Tag Archives: Gold Coast

KINYAMAL PIPS CONSESLUS, MANANGOI FOR TOP AWARD

The Commonwealth Games 800m gold medaslist Wycliffe Kinyamal beat Olympic and World champion Conseslus Kipruto and Commonwealth Games gold medalist Elijah Manangoi for the StarTimes/Sports Journalists Association of Kenya (SJAK) Sports Personality of the month of April, 2018.

The 21 year old emerging middle distance runner who stunned the world during 2018 event in Gold Coast, Australia becomes the tenth recipient of the monthly award.

In the vote by a panel of Sports Journalists, Kinyamal shook off stiff competition posed fellow athletes who included Conseslus Kipruto who won the 3000 metres steeplechase gold medal at the 2018 Commonwealth Games in a new Games Record.

The two lap runner also fended off opposition from World champion and Commonwealth Games 1500 metres gold medallist Elijah Manangoi.

Other nominees for the April award were boxer Christine Ongare who won a bronze, Kenya’s only medal outside track and field at the 2018 Commonwealth Games  and rally driver Manvir Baryan who became the first non-local to win the Rally of South Africa.

Kinyamal helped Kenya reclaim the 800m Commonwealth Games title after World Record holder David Rudisha was beaten to second place during the 2014 edition in Glasgow, Scotland.

His gold medal was the first for Kenya in the 2018 Commonwealth games.

A gold medalist at the 2016 East African Junior Athletics Championships in Dar Es Salaam Tanzania where he made his first impact in the 800m regionally, Kinyamal  took home a 42-inch digital television set and KSh100, 000 courtesy of StarTimes.

The fast rising athlete is affiliated to Global Sports Communication and is based in Kaptagat Uasin Gishu County.

An excited Kinyamal said he was surprised by the accolade which is his first.

“This surprise is truly an inspiration as I progress with my athletics career. Glasgow was a good outing for Team Kenya and for me winning Kenya’s first gold medal at the 2018 Commonwealth Games. I hope to deliver more medals for Kenya. Thank you SJAK and StarTimes for this award.” An elated Kinyamal added.

Nyairera out to make amends as she battles Semenya and Niyosaba in Lausanne

Olympic 800m bronze medallist Margaret Nyairera is seeking to bounce back at the Lausanne Diamond League meeting tomorrow after failing to finish in Paris a week ago.

Nyairera has had a mixed season so far at the circuit, finishing sixth at the Prefontaine Classic in Oregon, where she posted 1:58.67 in her first outing.
Nyairera hopes to find her form ahead of the Africa Championships slated for Nigeria next month. “The Diamond league races will enable me find the right form ahead of the Africa Championship,” she added.
Nyairera, who bagged silver the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast last April, said the early start to the season has contributed to her struggles on track. “The season started early with the Commonwealth Games but I hope come the Africa even,  I will be in peak condition,” she added. World and Commonwealth Games champion Caster Semenya won the two-lap race in Paris in 1:54.25. Former world champion Eunice Sum will also be in contention in the Swiss city after finishing ninth in 1:59.25 in Paris.
The two Kenyans will face off with Olympic silver medallist Francine Niyonsaba of Burundi, who was second in Paris behind Semenya in 1:55.86. Others to look out for include Ajee Wilson of the United States, home favourite Selina Buchel, Lynsey Sharp of the United States and Alemu Habitam of Ethiopia.
Davis Kiplangat leads a formidable strong Kenyan contingent in the 5000 metres alongside Collins Cheboi, Vincent Letting, David Bett, Sylvester Kiprotich and Richard Kimunyan in the 12-lap race.
They face stern test from Ethiopia’s World champion Muktar Edris alongside Yomif Kekelecha and world Under-18 champion Selemon Barega in a competitive field that is expected to produce fireworks.
Winny Chebet will lead Kenya’s hunt in the 1,500 metres alongside Nelly Jepkosgei and Emiliy Cherotich. The trio will be up against Hassan Sifan (Netherlands), Meraf Bahta (Sweden), Laura Muir (Great Britain), Dawit Seyaum, Gudaf Tsegay (Ethiopia), Liden Hall (Australia) and Arafi Rababe (Morocco).

Kipruto sets sight on Shaheen’s record

Kenyan Conseslus Kipruto says he has set his sights on breaking the 14-year-old 3,000-metre steeplechase world record at the Monaco Diamond League meeting on July 20.

