Tag Archives: Faith Kipyegon

Christine Mboma beats Kipchoge and Kipyegon to lift the BBC African Sports Personality of the Year

Namibian sprinter Christine Mboma has been voted the BBC African Sports Personality of the Year for 2021, so becoming the first female winner in the award’s long history.

The 18-year-old became the first Namibian woman to ever win an Olympic medal when taking silver in a star-studded 200m final in Tokyo last year.

“I feel great and really proud to be a Namibian,” she told BBC Sport Africa.

“I dedicate this BBC award to all Namibians. This is [a reward] for all the hard work I have done.”

Mboma saw off Kenyan runners Eliud Kipchoge and Faith Kipyegon, South African para-athlete Ntando Mahlangu, Senegal goalkeeper Edouard Mendy and South African swimmer Tatjana Schoenmaker to win the award.

She becomes the second Namibian athlete to be recognised in such fashion, after sprinter Frankie Fredericks won the BBC African Sports Star of the Year award in 1993.

This award later became the BBC African Footballer of the Year prize, which ran from 2001 until 2018 when the BBC changed the award back to its original purpose by reflecting the diversity of sports across the continent.

“It is always great to put my country on the spot. I always make my country proud and I thank all the Namibians who voted for me. They will go crazy when they hear this,” she said upon learning of her prize.

In addition to her Olympic silver, Mboma was also a Diamond League champion and Under-20 gold medallist over 200m, and broke the Under-20 record over the distance several times last year.

All those fastest times came shortly after Mboma was barred from her preferred event, the 400m, in July, after being found to have overly-high levels of testosterone.

The sport’s governing body, World Athletics, bars all athletes with naturally-high levels of testosterone from contesting any races between 400m and the mile, arguing that it gives such athletes an unfair advantage.

“I felt disappointed but I did not give up,” she says of the time.

“I didn’t expect [the rest of 2021 would go so well] after what happened but I am really proud of myself for all the achievements I have done. It was very difficult.

“My achievement will motivate young athletes from Africa, and here in Namibia, to try to do their best and to work hard in their dream.”

Geoffrey Kamworor the star to watch at Agnes Tirop World Cross Country Tour

Three-time world half marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor will be on startline at the Agnes Tirop World Cross Country Tour that will be held on February 12 at the Lobo village in Kapseret, Uasin Gishu County.

Kamworor carries on his shoulders two senior world cross country titles that he won in 2015 and 2017 after the 2011 World Under 20 title.

The announcement was made during the launch of the World Athletics Cross Country Tour Gold by the event organizer Barnabas Korir who is also the Athletics Kenya Youth and Development chairman.

The meet will attract forty top notch athletes who have been to the event with many Kenyan athletes expected to join the list once they are selected after the AK National Cross Country Championships that will be held in Eldoret on January 22, 2022.

“Kenya will select up to ten athletes for the event. This will be part of the 40 athletes: 20 women and similar number for men that will take part in the competition. Expect a stiff competition since all athletes will be battling for points,” said Korir.

The guests present during the launch included Kenya’s Cabinet Secretary for Sports Dr. Amina Mohamed, Athletics Kenya President (Rtd) Jackson Tuwei, Uasin Gishu Governor, Jackson Mandago and Eliud Kipchoge, the world marathon record holder. Other top notch athletes included Kamworor, Faith Kipyegon, Jonathan Korir, Alice Aprot and Rhonex Kipruto.

The race category will the 10km senior men and women, 8km junior men, 6km junior women, U18 6km boys, U18 4km girls, 2km boys and 1km for children and masters race.

The winners will pocket $400,000 (Sh43m) prize money and $75,000 (Sh8m) will be set aside for the best male and female runners in the cross country tour.

‘I was just so happy to survive’ – Sifan Hassan reflects on epic Olympic treble bid

As Sifan Hassan flopped to the Tokyo track, it was difficult to guess her emotions. Joy at becoming only the second woman to complete an Olympic distance double?

Regret that the 1500m title that would have made it an unprecedented treble had slipped away the previous evening?

Relief that a campaign that covered more than 15 miles in eight days was finally over?

A mix of all three?

In fact it was none of them but rather something more primal.

“Honestly, at that moment, I was just so happy to survive,” she tells Sport Today on BBC World Service.

“I was really in pain, I was suffering so much, I was sweating very, very, very hard, all my face was burning, my hand was burning, all my body was burning. I felt I had no water inside me.

“I thought I was going to pass out. In that moment I didn’t mind about gold, I just wanted to be alive and healthy.”

The Dutchwoman’s Olympic ambitions had taken her to the very edge of her endurance.

Not since the days of sepia news reels had an athlete taken on such a monster schedule, competing in the 1500m, 5,000m and 10,000m, with the longest distance coming last on a suffocatingly humid night in the Japanese capital.

