Tag Archives: Hellen Obiri

Pamela Jelimo receives her Olympic medal after waiting for 10 years

The first Kenyan woman to win an Olympic gold medal in the 800m women race, Pamela Jelimo, yesterday received her bronze medal that was presented to her at the historic pillars of the Kenyan heritage building.

The 2008 Africa 800m and 2012 World Indoor 800m champion, who finished fourth in 1:57.59 was emotional as she received her award,

The ceremony which was graced by Cabinet Secretary for Youth Affairs, Sports and Arts Ababu Namwamba, NOC_K president, Dr. Paul Tergat and International Olympic Committee (IOC) member Kipchoge Keino, IOC Olympic Solidarity Pamela Vipond and Gonzalo Barrio who are currently in the country to hold consultative meetings with NOC-K.

Three athletes so far have received an upgrade of their performance in the 2012 London Games, a result of winner Mariya Savinova from Russia, who was stripped of the gold medal for doping.

“My children can now watch me receive the bronze medal, 10 years later. This is like a dream; I initially didn’t believe it when I heard the good news. It’s truly a dream of every athlete to win a medal in the Olympics and I’m honored to have my parents accompany me and share this joy.” She said.

Following this, South Africa’s Caster Semenya and another Russian Ekaterina Poistogova, who had settled for silver and bronze moved to Gold and silver respectively.

This resulted in “Eldoret express”, World Champion in the race, Janeth Jepkosgei moving into 8th position and receiving an IOC Diploma certificate.

The third athlete to receive a certificate is 5,000 Olympic Silver medalist Hellen Obiri who scooped 8th position in the London Olympics.

“I remember 2012, since it was my first Olympics, my expectations were high honestly, however I didn’t sniff the medal bracket. So humbled to receive the upgrade and this is a motivation to fellow athletes to run clean.” She said.

On receiving this, the New York Marathon debutant told the NOC-K she’s liking her new career in Marathon and exclusively reported she will indeed be going for the Paris 2024 Marathon to ensure an Olympic Gold medal (the only medal she’s missing) is in her cabinet.

“Inspire a Generation.’’ Was the motto for the 2012 London Olympic Games, and indeed the first Kenyan woman to win an Olympic gold medal in the 800m women race, Pamela Jelimo, has proven the theme as she received her bronze medal in her home country surrounded by the Olympic family under the historic pillars of the Kenyan heritage building.

 

Sharon Lokedi wins New York City Marathon

Newcomer Sharon Lokedi from Kenya was the surprise winner at the 50th edition of the TCS New York City Marathon, a World Athletics Platinum Race and a World Marathon Major competition held on Sunday (06) in New York.

Lokedi who is a fiance to the17-time NCAA champion collegiate distance runner for the University of Oregon, Edward Cheserek, became the 8th person in New York City marathon history, man or woman, to win in her marathon debut in a personal best of 2:23.23.

The 28 year-old was followed by the World bronze medallist, Kenyan-born Israeli Lonah Chemtai Salpeter who crossed the line in second in 2:23.30 with the reigning World marathon champion Gotytom Gebrselase from Ethiopia coming home in third place in 2:23.39.

When Lokedi was 14, her family fled their home village of Burnt Forest that became an area of violence after a Kenyan presidential election. For a month, the family lived with no shelter or a steady source of food before returning after the conflict ended.

Two times World Marathon champion Edna Ngeringwony Kiplagat came home in fourth with Viola Cheptoo who finished behind Olympic champion Peres Jepchirchir on her marathon debut in the American city last year crossing the line in fifth in 2:25.34.

Double World 5000m champion Hellen Obiri who was also making her marathon debut finished in sixth place with a personal best of  2:25.49 with former Kenyan now trading for United States Aliphine Tuliamuk finishing in seventh place in 2:26.18.

Viola Lagat aims to honour the late Agnes Tirop

Kenyan marathon runner Viola Cheptoo Lagat says she will be driven by the desire to win for murdered compatriot Agnes Tirop during Sunday’s New York Marathon.

Lagat finished behind Olympic champion Peres Jepchirchir on her marathon debut in the American city last year before dedicating her silver medal to Tirop, who was found dead at her house three weeks prior to the event.

But the 33-year-old is determined to go one better at this year’s famed five-borough race as she aims to honour Tirop.