The record of 7 minutes 53.63 seconds was set in Brussels in September 2004 by Kenyan-born Qatari Saif Saeed Shaheen

Kipruto, the Olympic and world champion, who also won the Commonwealth Games title at the Gold Coast, Australia in April, said he was in the best-ever form and ready to attempt the world record.

“This year has been so good for me. It’s every athlete’s dream to stay injury-free and God has been good to me,” Kipruto said in Nairobi on Saturday.

“I have four more weeks to prepare for the World record attempt in Monaco. It will be great to bring the 3,000m steeplechaser record back to Kenya.”

Kipruto returned to the track for the first time since his victory in the Commonwealth Games when he won the national title at the Kenya athletics championships at Kasarani stadium on Saturday, and was included in the squad for the African championships in Asaba, Nigeria, in August.

It will be Kipruto’s first appearance in the continental championships, and the 23-year-old is relishing the opportunity of adding the African title to his rich collection.

“The African title is the only one missing in my cabinet,” he said adding that the championships in Nigeria were also important because the winners there will make the African team for the IAAF Intercontinental championships in Ostrava, Czech Republic, in September.

afp.com

Callum Hawkins to face Mo Farah on Monday at Vitality London 10,000m

CALLUM Hawkins will return to racing for the first time since collapsing whilst leading the Commonwealth Games marathon when he takes on Mo Farah over 10,000m at the Vitality London 10,000m this bank holiday Monday.

The 25-year-old, who was on course for victory when he fell over just a mile out from the finish line on a scorching day on the Gold Coast, has been training in Glasgow since and clearly feels he is ready to test his conditioning over the shorter distance in a high profile race which starts on the Mall and finishes in front of Buckingham Palace.

Hawkins ran a stand-alone 10km personal best time of 29 minutes and three seconds in the Netherlands in February. Farah’s 10km personal best is a rapid 27:44 which he ran on the London 10,000 course in 2010 and he will be going for his sixth victory in this event.

The four-time Olympic champion showed he remains in good shape following his third place at this year’s Virgin Money London Marathon by running 28:27 to win Great Manchester Run 10km last Sunday. In the women’s race, last year’s Vitality London 10,000m champion Jo Pavey, 44, has been added to an exciting field which also includes Scotland’s Steph Twell.

Beth Dobbin, meanwhile, hasn’t shelved her plans to move up to the 400m after shattering her personal best at 200m on her home track at Loughborough this weekend then admitted it hasn’t altered her plans to specialise in the 400m. The 23-year-old, whose dad hails from Dunfermline and mum Jean comes from Doncaster, works at the town’s university so perhaps it was unsurprising that her victory – one of nine Scottish event wins on the day – was well received.

Her time of 23.14 would have been comfortably within the qualifying standards for the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games, a marker which she missed by only a hundredth of a second.

“I missed out on the Commonwealth Games qualifying time for the 200m by 100ths of a second,” Beth said. “I recorded a PB of 23.31 at the British champs last year and I half thought they’d take me anyway. But they didn’t and I understood the selection process. I did do a couple of 400m runs and thought about the relay but, six years ago, my coach told me to get under 23 seconds and then move up to 400m .That is still the plan and it is on schedule. Next year I’ll move up to 400m.”

heraldscotland.com

Kipruto targets to break steeplechase world record

World and Olympic Games 3000m steeplechase king Conseslus Kipruto, will be targeting a win at this year’s Monaco Diamond League in May following his triumph at the concluded Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia.

After winning all world events, starting with gold medals from World Youth championships, world championships, Olympic Games and Commonwealth Games, Kipruto will be eyeing a world record in Monaco Diamond League.

With the IAAF meeting kicking off on 4th May in Doha, Qatar, Kipruto will on course for a world record on a course with Monaco having historical fastest course.

As he recovers from Commonwealth Games, Kipruto will skip Doha and train for water and barriers record when he kicks off the journey at Shanghai in 5,000m before tackling Eugene course.

“This year, I have to do something special in Monaco. As I make a debut on the course, I will be eyeing for world record. I have to concentrate in quality training ahead of the races” said Kipruto.

The world record has stayed for fourteen years since Kenyan neutralized Qatari international Saif Shaheen formerly Stephen Cherono broke Moses Kiptanui’s record to 7:53.63 since 2004.

