Tag Archives: Galen Rupp

Grant Fisher shatters American 5000m Record

Olympian Grant Fisher kicked off his 2022 campaign in stunning fashion at the Boston University Hemery Valentine Invitational that was held on Saturday (12) in Boston, USA.

Fisher is a former high school powerhouse who won two Foot Locker titles and broke 4:00 in the mile while balancing soccer with running, delivered on his immense promise and shattered the previous record by by more than seven seconds, clocking 12:53.73.

Fisher smashed Galen Rupp’s American indoor document of 13:01.26, and missed by a whisker the Bernard Lagat’s American outside record of 12:53.60.

Fisher finished fifth at the Tokyo Olympics in10,000m and ninth in the 5000m.

This times has also placed him to fifth place in the world lists of all time that includes Kenenisa Bekele ‘s world record time of 12.49.60 (the only man under 12:50 in history). He followed by the legend Haile Gebrselassie and Daniel Komen as well as Isaiah Koech both from Kenya.

Fisher is also the first non-Kenyan or Ethiopian in history.

The Area Record is 13:01.26 and was set in 2014 in Boston by Galen Rupp.

Fisher’s performance is subject to verification by the USATF Records Committee.

All-time US indoor

5,000M

  1. 12:53.73 Grant Fisher         2022
  2. 13:00.48 Emmanuel Bor     2022
  3. 13:01.26 Galen Rupp           2014
  4. 13:05.56 Woody Kincaid     2022
  5. 13:05.85 Eric Jenkins           2017

 

 

Seifu Tura wins the 2021 Chicago Marathon

Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura took the top honors at the 43rd Edition of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon that was held on Sunday (10) in Chicago.

Seifu who finished sixth in 2019, Tura came back in a huge way at the 2021 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, beating out former champion Galen Rupp to claim his first major marathon victory. Tura, of Ethiopia, set a personal best in Milan, 2:04.29, earlier this year when he finished in fourth place.

The Ethiopian crossed the line in 2:04.29 with Rupp coming in second in 2:06.12.

This is the the third marathon victory for this young star and the first one at a the World Majors race.

Kenya’s Erick Kiptanui who was part of the thrilling three-man breakout pack, including Rupp and Tura that jostled for positions in the final quarter of the race, was forced to finish in third place after crossing the line 2:06.51

Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich target Chicago Marathon crowns

Kenya’s Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich head the fields for the Bank of America Chicago Marathon on Sunday (10), with Sara Hall and Galen Rupp leading US hopes at the World Athletics Elite Platinum Label road race.

After action in Berlin and London in recent weeks, Chicago is the next race in a busy period of major marathons and the Boston event follows just one day later. The weather in Chicago looks set to be warm, with temperatures of around 21°C expected for the start of the elite races at 7:30am local time.

The last edition of the Chicago Marathon in 2019 saw a world record fall as Kenya’s Brigid Kosgei clocked 2:14:04 to take 81 seconds from Paula Radcliffe’s 2003 mark. This time her compatriots Chepngetich, who won the 2019 world title, and Vivian Kiplagat are among the athletes in the spotlight.

Chepngetich sits fourth on the women’s marathon all-time list thanks to the 2:17:08 PB she set when winning in Dubai in 2019 and she ran a world half marathon record in Istanbul in April with 1:04:02. The 27-year-old was unable to finish the Olympic marathon in Tokyo but is looking forward to her US debut race in Chicago.

“I have never raced in the States and making my debut in such a great race like the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is more than a dream to me,” she said. “I will give all myself trying to run as fast as possible.”

Hall will be among those looking to challenge her. The US athlete beat Chepngetich at last year’s London Marathon, as the pair finished second and third respectively behind Kosgei, and Hall went on to run a PB of 2:20:32 in Arizona a couple of months later. Now she has her eye on Deena Kastor’s 2:19:36 US record, should the conditions allow.

“When I thought about where I wanted to chase the American record, I thought it would be more exciting to do it at home, in the US, and Chicago is such an epic race,” she said.

