Tag Archives: Giovanni Malago

Italy furious after world’s fastest man excluded from 2021 Athlete of the year list

The Italian Olympic movement is furious over the exclusion of sprinter Marcell Jacobs from the nominees list for male athlete of the year by World Athletics, with a senior official calling it “a lack of respect” and “profoundly wrong.”

The sport’s governing body announced a list of 10 nominees for the prestigious award but found no room for the only man to win two golds on the track at the Tokyo Olympics. Jacobs was the surprise Olympic champion in the 100 metres – the signature event of track and field – and also helped Italy to gold in the 4×100 relay.

“It’s profoundly wrong,” Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malagò said Friday, a day after the nominees were announced. “We’re very upset.”

Italian high jumper Gianmarco Tamberi, who tied for Olympic gold with Mutaz Barshim in his event moments before Jacobs won the 100, also failed to make the cut. Malagò said the omissions amount to “a lack of respect toward our two athletes.”

The 10 nominees are Joshua Cheptegei, Ryan Crouser, Mondo Duplantis, Jakob Ingebrigtsen, Eliud Kipchoge, Pedro Pichardo, Daniel Stahl, Miltiadis Tentoglou, Damian Warner and Karsten Warholm. The nominees were selected by an international panel of athletics experts, comprising representatives from all six continental areas of World Athletics. The winner will be announced in December.

Jacobs, also won the 60 meters at the European Indoor championships in March, did not compete after the Olympics, when he withdrew from his remaining Diamond League events to recover from a knee injury. “As always, the World Athletics Awards will recognise athletes who have performed at the highest level across the year, taking into account not only the Olympic Games, but the one-day meeting circuits,” World Athletics president Sebastian Coe said.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Double Olympic champion Jacobs shrugs off doping suspicions

Italy’s double Olympic champion Lamont Marcell Jacobs has insisted he is not bothered by suspicions of doping raised by the media, and that hard work is to thank for his record-breaking exploits in Tokyo.

Jacobs became the first Italian to win 100 metres gold, setting a European record time of 9.80 seconds in the final, and was part of his country’s triumphant 4×100 metres relay team.

The 26-year-old’s performances led to media reports highlighting doping cases involving breakout stars in athletics, stories Giovanni Malago, the president of the Italian Olympic Committee, described as “unpleasant”.

“These controversies do not affect me,” Jacobs told Il Messaggero on Monday.

“I know that I got here by making many sacrifices. I have been through disappointments and defeats, but I always got back up and rolled my sleeves up.

“If I have reached this point, it is only thanks to hard work. They can write what they want.”

Jacobs said on Saturday he had split from his former nutritionist once he heard that Giacomo Spazzini was allegedly being investigated for a connection with performance-enhancing substances.

“This is something that honestly, I am not involved with, because from the very first moment we heard about this thing that happened, we stopped working with him,” Jacobs said.

“But we are not worried; in fact the person was involved in a situation which was not his fault. At the end of the situation he was not considered guilty, so we are relaxed about it.”

Italy Olympics chief blasts Jacobs doping suspicions

Doping suspicions aimed at Italy’s 100 metres Olympic champion Lamont Marcell Jacobs are embarrassing and unpleasant, the Italian Olympic Committee (CONI) president Giovanni Malago said on Tuesday.

Jacobs claimed a stunning gold on Sunday, setting a European record time of 9.80 seconds in the showcase final in Tokyo despite having not gone under 10 seconds until this year.

However, the 26-year-old’s unexpected victory resulted in the Washington Post writing that “the history of track and field casts suspicion on sudden and immense improvement”, a reference to previous doping cases.

“Jacobs deserves the benefit of the doubt, but his sport does not,” the article added.

The Times wrote that athletics’ dark history with doping “means the arrival of any new star will alert the more sceptical”.

But Malago blasted any suggestion of wrongdoing.

“The remarks of some of your colleagues are a source of great regret and embarrassment from every point of view,” Malago told Rai Radio 1.

“We are talking about athletes, in this case, who are subjected to systematic and daily anti-doping checks.

“When you set a national or even continental record that number doubles, so much so that he said the number of checks was impressive.

“It is truly something unpleasant, it shows how some are not able to accept defeat.”

Jacobs was one of several high-profile athletes to wear new running spikes featuring “performance-enhancing” carbon soles as he won gold.

Athletes in Tokyo have also praised a fast track that has produced a host of world, continental and national records from sprint to middle distances.