Commenting on Gold Coast, where he won the only missing gold in his medal cabinet, Kipruto said “I confirm in Gold Coast that I was in top form. It was an easy race winning in 8.10.08. If I could have pushed more I think I would have run sub 7 but I want to improve on that in the next events.”

dailysport.co.ke

Hughes disqualified after winning 200m gold

On a dramatic night at the Carrara Stadium on the Gold Coast, it was a mixed night for the home nations, as England’s Zharnel Hughes was disqualified after initially winning gold in the men’s 200m final.

Winning the race after a strong bend, Hughes began to tie up on the home straight and as Trinidad and Tobago’s Jereem Richards began to chase him down, the two were involved in a clash of arms approaching the finish line as both men stumbled over the line.

With both men clocking 20.12, Hughes was initially awarded the gold medal but as replays showed Hughes impeded his competitor as they vied for the line, Hughes was subsequently penalised and disqualified for infringement.

Desperately for Hughes, The Anguillan-born athlete was already on his lap of honour when he was informed of the official’s swift decision to DQ him, as Hughes went off the track in search of answers. An appeal was lodged by Team England but was unsuccessful as the result stood.

Hughes’ loss however was Northern Ireland’s Leon Reid‘s gain being promoted from fourth place behind Canada’s Aaron Brown, with the athlete who has declared himself to compete for Ireland but is yet to receive his papers to compete, walking away with a surprise bronze.

source: britwatchsports.com

Jamaica Government hails Praught on historic Commonwealth Games victory

The Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange, has said heaped praise on Aisha Praught who won a historic gold medal for Jamaica in the women’s 3000 metres steeplechase at the Commonwealth Games in the Gold Coast, Australia.

Minister Grange said Praught’s “performance was inspirational and displayed guts and determination.”

Praught produced her stunner late, catching world U20 record holder Celliphine Chespol off the final hurdle of the women’s 3000m steeplechase to take a shock victory in 9:21.00.

According to the Minister, “when we consider that Jamaica had never won a Commonwealth medal in an event longer that 800 metres, and that Aisha defeated the favourite and second-fastest woman ever in the 3000 metres steeplechase, then we understand the magnitude and significance of this victory for her and for our country. Congratulations Aisha on a job well done.”

Minister Grange also congratulated Anastasia Le-Roy and Stephenie McPherson who took the silver and bronze medals respectively in the women’s 400 metres.

Sonia O’Sullivan: We need a new category in women’s athletics

I know some people find it hard to get excited about the Commonwealth Games, although try telling that to the Australians. Over six days in the swimming pool they produced a proper gold rush – 28 gold medals in all, and 73 of the total 150 medals won in the pool. Few other countries could even make a splash.

You start to wonder how it all could be so easy, then you realise there are so many events in swimming, the same swimmers often returning over and over again. At one stage I saw an Australian swimmer on the podium being presented with her medal, and a few minutes later she was lining up for the next event.

If it wasn’t for the fast times, even world records, you would wonder about the level of competition at the Commonwealth Games. Even with 71 nations or territories represented, if felt like a home championships for the Australians. The crowds and venues on the beautiful Gold Coast playing a part too.

That all changed when the track and field events began. Compared to the World championships and the Olympics, where over 200 countries are represented, the Commonwealth Games are just a small pocket of countries competing for glory. But does it really matter as long as the race is competitive and engages the audience?

Plenty of drama

The women’s 10,000 metres provided plenty of drama: no breakaways, the lead constantly changing, and eight athletes still fighting out for the medals over the final circuit.

That gold medal in the end went to the Ugandan athlete Stella Chesang, in 31:45.30. There really are no soft gold medals on the track and that is evident here across a number of events. The women’s 1,500m final was one of the most eagerly awaited races, usually one of the more unpredictable too. Only this time it had very little unpredictability over the winner, and it was up to the rest of the field to try to change the script.

Seb Coe: Jake Wightman can double up like me

SEB Coe knows a thing or two about doubling up in the 800m and 1500m at a major championships. But even he knows there are no foolproof plans when it comes to the sharp end of middle-distance racing.

No sooner had the IAAF President passed on his advice to Scotland’s Jake Wightman ahead of tonight’s Commonwealth 800m final at the Carrara Stadium than the politician in him was inserting the small print.