The other sub-2:25 women in the field are Kiplagat, the USA’s Keira D’Amato and Ethiopia’s Meseret Belete. Kiplagat, who ran her marathon PB of 2:21:11 in 2019, clocked 2:39:18 in Eldoret in June but showed her current form with a personal best performance in the half marathon of 1:06:07 in Copenhagen last month. Like Hall, D’Amato also ran a PB in Arizona in December, clocking 2:22:56, while 22-year-old Belete – who was sixth at the 2018 World Half Marathon Championships and ran a world U20 best of 1:07:51 later that year – has a marathon PB of 2:24:54 set when finishing fourth in Houston last year.

Among those joining them on the start line will be the USA’s Emma Bates, Diane Nukuri and Lindsay Flanagan.

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat With his PB of 2:03:55 set at the Milan Marathon in May, Kipyego goes into the Chicago race as the second fastest man in 2021. The 25-year-old made his marathon debut in Buenos Aires in 2019, clocking 2:05:18, and later that year he improved to 2:04:40 to win in Abu Dhabi, despite having started the race as a pacemaker. He also seems unfazed by the warmer than expected temperatures, simply replying: ‘No problem’ at the pre-race press conference when asked about the weather.

Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura, meanwhile, explained how he is not as comfortable in the heat but he will go into the race looking to build on the 2:04:29 PB he set when finishing fourth in that same Milan Marathon in May. He also has experience of the Chicago event, having finished sixth in 2019 in 2:08:35.

Rupp leads US hopes as the 2016 Olympic bronze medallist returns to action after his eighth place in the Tokyo Olympic marathon nine weeks ago and third-place finish in the Great North Run half marathon in 1:01:52 last month. Eighth fastest among the entries, his PB of 2:06:07 was set in Prague in 2018 but he will be looking to regain the crown he claimed in 2017.

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba is also a former Chicago winner, having triumphed in 2015, and he set his PB of 2:04:32 in the same city the year before that. The fourth sub-2:05 runner in the field is Kengo Suzuki, who broke the Japanese record with his 2:04:56 to win the Lake Biwa Marathon in February.

Kenya’s Eric Kiptanui is also one to watch. Having helped to pace world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge in the past, the 58:42 half marathon runner made his own marathon debut last year and improved to 2:05:47 to win in Siena in April. “I was so happy to run 2:06 for my first marathon,” he told NN Running Team. “What it proved to me was, yes, I was in good shape but that I had the mentality to perform over the marathon distance.” Looking ahead to Chicago, he added: “I aim to run 2:03/2:04 but my first priority is to win the race.”

Ethiopia’s Chalu Deso and Shifera Tamru have respective bests of 2:04:53 and 2:05:18, while Ian Butler, who is coached by former world record-holder Steve Jones and balances his running with his job as a teacher, is the second-fastest US runner in the field with a PB of 2:09:45 set in Arizona last year.

Galen Rupp ready for Chicago marathon

Galen Rupp may have missed out on a medal at the Tokyo Olympics but the American said on Friday that despite a short turnaround he has had a great recovery and is raring to get to the start line for this weekend’s Chicago Marathon.

Rupp, who in 2017 became the first American-born male to win the Chicago Marathon in 35 years, placed eighth at the Olympics where some major names dropped out amid humid conditions but said his coach Mike Smith has him ready for Sunday.

“I’ve actually recovered great,” Rupp, 35, told reporters. “Obviously we knew it was going to be a quick turnaround coming here so soon after the Olympics, but it’s always nice when it’s something that you’ve been planning for.

“I knew I was going to come here well in advance before the Olympics and I think Mike and I sat down and before we committed, (we) really talked about what are the pros and cons of doing this.”

Rupp last competed in the Chicago Marathon in 2019 where, after recovering from Achilles surgery and in his first race of any distance in a year, he dropped out just before the 23-mile mark with calf strain.