“I’m going to work hard to win for her this time,” Lagat told BBC Sport Africa.

“My mind is in a good place and I’ve got really good training in this time around. I feel stronger and I know the field is also strong, but I know the spirit of Agnes is still going to fight with me like last time.

“I don’t want to let anyone down, especially the spirit of Agnes that has fought with us from the beginning.

“It’s going to be a tough field, but I’m going in feeling strong and I hope most of my hard work in the last few months is going to take me through.”

Lagat clocked two hours 22 minutes and 44 seconds in New York last November – which remains her personal best marathon time – crossing the line five seconds behind winner Jepchirchir.

Lagat faces competition from fellow New York Marathon medallists Ababel Yeshaneh and Peres Jepchirchir

She was one minute and three seconds slower as she finished sixth in the Boston Marathon in April this year, but is expecting another fast race in the ‘Big Apple’ this weekend.

Tirop’s Angels

Tirop finished fourth in the 5,000m at the Tokyo Olympics in August last year and Lagat was with her a few weeks later when she smashed the women’s-only 10km world record in Germany, crossing the line in 30 minutes and one second.

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Hellen Obiri to battle Gotytom Gebrselase and Ednah Kiplagat in New York

Doubel world 5000m champion Hellen Obiri, will battle World marathon champion Gotytom Gebrselase at the 50th edition of the TCS New York City Marathon, a World Athletics Platinum Race and a World Marathon Major competition that will be held on Sunday (06) in New York.

Gebrselase comes to this race with second fastest time on paper of 2:18.11 that she got at 2022 World Athletics Championships where she broke the championship record. Gebrselase also took the honors at 2021 Berlin Marathon in a time of 2:20.09 and was also third at the Tokyo Marathon where she ran her second fastest time of 2:18.18.

“Winning the World Championships was like a dream. I am honored to run my next marathon in New York. Its home to the biggest marathon in the world, and many athletes have run there. I understand it’s a challenging course, and I am looking forward to seeing further success there,” said Gebrselase.

The 27 year-old will face off with Obiri who will be making her marathon debut in New York. The Kenyan won two Olympic silver medals in Rio de Janeiro in 2016 and Tokyo 2021, and the world Cross Country title in Ahrus in 2019. The 32 year-old also won the world silver medal in 10000m in Eugene last July. On the road, Obiri finished second when setting personal best of 1:04.22 at the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon and won two half marathon races in Istanbul in 1:04.48 and at the Great North Run in Newcastle in 1:07.05. Over shorter road distances, she won the 10 km Great Manchester Run. Obiri moved from Ngong to Boulder to start training with three-time Olympian Dathan Ritzenheim and the two-time world marathon champion Edna Kiplagat, who live in Boulder,Colorado.

“Everyone has been welcoming, and the training environment is perfect. Training is very similar in Kenya. The biggest challenge has been being away from my family, as I miss them a lot. I have often watched the New York race on TV and seen my Kenyan colleagues compete there. I know that New York is a tough course, but I hope my experience on the track, cross country and the roads will help me navigate the ups and downs,” said Obiri.

Another title contender is Kiplagat who holds three World Marathon races in New York in 2010, London in 2014, and Boston in 2017. The 42-year-old finished fourth at the 2022 Boston Marathon with a time of 2:21.40 smashing her own personal best of 2:19.50 that she got at the 2012 London marathon.

The 2020 Tokyo Marathon winner, Kenyan-born Israeli Lonah Chemtai Salpeter comes to this race with the fastest time on paper of 2:17.45. Salpeter won the bronze medal in Eugen with a time of 2:20.18. On the track, Salpeter won the gold medal in the 10000m at the2018  European Championships in Berlin and the European bronze medal over the same distance in Munich 2022. Salpeter hopes that the world bronze medal in Eugene will be a springboard for a top-three finish in her debut at the New York Marathon.

“It has been my dream to compete at the New York Marathon for a long time. I am just looking to try and achieve another podium,” said Salpeter.

The 2015 world 5000m silver medallist, Senbere Teferi will be looking to become the first Ethiopian to win the New York Half Marathon, the New York Mini 10 km, and the TCS New York Marathon in the same year.