“. . . But what do I know,” he said. “I’ve stuffed up a few 800 metres in my time.”

While he too has more pedigree in the 1500m, Wightman is doing well enough in 800m all by himself. Racing in the slowest, final heat, he put on the after burners to claim the second automatic qualifying spot in this lunchtime’s final, where he hopes to battle Botswana’s Nijel Amos, Australia’s Luke Matthews and a couple of handy Kenyans for a medal.

False modesty aside though, Coe – who took gold in the 1500m and silver in the 800m at both the 1980 and 1984 Olympics – is in touch with Wightman often enough that the two men should perhaps consider setting up a

Whatsapp group.

A friend of his dad Geoff’s from their running days, Jake is a real student of the sport who grew up immersed in the Coe legend via his parents. He was delighted to receive a hand-written letter of congratulations from him after he became the first

British male winner of a Diamond League in the 1500m at last year’s Bislett Games in Oslo and there was even a comic exchange between the two when Wightman mistakenly thought that a text from the IAAF President was actually from an old university pal who was also called Seb.

For the record, the track legend’s advice to Wightman ahead of tonight’s Commonwealth 800m final is simple enough to be verging on the bleeding obvious.

Don’t get boxed in. And be prepared to think outside the box if things aren’t going the way you hoped they would.

“What is my advice to him?” said Coe. “Back his own instincts. Back his own judgment. It’s very difficult for someone sitting in the stands to make that judgment.

“But the golden rule in all these things is to focus all the time and keep your wits about you,” he added. “The number one rule, particularly in 800 because things happen really quickly, is always to have an exit strategy – just in case someone does something silly in front of you.

“If they do, does that leave you on the inside momentarily where the race has got away from you? So if in doubt always run clear and just don’t get caught on the inside.”

If the likes of Wightman are bringing the 800/1500 double back into fashion, Coe doesn’t see why it shouldn’t be achievable – even if the dynamics over racing over the shorter distance appear to be changing.

Where successful runners like himself would often leave their burst till the latter stages of a race, now

exponents often step on the gas from the outset. At least Wightman had the day off yesterday after a round of the 800m was dropped due to a lack of entrants.

“It is tough to double up,” said Coe of Wightman, the sole Scot surviving in this event after the elimination of

Guy Learmonth.

“He hasn’t doubled up that often before. The only observation I made was, as I found in LA when I doubled up and on other occasions, that getting some good 800 metres under your belt actually left you in good shape.

He’s a well-conditioned athlete so

actually, given his background as an athlete, that could be advantageous to him.

“I thought Jake looked really strong in his semi-final,” he added. “He didn’t put a foot wrong. The problem is the nature of the 800 metres has altered. I don’t think, if I’m being honest, it’s strictly an endurance event anymore.

“It gives the 400 metre chancers more of a chance. In the old days

you had four rounds in four days.

But actually the ability to last four rounds in four days also meant you probably had enough background to do the 1500 as well. Most of the 800 metres runners now are struggling beyond 800 metres and two yards.”

Watching him run in this manner over two laps with his preferred event still to come, there is a temptation to get carried away by the promise of Wightman. “Jake is making good progress,” continued Coe. “Remember he was the first British athlete in ten years to win a Diamond League. It prompted me to pen a piece of paper to him. Mind you, it had to be pen and paper because

I can’t type on a computer!”

Wightman, who also had Steve Ovett’s son Freddy staying with him, has no shortage of belief in his own ability. “I’m here to get a medal,” he said. “No matter what the event. The opportunity to have two is very exciting. But however the 800 goes, I’ve got to keep my focus for the 1500m.”

Whatever happens this lunchtime – flagbearer Eilidh Doyle has her date with destiny not long before – Wightman seems headed for great things and the Gold Coast might well be the next staging post on his progress.

It always helps when you have friends in high places to call upon.

Kenya punished again in 3000m by Aisha Praught from Jamaica

Its not business as usual as the Kenyans are once again denied gold in 1500m steeplechase at the Commonwealth Games  as Jamaica’s Aisha Praught stunned Celliphine Chespol and Purity Kirui to snatch gold in the women’s 3000m steeplechase.

Prsught sprinted past Chespol to cross the line in 9:21.00 and was followed by the Kenyan 61 seconds later.

The defending champion Purity Kirui closed the podium three in 9:24.74.