After Tokyo, Rupp said Smith wanted him to take a short break from intense workouts so he could reset, clear his mind and spend time at home with family before resuming training.

“I took a week pretty easy right after the Olympics, didn’t do any workouts, just ran super slow. Mike literally said ‘think about your grandma running with you,'” said Rupp, who won a bronze medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

“It’s just about moving your legs and getting out there and that’s going to help flush out a lot of junk that comes from running a marathon.”

After the second week, Rupp was nearly fully recovered and so increased his volume and added moderate workouts to the mix. In the third week post-Olympics he picked up the intensity and has been hitting it hard ever since.

Rupp now hopes a return to a course where he has enjoyed success will help him to put the disappointment of his Tokyo Olympics result behind him.

“I would say the last six weeks have been better than really anything I did before the Olympics,” said Rupp. “You’re never sure how it’s going to go coming off of a marathon like that but it’s actually been a really good build-up for Chicago here.

“I’m pumped to be racing again on Sunday, especially after having a little disappointing race in the Olympics.”

Marc Scott beats a star studded field at the Great North Run half marathon

Britain’s Marc Scott was the surprise winner at the 40th edition of the Great North Run half marathon that was held on Sunday (12) from Newcastle to South Shields in England.

The focus of this race had been drawn between the 2012 Olympic Games gold medallist in 10,000m Galen Rupp and the Tokyo 2020 Olympics bronze medallist in marathon Somali-born Belgian Bashir Abdi, but it seems the tides were changed when the shoe hit the road that allowed the Scott to show the two champions some dust.

Scott came to this race with a personal best of 1:00.35 but could not lower it as he cut the tape in 1:01.20 to take the 2021 crown.

Edward Cheserek from Kenya (L) Marc Scott from Britain (c) and Galen Rupp from United States pose for a photo after the race. PHOTO: GNR

Kenya’s Edward Cheserek took the second place in 1:01.31 while the 2012 London Olympics silver medallist, Rupp closed the podium first three finishes in 1:01.52.

Galen Rupp to battle Bashir Abdi at Great North Run

The 2012 Olympic Games gold medallist in 10,000m Galen Rupp will be the star to watch at the 40th edition of the Great North Run that will be held on Sunday (12) from Newcastle to South Shields in England.

The 2016 Rio marathon bronze medallist is coming off of an eighth place finish in the Olympic Marathon in Sapporo last month.  A veteran of seven half-marathons, the former Oregon Duck carries on his shoulder a personal best of 59:47 that he got at the 2018 Roma-Ostia half-marathon in Italy.

The 35 year-old American will battle for the top honors as he faces off with the recently crowned bronze medallist in the marathon at the 2020 Summer Olympics,  Somali-born Belgian Bashir Abdi who knows this streets well having participated in this race in 2018 where he finished in third place in 1:01.42. The 32 year-old has a personal best of 1:01.50 that he got in 2017 at the Lille Half Marathon in France.

Other established athletes slated to run are Britain’s Marc Scott who has a personal best of 1:00.35 and Jake Smith of 1:00.31 and Belgium’s Soufiane Bouchikhi of 1:02.59 are also competing on the men’s side, as is Britain’s Charlotte Purdue (1:08:23).

This year’s race has the inclusion of several track athletes making their half-marathon debuts. Those include Stewart McSweyn, the Australian record holder for both the mile (3:48.37) and 10,000m (27:23.80); Eilish McColgan, the British record holder for 5000m (14:28.55); Edward Cheserek, the Kenyan record holder for the indoor mile (3:49.44); and Dominique Scott, the South African record holder for 3000m indoors (8:41.18).

The assembled elite athletes will be fighting to try and lower the race course record of 58:56 that was set in 2011Kenya’s Martin Mathathi.

Kirui targets to reclaim Chicago Marathon title

Abel Kirui was at risk of being the forgotten man of elite marathon running until he won the 2016 Chicago Marathon title.