Hassan flat out, framed by worried medical staff, clutching ice to her grimacing face was the final scene.

But the 29-year-old’s epic assault on the Olympics had already featured the see-sawing emotional swings of a summer blockbuster.

On the morning of 2 August, she tripped at the start of the final lap of her 1500m heat. Her rivals cantered on as she scrabbled on the floor. For an instant it seemed her bid for three golds was over before it had really begun.

Hassan sprung to her feet, hared after the pack, made up 25 metres on them, and came through to win.

That evening, she returned to the Olympic Stadium and motored away from world champion Hellen Obiri to clinch 5,000m gold.

Despair to delight. But her second and final gold, that draining 10,000m triumph, was fuelled by anger.

Hassan had been unable to stick with the pace in the previous night’s 1500m final. Britain’s Laura Muir and Kenyan winner Faith Kipyegon turned up the heat to leave Hassan third.

On the bottom step of the podium, she stewed.

“When I lost, at the time, I was so mad,” she says.

“At the medal ceremony, when I went back to my room I knew there was something inside me.

“That was when I decided: I will die tomorrow, I will go to the end.”

Hassan’s third-place finish in the 1500m final behind Kenya’s Faith Kipyegon (centre) and Great Britain’s
Laura Muir (left) fueled her win in the next day’s 10,000m final

The frustration and disappointment came out with everything else as she emptied the tanks in her final Tokyo race.

While Hassan’s rivals picked and chose their events, zeroing in to maximise their chances of gold, she says curiosity was behind her decision to go for a full house of distance events.

Was it possible, she asked herself? Logistically, athletically, mentally, could she contend across three events at the highest level in a painfully short span of time?

She could. And now she, and others, might do it again.

“God willing,” she says, when asked about the prospect of fighting on three fronts at another major championship.

“But I don’t think it will be as hard as in Tokyo, because I have done it.

“Even if another athlete had done it, it is going to be much easier because we know it is possible.

“Something is always more difficult when we don’t know before.”

Her curiosity has been piqued by something else, though.

Hassan has plans to combine road and track, banking that her extraordinary talent can bridge the divide between the two.

She hopes to step up to marathons, while still taking on the best in stadiums. It’s another huge challenge.

Britain’s Mo Farah, himself an Olympic double distance champion, can attest to how confidence forged on the track can crumble on the tarmac, even when focusing solely on the marathon.

Hassan, though, has already shown in Tokyo that she’ll go to the brink to chase history and pursue greatness.

Laura Muir: I’ve got a few years left in these legs – Olympic silver was not the end

Laura Muir knows she may never better the Olympic silver medal that gave Britain a night to remember in Tokyo.

But as the New Year dawns she insists her first taste of global success has only made her more hungry.

Until now Muir awoke from every Hogmanay resolving to shed her ‘nearly’ tag. Not today, not after that 1,500 metres performance.

It remains to be seen whether she will ever top beating Sifan Hassan to second place behind Faith Kipyegon in a British record time.

But the 28-year-old Scot has made clear she will not fail for the want of trying.

“The fire inside me is, if anything, burning even more fiercely now,” she said. “Tokyo gave me a taste of what it’s like to be on a global podium.

“I want more of that; I want to add more medals. It’s going to be incredibly tough. This is probably the most competitive time there’s been in my event. But I’m very excited to be a part of that.”

Rather than rest on her laurels, Muir has targeted all three championships this summer: Worlds, Commonwealths and Europeans.

She has already returned to racing, winning the Scottish Short Course Cross-Country Championships.

It was small beer compared to the Olympics but it sent a message that she is back up and running, business as usual.

“I think I’ve got a few years left in these legs,” she smiled. “I’ll keep on running competitively for as long as my body holds up.

“To have finally put a performance out there that shows the calibre of athlete I am is huge for me. I always knew I could do it, but going to Tokyo and delivering has given me huge belief.

“I will now go into championships more relaxed, with the confidence that I’ve been and done it already. That’s a huge hurdle. Now I’m over it, things should be a bit smoother in that sense.

“It’s going to be hard, of course it is. But I’m incorporating more strength and conditioning work to make me stronger.

“It’s a matter of being consistent and staying injury free. If I work as hard as I can hopefully it will get me closer and closer to that golden position.”

Peres Jepchirchir and Faith Kipyegon to Battle for SOYA Sportswoman of the Year Award

Two time Olympic 1,500m champion faith Chepngetich Kipyegon, reigning Olympic Games marathon champion Peres Jepchirchir will battle for the Sports women of the year awards at the SOYA awards that will be held on January 19th at the Bukhungu Stadium in kakamega County.