Another top athlete to watch is Viola Cheptoo, who finished second in New York last year in a time of 2:22.44. The 33 year-old is the younger sister to former 1500m and 5000m world champion Bernard Lagat, also finished sixth at the Boston Marathon in 2:23.47 and won the Naples Half Marathon in 1:06:47 in 2020.

Newcomer Sharon Lokedi from Kenya will return to New York, where she set her personal best in half marathon of 1:08.14 last March.

United States Marathon National record holder Keira D’Amato, will carry the hopes of her country as she comes to this race with a personal best of 2:19.12 that she got in January in Houston.

The line-up also features Emma Bates who was second in Chicago in 2021 with a time of 2:24.20 and seventh at the World Championships in Eugene where she got her personal best of 2:23.18.

The 2019 Rotterdam bronze medallist United States Aliphine Tuliamuk will also be on start line up as she comes to this race with a personal best of 2:26.50.

LEADING TIME

42KM WOMEN

ATHLETE AGE COUNTRY MARATHON PR
LONAH CHEMTAI SALPETER  33 ISR 2:17:45
GOTYTOM GEBRESLASE  27 ETH 2:18:11
KEIRA D’AMATO  38 USA 2:19:12
EDNA KIPLAGAT  42 KEN 2:19:50
DES LINDEN  39 USA 2:22:28
MAO UESUGI  26 JPN 2:22:29
VIOLA CHEPTOO  33 KEN 2:22:44
EMMA BATES  30 USA 2:23:18
CAROLINE ROTICH  38 KEN 2:23:22
SENBERE TEFERI  27 ETH 2:24:11
LINDSAY FLANAGAN  31 USA 2:24:35
DAKOTAH LINDWURM  27 USA 2:25:01
ELOISE WELLINGS  39 AUS 2:25:10
JESSICA STENSON  35 AUS 2:25:15
GERDA STEYN  32 RSA 2:25:28
NELL ROJAS  34 USA 2:25:57
ANNIE FRISBIE  25 USA 2:26:18
ALIPHINE TULIAMUK  33 USA 2:26:50
STEPHANIE BRUCE  38 USA 2:27:47
ROBERTA GRONER  44 USA 2:29:09
MOLLY GRABILL  29 USA 2:29:17
RUTH VAN DER MEIJDEN  37 NED 2:29:30
MAEGAN KRIFCHIN  34 USA 2:30:17
MOLLY (CULVER) ROBERTS  31 USA 2:30:20
GRACE KAHURA  29 KEN 2:30:32
SARAH PAGANO  31 USA 2:33:11
KAYLA LAMPE  29 USA 2:38:25
EMILY DURGIN  28 USA DEBUT
SHARON LOKEDI  28 KEN DEBUT
HELLEN OBIRI  32 KEN DEBUT

 

Almaz Ayana and Genzebe Dibaba to make their Marathon Debut

The 2016 Olympic 10,000m champion Almaz Ayana and the world 1500m record holder Genzebe Dibaba will be making their historical move to marathon at the 47th edition of the Amsterdam Marathon that will be held on October 16, 2022.

The 30 year-old smashed the 10,000m record at the Rio Olympics Games in a time of 29:17.45 erasing the old record of the 23 year-old record by 14 seconds that had been set by Wang Junxia from China. The record lasted for five years and was broken by Dutch superstar Sifan Hassan to 29:06.82 which lasted for only two days as it was lowered by her compatriot Letensebet Gidey at the Ethiopian trials on the same track with a time of 29:01.03.

The two times world 5000m and 10,000m champion, Ayana returned to the game after taking a sabbatical leave of nearly three years and made a huge announcement at the Great North Run where she finished in third place behind the double world 5000m champion, Hellen Obiri who will also be making her marathon debut in New York this year.

The 31 year-old, Dibaba, will follow her older sisters and fellow Olympic medalists Tirunesh and Ejegayehu into the marathon. Dibaba still holds 1500m world record of 3:50.07 that she set in 2015, though Faith Kipyegon threaten the record this year when she fell short of the record with 31 seconds as she set the second-fastest time in history of 3:50.37 last month in  Monaco.

Dibaba who missed the 2019 World Championships with a right foot injury and Tokyo Olympics, ran the then-fastest debut half marathon for a woman of 1:05.18 in Valencia in 2020. The five time world Indoor champion ran the Dubai half marathon early this year but she dropped out due to fatigue.