The Kenyan, who made his name when he won the 2009 IAAF World Championships in Berlin, had risen to be a force over the ultimate distance, defending his crown at the 2011 worlds in Daegu before winning silver at the London 2012 Olympics.

However, injury and loss of form combined to push him off the radar of elite marathon running until Oct. 9, 2016 when in brutal duel with compatriot and title-holder over the final kilometers, Dickson Chumba, Kirui prevailed in Chicago in 2:11:13.

That epic victory saw him fulfil a long held desire to finally crack America with the added bonus of winning his first world marathon majors title.

Last year, the 36-year-old to lose his title to American distance running star, Galen Rupp (2:09:20), with Kirui finishing second 30 seconds in arrears and ahead of the 2018 edition on Oct. 7, the Kenyan expressed his eagerness to reclaim his Chicago crown.

“I’d been to New York and had no luck and that’s when I said to my then coach (Renato Canova) I want to try my luck in Chicago.

“I remember it was a great fight between me and Dickson. The last 2km was not easy but I remember crossing the line in front and dancing beautifully. It was fun. That day brings back many happy memories,” he recalled.

In his third appearance at the “Windy City” Kirui is confident he will be right in the mix for the men’s title.

“I never feel any pressure in Chicago and I have so many friends here. I have had no injuries, which was totally different to last year, and I am very much hoping to be in the fight,” he added.

Since he was a young boy growing up in Nandi County in the North Rift of Kenya, the USA has always held a fascination for Kirui – one of more idiosyncratic and charismatic members of the NN Running Team.

Making his marathon debut some 12 years ago in Berlin – when he placed ninth in 2:17:47 – the gregarious athlete has since chiselled out an outstanding career over the 42.2km distance.

Claiming second in the 2007 Berlin Marathon and a winner of the 2008 Vienna Marathon he quickly established a proud marathon reputation.

Yet his breakthrough performance came at the 2009 World Championships in Berlin when he destroyed the field to win in a championship record 2:06:54 and marked the moment by breaking into his trademark celebratory post-race jig of joy.

In 2010 he traveled to the New York City Marathon to make his competitive debut in the US but the tall, slender Kenyan had to settle for a distant eighth – almost five minutes down on race winner Gebregziabher Gebremariam of Ethiopia.

More success followed for Kirui. In 2011 he retained his world marathon title in Daegu by a record victory margin of 2:28 from compatriot and NN Running Team colleague Vincent Kipruto.

In 2012 Kirui added the Olympic silver medal to his collection behind the NN Running Team’s Stephen Kiprotich of Uganda but the stone in his shoe was his lack of success and profile in the US – in 2016 he set about rectifying this fact.

In 2016, Abel, who was hunting his first marathon victory since his second world title five years earlier, finally delivered his American dream.

Source: xinhuanet.com

Erick Kiptanui and Galen Rupp withdraws from Copenhagen Half Marathon

Kenya’s Erick Kiptanui has withdrawn from the 4th edition of the Copenhagen Half Marathon that will be held on Sunday (16)  in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Kiptanui took the world with surprise when he ran the fifth fastest time in 2018 and equaled the fifth in the all-time performances for the distance.

The 28 year-old won the Berlin Half Marathon which was his third time that he was running in a half marathon with amazing splits of 5K – 13:32; 10K – 27:32; 15K– 41:38, to beat the former world marathon record holder Patrick Makau’s course record of 58:56.

Kiptanui who was short of 19 seconds of the current world record and a mere two seconds from the fastest half marathon time in seven years had vowed to bring down the course record come Sunday, “I’m coming to Copenhagen to set a new world record,” said the confident Kiptanui.

Another big name to drop out of the CPH is Galen Rupp, an Olympic marathon bronze medalist who has withdrawn his name to concentrate of defending his Chicago Marathon. title which he can use event as part of his preparations

In the women’s race World half marathon champion, Netsanet Gudeta from Ethiopia has withdrawn due to an injury she got in training while Jordan Hasay who finished third at last year’s Chicago Marathon is also preparing for the same race.

