the process to take samples from him was marred by irregularities starting with the anti-doping agents calling him prior to testing him which goes against their own internal regulations.

Secondly accusations of extortion from one of the officials have further tainted the whole process since it attacks the integrity of AIU as it goes about its global policing effort of curbing doping amongst athletes.

In May the AIU rejected claims his sample was tampered with and that testers had asked him for money.

‘I could trust them’ – what happened?

Kiprop was tested on 27 November 2017 in Iten, Kenya, having been told the previous night that doping control officers would be visiting.

Although that is against protocol, Kiprop said he did not take it as “something serious” because it had happened before.

The AIU said Kiprop’s sample was not tampered with but said it is “extremely disappointing” he was given advance notice of the test.

In response to Brett, Asbel said, “If at all I earn justice. I’m going to make the best out of my career. I have always not taken things so serious neither bring myself together to realize my full potential. But here I have learned that everything we do we gotta take every step as it counts because in every profession anything can happen anytime. If I earn justice. I will bring all my act together in order to realize my full potential. It will take me over another season to train and get a stable foundation but I believe I will be there. All I pray is to earn justice”.

Kiprop’s failed test dealt another damaging blow to Kenya’s reputation as a middle and long-distance running superpower. Dozens of Kenyans have tested positive for an array of doping substances in recent years. They’ve included big names, among them Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong, Rita Jeptoo, Matthew Kisorio,Agatha Jeruto and Lucy Kabuu.

Sumgong and Jeptoo tested positive for EPO and were banned for four years. Kisorio and Jeruto tested positive for traces of steroids and were banned for two and four years, respectively.

 

Kipyegon Bett tests positive for EPO

world 800m bronze medallist, Kipyegon Bett has tested positive for banned blood booster Erythropoeitin (EPO), Athletics Kenya officials said on Friday.

Athletics Kenya Executive member Barnabas Korir, said they had received notification from the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) on Thursday that the 20-year-old had submitted a positive sample.

The AIU handles integrity and doping issues for the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

Should Bett’s B sample match his A sample, he will face a ban from the sport. He is already serving a provisional suspension for failing to submit to sample collection on August 15th.

“We had submitted defence for the case of ‘refusing or failing to submit to sample collection’ by today’s deadline. But last night, we received another notification about the new (EPO) case,” Korir explained.

“We have kicked off due process, accorded to every athlete as per the rules set by AIU. If the second test confirms the first one, then the athlete will have to face full consequences of the (anti-doping) law,” he said.

If his positive test is confirmed, Bett will join a growing list of Kenyan athletes to have flouted anti-doping rules. Milan Marathon winner Lucy Kabuu tested positive for morphine earlier this month. Samuel Kalalei, winner of Athens Marathon last November, also tested positive for EPO on June 4th.

Kenyan-born Bahraini runner Ruth Jebet, the 2016 Rio Olympic 3,000m steeplechase champion, and former Olympic and three-times world 1,500m champion, Asbel Kiprop, were suspended after their samples tested positive for EPO in February.

Other previous high profile Kenyan athletes who failed dope tests are 2016 Olympics marathon winner Jemima Sumgong and former Boston Marathon winner Rita Jeptoo.

 

 

WHO IS PROTECTING DR. GABRIELE ROSA?

Another soldier down is a common phrase among soldiers in combat use when one of them falls in battle.

This phrase aptly captures the recent doping cases involving Lucy Kabuu. Their case have one common denominator, they both hail from the Rosa and Associati camp.

One year ago we covered Dr. Gabriele Rosa in an expose detailing how his camp had over the years produced champions as well as the highest number of athletes found to have used enhancing drugs. The recent cases of Kabuu who joined Rosa’s camp in January tested positive for narcotic morphine in April. Until then, Kabuu had been an athlete competing honestly for over 15 years without any involvement with banned substances. It is not wrong to assume that her positive test can be linked to her joining the camp.

Hon. Wesley Korir former Boston Marathon champion had this to say about the latest doping scandal involving Lucy Kabuu from the Rosa camp, “I will be vindicated one day when I say that the biggest problem in Kenya doping menace is Rosa and associates and the only way to truly fight doping in Kenyans is to ban this agency from representing Kenyans. Ask when did Kabuu join this agency and immediately she is doping?

So the question to be answered is who is protecting Dr. Rosa? Why is this camp so important to Kenya despite the negative image it has painted of Kenya, a country that has been known as an athletics powerhouse but now every win is being questioned by the world?