Hellen Obiri beats Peres Jepchirchir by a whisker in England

Double World 5000m champion, Hellen Obiri narrowly beat the Olympic marathon champion Peres Jepchirchir at the 41st edition of the Great North Run that will be held on Sunday (11) from Newcastle to South Shields in England.

Obiri who defeated Commonwealth Games 10,000m champion Eilish McColgan in last year’s edition was pushed to the tape by Jepchirchir who is the two-time world half marathon champion and also the women-only half marathon world record-holder of 1:05.16. This year ‘s victory was decided by just two seconds with the latter taking the honors in one of the bruising battle ever seen in Shields.

Obiri’s winning time of 1:07.05 was a minute and a half behind the Great North Run’s current women’s record holder Mary Keitany, also from Kenya.

Jepchirchir who came to this race as the second fastest runner after the winner settled in second in 1:07.07.

The former Olympic 5000m and 10,000m champion Almaz Ayana from Ethiopia, who is making her come back after taking sabbatical leave, announced her return on the road with a third place finish in a time of 1:07.10

The 2012 World Junior women’s 3000m Champion, Hiwot Gebrekidan from Ethiopia came home in fourth place  in 1:07.22 with Four times European Cross Country Champion, Charlotte Purdue who also finished in third place last year, relegated to fifth in 1:10.11.

LEADING RESULTS

21KM WOMEN

  1. Hellen Obiri             (KEN) 1:07.05
  2. Peres Jepchirchir     (KEN) 1:07.07
  3. Almaz Ayana            (ETH) 1:07.10
  4. Hiwot Gebrekidan   (ETH) 1:07.22
  5. Charlotte Purdue     (BRT) 1:10.11

Hellen Obiri to clash with Peres Jepchirchir at the Great North Run

Double world 5000m champion, Hellen Obiri will clash with the Tokyo Olympic marathon champion, Peres Jepchirchir at the 41st edition of the Great North Run that will be held on Sunday (11) from Newcastle to South Shields in England.

Obiri defeated Commonwealth Games 10,000m champion Eilish McColgan, who will be performing the role of official starter this weekend, will battle for honors with Jepchirchir who is the two-time world half marathon champion and also the women-only half marathon world record-holder of 1:05.16.

The 32 year-old who will be defending her title, comes to this race with a personal best of 1:04.51 which is fourteen seconds faster that Jepchirchir’s.

The two will face-off with former Olympic 5000m and 10,000m champion Almaz Ayana from Ethiopia, who is making her come back after taking sabbatical leave and her fellow compatriot Hiwot Gebrekidan, who is the 2012 World Junior women’s 3000m Champion.

The home team will be led by with Jess Piasecki who comes to the race with a personal best of 1:07.20 that she got early this year at the 30a Mitja Marató Internacional Vila de Santa Pola, where she took the silver.

Four times European Cross Country Champion, Charlotte Purdue who also finished in third place last year has also been lined up to fight for the title as well as the European Indoor 3000m champion Amy Eloise Markovc who will be making her debut over the distance.

The race Organisers confirm half marathon showpiece will proceed on Sunday, with tributes planned to The Queen. Organisers of the Great North Run have confirmed that the half marathon showpiece will go ahead this coming Sunday (September 11), albeit with changes being made to the planned weekend of running in the North East of England. With alterations being made to the sporting calendar, in light of the passing of Her Majesty The Queen, there had been doubts as to whether or not the event would proceed.

The Great North 5k, due to incorporate the inaugural UK Athletics 5km Championships and set to take place this evening (September 9), has been cancelled, while this year’s Mini and Junior Great North Run has been postponed.

Irene Cheptai quits track

Commonwealth Games 10,000m silver medalist Irene Chepet Cheptai has called it quit on track as she now shifts her focus on the running and marathons.

The 30 year-old is optimistic that after her track success, she will replicate the same on the road running and marathons as she aims to compete at the World marathon majors come next year.

The 2017 World Cross Country Champion said come September 3rd, she will be running in her third 10km race in Czech Republic following her silver medal in Birmingham.

“In 2019, I finished fourth but I want to improve on my position and timing when I compete at the Prague race,” said Cheptai.