 

Eliud Kipchoge targets world record at Berlin Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge insists, again, it’s not his goal, but he takes another crack at the world record at the Berlin Marathon, on Sunday.

“I just want to run my personal best, which stands at 2:03:05,” Kipchoge said Tuesday, according to Reuters, his typical pre-race mindset. “If a world record also happens, that will be good enough.”

Kipchoge, the 33-year-old Olympic champion from Kenya, is expected to challenge the 26.2-mile record of 2:02:57, set by countryman Dennis Kimetto at the 2014 Berlin Marathon.

“Eliud is going there to run for a world record,” countryman and pacer Sammy Kitwara said, according to Reuters. “He is hoping to run a world record of 2:02:40 or thereabouts.”

Kipchoge has come close to the world record in Berlin before.

In 2015, Kipchoge ran 2:04:00 to win with his soles flapping out from the backs of his shoes.

In 2017, Kipchoge won Berlin in 2:03:32, surely slowed by the weather — rain and humidity on the pancake-flat roads of the German capital.

In 2016, Kipchoge clocked his personal-best marathon of 2:03:05 in London, which makes him the third-fastest marathoner ever after Kimetto and Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele (2:03:03).

But Kipchoge may be best known for clocking 2:00:25 in Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon attempt in May 2017 on a Formula 1 race track in Italy. The time wasn’t record-eligible, however, as Kipchoge had the benefit of pacers shuffling in and out and drinks being given to runners via mopeds.

Not counting the breaking-two attempt, Kipchoge has won eight straight marathons, which is the longest streak at the highest level of the event in at least 50 years. Other legends Abebe Bikila and Haile Gebrselassie‘s streaks topped out at six.

Though Kipchoge is a veteran, he may still be in his marathon prime at age 33 and in his 11th go at the distance.

Gebrselassie’s fastest marathon came at age 35 (in his ninth marathon); Bekele at 34 (in his fourth marathon) and Wilson Kipsang (the only man to break 2:04 four times) at 34 (in his 16th marathon).

Then there’s the course. The last six times the marathon world record was lowered, it happened in Berlin. Seven of the eight fastest times in history (on record-eligible courses) were recorded in Berlin in the last seven years.

Kipchoge would likely benefit from other fast runners pushing him. That could come in the form of Kipsang and Eritrean Zersenay Tadese, the half-marathon world-record holder, both in Sunday’s field.

Top U.S. marathoner Galen Rupp and four-time Olympic track champion Mo Farah are slated for the Chicago Marathon on Oct. 7. Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor defends his New York City Marathon title Nov. 4.

Source: olympics.nbcsports.com

 

Rodgers Kwemoi beats Galen Rupp to win Tilburg Ten Miles

Kenya’s Rodgers Kwemoi successfully defended his title at the Tilburg Ten Miles race that was held on Sunday (2) in Tilburg, Netherlands.

Kwemoi who won a gold medal in 10,000m at the World under 20 in the northern Polish city of Bydgoszcz posted a winning time of 45:03 last year, took charge of the race as he battled with Noah Kipkemoi and Peter Kiprotich both from Kenya as they sailed through the 5km mark with a split time of 13:51.

The 21 year-old Mt. Elgon born athlete held on to cut the tape in 42:15 with Noah Kipkemboi crossing the line in second place in 42:37.

Olympic marathon bronze medalist Galen Rupp from America was forced to finish in third place in 43:14.

Berhane Tesfaye from Ethiopia and Abel Chebet from Uganda crossed the line in fourth and fifth place in 43:35 and 43:42 respectively.

LEADING RESULTS
MEN

  1. Rodgers Kwemoi  (KEN) 42:15
  2. Noah Kipkemboi    (KEN) 42:37
  3. Galen Rupp           (USA) 43:14
  4. Berhane Tesfaye  (ETH) 43:35
  5. Abel Chebet          (UG )  43:44