Some of the high level names include Rita Jeptoo, Jemima Sumgong, Mathew Kisorio and Agatha Jeruto. The most recent high level athlete has been Asbel Kiprop. The coach under who these names were found to test positive for banned substances was Claudio Beraddelli.

In 2015 Athletics Kenya banned Rosa Associati and Volare Sports for six months as they investigated their roles in doping cases but were later lifted under unclear circumstances by AK.

Many questions arises about this man Dr. Rosa, how powerful is he that he manages to get his way through this doping issues? Has Athletics Kenya shielded the alleged peddlers of doping in Kenya, Rossa Associati, for a long time? Does Dr. Rosa fund Athletics Kenya? Does he have insiders at the IAAF that shield him and his athletes?

According to his website (www.rosassociati.it) the stable has 69 and 35 top notch athletes from around the world. The stable has names like Nijel Amos, Asbel Kiprop, Lonyangata Paul,Stanley Biwott,Lilesa Feyisa Gemeche,Belay Tigist Gashaw,Getent Tigest Mekonen,Yalew Genet and Jemima Sumgong just to name the few.

He has one of the biggest athletes stable in the world with the biggest names in athletics world from the likes of former world record holder and Kenya’s legend Paul Tergat to the current crop of emerging runners the likes of Tuei Sandrafelis Chebet a junior champion.

Kenya wants no discrimination in new IAAF anti-doping rules

Doping is a global menace and there should be no discrimination in the tough new anti-doping rules announced by the sport’s governing IAAF at its council meeting in Buenos Aires last week, a senior Kenyan athletics official said on Monday.

Under the rules approved by the International Association of Athletics Federations, Kenyan athletes will be among those required to have at least three out-of-competition doping tests in the 10 months before a world championships or Olympics.

“The rigorous dope testing Kenyan athletes will be subjected to be a necessary evil to safeguard the interest of the majority of those who overwhelmingly run clean,” Barnabas Korir, a member of Athletics Kenya’s (AK) Executive Committee, told Reuters.

“It’s however our belief this is done with the assurance that doping is a global menace and has to be fought as such without discrimination. AK will cooperate fully to fulfill its objectives and help reduce and eventually eliminate this vice.”

Up to 50 Kenyan athletes have failed dope tests in the past six years, among them 2016 Rio Olympics marathon champion Jemima Sumgong and former Olympic and three-time world 1,500m champion Asbel Kiprop, who has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing.

Kiprop’s case is with the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU), an independent body that manages all doping-related matters, which is due to hold a hearing in London next month.

Under the new anti-doping rules announced on Friday, the IAAF has divided its member federations into three categories which will have different obligations based on their success in athletics and the perceived risk of doping.

Kenya is in Category A along with eastern African rivals Ethiopia, Belarus and Ukraine, who were described by the IAAF as “member federations majorly at risk of doping.”

Previously, obligations under the anti-doping code were focused mainly on individuals rather than member federations.

The AIU recommended the new regulations to the IAAF as a crucial step in protecting the integrity of the sport.

The power to categorise members into one of the three groups will rest with the AIU board and the new rules will come into effect from 2019, a year before the Tokyo Olympics.

The AIU replaced the IAAF’s anti-doping department in April last year and handles aspects including testing, intelligence and investigations related to misconduct within the sport.

Asbel Kiprop acknowledges failed drug test

Former Olympic 1,500m champion Asbel Kiprop says he has tested positive for doping and is alleging officials who collected his drug-test sample extorted money from him.

Kiprop wired funds to one of the doping control officers by mobile phone while they were still in his house in Iten, Kenya, collecting his urine sample last November, he said in a statement released via his lawyer Thursday.

The 2008 Olympic gold medalist and three-time world champion said he learned in February the sample tested positive.

“I remain perplexed on how my innocent sample could turn positive on the only time when money was extorted from me,” Kiprop said. “It is not beyond my suspicion that my sample turned positive because I might have remitted less money than I was expected to remit.”

News of a failed test for Kiprop was first reported Wednesday by the Daily Mail. The IAAF anti-doping unit would not comment on Thursday on the report.

Kiprop’s statement did not specify what substance he tested positive for. However, he appeared to suggest it might be the banned blood-boosting hormone EPO, saying: “I am told EPO is put into the body using injection. The last time I had an injection was in 2014 when I was given a yellow fever vaccination before travelling to Bahamas for a competition.”