In May this year Cheptai smashed the Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) World 10K Bengaluru course record of 31:19 that was set by the late Agnes Tirop in 2018, with a new course record and personal best of 30:35. In this race she beat double World 5000m champion, Hellen Obiri and the reigning Agnes Tirop Cross Country champion, Joyce Chepkemoi Tele.

Irene Cheptai smashes World 10K Bengaluru course record. Photo: Race Organisers.

“I have had good days on track and it is high time I venture into road running and marathons in future. Commonwealth Games was my last track event where I signed off on a high note with a silver medal at a global stage,” said Cheptai.

Cheptai finished in second place in July at the New York City Half marathon where finished second behind Ethiopia’s Senbere Teferi in a time of 1:07.37.

The 2008 world cross country junior silver medalist had improved in her medal following her seventh place finish at the Olympic Games in 10,000m.

“This race marks my official entry to the marathon now that my focus will be competing for podium positions in the distance. I have competed in many road races including the half marathons, 10km and 5km but I have never run a marathon. I want to start the marathon on a high note,” she concluded.

Peres Jepchirchir targets the New Marathon course record

Olympic marathon champion, Peres Jepchirchir will be targeting the race course record at the 50th edition of the New York City Marathon that will be held on November 06, 2022 in New York.

Jepchirchir became the first woman to win both the Tokyo marathon and New York in a span of four months said her main aim is to defend her title and also chase the course record which failed to achieve after finishing eight seconds off the mark.

The 28 year-old also added the Boston marathon title in April, cementing her status as the world’s top marathoner.

“My main aim is to defend my title but with focus on the course record which I missed last year,” said Jepchirchir.
While releasing the elite list on Wednesday, the race organisers also included last year’s runner-up, Viola Cheptoo of Kenya.

The race will also have three debutants, World marathon champion ,Gotytom Gebreslase from Ethiopia, World bronze medallist, Lonah Salpeter from Israel and Kenya’s Hellen Obiri.

Americans Des Linden, Sara Hall, Emma Bates, Aliphine Tuliamuk, Nell Rojas and Stephanie Bruce will also be on the start line up.

Caster Semenya on world track and field championships entry list

Caster Semenya, the two-time Olympic 800m champion who now races longer distances due to a rule capping testosterone levels in middle-distance events, is on the 5000m entry list for the world championships that start next week in Eugene, Oregon.

Neither Semenya’s team nor South Africa’s track and field federation has responded to a request for confirmation that she will race at worlds. The federation announced a roster last week that did not include Semenya.

Semenya’s last global meet was the 2017 World Championships, where she won a third world title in the 800m and took bronze in the 1500m.

In 2019, a World Athletics rule went into effect that capped athlete testosterone levels in women’s events from the 400m through the mile for athletes with differences of sexual development (DSD). World Athletics said that no female athletes would have a level above the cap — five nanomoles per liter — unless they had a DSD or a tumor.

Semenya made multiple unsuccessful appeals. Her latest, and perhaps last, to the European Court of Human Rights last year, has not been adjudicated.

Over the last three years, Semenya joined a soccer club, then returned to the track and moved down to the 200m and finally up to the 5000m.

She did not qualify for the Tokyo Olympics. Nor did she qualify outright for these world championships based on her best time this season and world ranking, missing the initial 42-runner cutoff by two spots in the world rankings (and by three ranking points out of more than 1,100).

Semenya moved up the qualifiers list when other higher-ranked runners did not enter worlds. That list included reigning world champion Hellen Obiri of Kenya, who is entered solely in the 10,000m.

Elsewhere, Dutchwoman Sifan Hassan entered the 1500m, 5000m and 10,000m but is expected to drop at least one of the events. Hassan won gold in the 5000m and 10,000m and bronze in the 1500m in Tokyo.

Bahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo, the two-time Olympic 400m champion, is entered in both the 200m and 400m, which overlap. Her agency said Friday that she plans to contest solely the 400m.

Many top Cuban athletes are not entered at worlds after reports of athletes leaving the national team.

Cubans not on the entry list include Juan Miguel Echevarria, the Olympic long jump silver medalist, the world’s top two men’s triple jumpers this year in Jordan Diaz Fortun and Andy Diaz and Reynier Mena, who on Sunday ran the world’s third-fastest 200m this year, bringing his personal best down from to 20.04 to 19.63.

Source: olympics.nbcsports.com