Kiprop’s failed test deals another damaging blow to Kenya’s reputation as a middle and long-distance running superpower. Dozens of Kenyans have tested positive for an array of doping substances in recent years. They’ve included big names, among them Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong. Like four other elite Kenyan runners who also failed doping tests, Kiprop worked with Italian agent Federico Rosa. The other four are Sumgong, Rita Jeptoo, Matthew Kisorio and Agatha Jeruto.

Sumgong and Jeptoo tested positive for EPO and were banned for four years. Kisorio and Jeruto tested positive for traces of steroids and were banned for two and four years, respectively.

Rosa said he was “shocked” by the news of Kiprop’s failed test.

“It is very, very strange to me after so many years of such an incredible career,” Rosa told The Associated Press in a phone interview.

Rosa said he was travelling when the story broke and that he has since been trying unsuccessfully to speak to his athlete.

http://kwese.espn.com

Asbel Kiprop denies doping claims

Asbel Kiprop, the former Olympic and three-time 1500m world champion, has insisted he is a “clean athlete” after reports emerged that he had failed a drugs test.

Rumours have swirled within the sport for some time that a prominent Kenyan athlete had become the latest in a growing list of the nation’s runners to fail drugs tests.

Kenyan newspaper The Standard confirmed on Wednesday morning that a Kenyan runner who had “dominated World Championships over the years” had tested positive for the performance enhancing drug erythropoietin (EPO) in an out-of-competition test.

Neither the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya nor Athletics Kenya have confirmed the identity of the athlete, but numerous reports named Kiprop.

“I have read the reports linking me to doping,” Kiprop told the Guardian. “As an athlete, I have been at the forefront of the fight against doping in Kenya, a fight I strongly believe in and support.

“I would not want to ruin all what I have worked for since my first international race in 2007. I hope I can prove that I am a clean athlete in every way possible.”

Kiprop won his first global title at the 2008 Beijing Olympics before completing a hat-trick of World Championship triumphs in 2011, 2013 and 2015. Expected to challenge for a fourth world title in London last summer, Kiprop faded to finish ninth in the Olympic Stadium.

Kenyan athletics has been embroiled in an increasing number of doping cases, with more than 40 athletes failing drugs tests over the past five years.

The country was declared “non-compliant” with global anti-doping regulations prior to the Rio 2016 Olympics and IAAF president Seb Coe confirmed Kenya remained on the watch-list of the Athletics Integrity Unit last November due to its number of anti-doping violations and allegations of financial impropriety among leading figures within the country’s athletics governing body.

Rio 2016 Olympic marathon champion Jemima Sumgong had been the highest profile Kenyan to fail a drugs test when she was handed a four-year ban last year after also testing positive for EPO – her second doping violation after she had tested positive for prednisone in 2012.

Sumgong’s ban followed that of another prominent marathon runner Rita Jeptoo, who was also banned for four years after testing positive for EPO.

telegraph.co.uk

Asbel Kiprop fails doping test

Olympic and three times 1500m world champion Asbel Kiprop has reportedly tested positive for a banned substance.

The Kenyan, who 10 years ago beat Kiwi silver medallist Nick Willis at the Beijing Olympics, is widely regarded as the finest 1500m runner of the last decade.

Kiprop’s agent, Federico Rosa, said he was aware of the rumour but was “still trying to get confirmation”, when contacted by The Daily Mail.

However, senior athletics sources have confirmed the 28-year-old failed an out of competition test.

A report in Kenya on Tuesday said a high profile runner who has “dominated world championships over the years” was embroiled in a doping scandal.

It also claimed, while there was no confirmation from the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (Adak) or Athletics Kenya (AK), that the substance was the same blood-boosting drug used by disgraced Kenyan Jemima Sumgong.

Sumgong, who won the women’s marathon at the Rio Olympics, last year tested positive for EPO and was subsequently banned for four years.

Kenya has been stung by a rash of positive tests in recent years. Between 2012 and 2016, 40 cases were reported, including marathon gun Rita Jeptoo.

Rosa said he was fearful Kiprop had indeed tested positive.

“I recognise it’s a big story, but if it’s true it will be very sad,” he said.

Kiprop, who won his last 1500m world title in 2015, shot to prominence as a 19-year-old, when he was narrowly beaten by Rashid Ramzi at the Beijing Olympics.

However, the Bahraini runner tested positive for a modern EPO and Kiprop and Willis moved up the podium.

Kiprop has competed in the opening Diamond League event of the season, in Doha, every year since 2010, but is not listed to compete on Saturday