Kenya rally driver Maxine Wahome, Vihiga Queens striker Jentrix Shikangwa and Kenya top player Angela Okutoyi have also been nominated for Sports women of the year awards and they will battle with the two athletics queens.

2021 SOYA Sportswoman of the Year nominees;

  1. Faith Kipyegon      – Athletics
  2. Peres Jepchirchir   – Athletics
  3. Jentrix Shikangwa – Football
  4. Angela Okutoyi      – Tennis
  5. Maxine Wahome    – Motorsports

Peres Jepcirchir and Faith Kipyegon honoured by President Uhuru Kenyatta

Tokyo Olympic Games marathon champion Peres Jepcirchir and two times Olympic Games 1,500m champion Faith Kipyegon were awarded with Order of the Grand Warrior (OGW) by President Uhuru Kenyatta.

The two athletes were feted during the Jamhuri Day celebrations held at the Uhuru Gardens, Nairobi on Sunday 12, 2021.

Faith Kipyegon receives her award Order of the Grand Warrior (OGW) from President Uhuru Kenyatta.PHOTO: State House

Jepchirchir became the first runner to win Olympic and New York Marathon titles in the same year when she fell just outside compatriot Margaret Okayo’s course record of 2:22.31 that was set in 2003 by just eight seconds, winning in 2:22.39.

Peres Jepcirchir receives her award Order of the Grand Warrior (OGW) from President Uhuru Kenyatta.PHOTO: State House

African Sports Personality Award for 2021 list revealed

The shortlist for BBC African Sports Personality of the Year 2021 award has been announced. The six contenders for the accolade were chosen by a panel of journalists from Africa and the United Kingdom.

The panel selected a shortlist based on the best African sporting achievements on the international stage in 2021 (between January and September).

The impact of the person’s achievement beyond their particular sport was also taken into account.

The nominees are:

  • Eliud Kipchoge (athletics)
  • Faith Kipyegon (athletics)
  • Ntando Mahlangu (para-athletics)
  • Christine Mboma (athletics)
  • Edouard Mendy (football)
  • Tatjana Schoenmaker (swimming)

There is more information on the nominees below, where you can also vote for the winner.

Voting closes at 23:59 GMT on Sunday, 19 December and the winner of the award will be announced on Friday, 7 January 2022 on Focus On Africa television and radio and on the BBC Sport website.

Karsten Warholm and Elaine Thompson named World Athletics Athletes of the Year

Norwegian Karsten Warholm and Jamaican Elaine Thompson-Herah were named World Athletics Athletes of the Year on Wednesday 1 December in Monaco, France.

Warholm won the men’s award beating a strong field that included fellow Olympic gold medalists Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya, Joshua Cheptegei from Uganda, Ryan Crouser from USA and Mondo Duplantis from Sweden.

Warholm broke twice what was the longest-standing world record among men’s track races set by American Kevin Young, who went 46.78 in the 1992 Olympic final. Warholm lowered it to 46.70 on July 1, then to 45.94 in the Tokyo Olympic final.

In the Olympic run alone, Warholm took 1.6 percent off the world record, just shy of Michael Johnson‘s 1.7 percent drop in the 1996 Olympic 200m final.

Warholm is the first Norwegian man to take this award.

Thompson-Herah also thrashed a strong field that included Sifan Hassan from Netherlands, Faith Kipyegon from Kenya, Sydney McLaughlin from USA and Yulimar Rojas from Venezuela.

She became the first woman to win 100m, 200m and 4x100m golds at one Olympics since Florence Griffith Joyner in 1988.

Thompson-Herah also clocked the second-fastest 100m and 200m times in history (10.54, 21.53), trailing only Griffith Joyner’s world records.

Where to Watch the World Athlete of the Year Award Ceremony

World Athletics (WA) will be holding the World Athlete of the Year ceremony today Wednesday 1 December from 6pm CET (GMT+1).

The ceremony will be streamed live across the world through the World Athletics YouTube channel and the Facebook page.

The live event will be hosted by marathon great Paula Radcliffe and long jump star Jazmin Sawyers.

Two times Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge and Two times Olympic 1500m champion Faith Kipyegon are the two Kenyans who have made it to the finals.

Below are the two WA live channels:

Twitter handle:

https://twitter.com/WorldAthletics

Facebook handle:

https://web.facebook.com/WorldAthletics

 

Faith Kipyegon invited as chief guest at the Great Ethiopian Run

Two times Olympic champion Faith Kipyegon has been invited as the chief guest at the 2021 Total Energies Great Ethiopian Run that will be held on Sunday 14 November 2021 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The 27 year-old will appear alongside the running legend Haile Gebreselassie at both the pre-race press conference and at the special Gala Dinner that will held at Hyatt Regency Hotel on the eve of the race.

The National 1500m record holder spoke about this trip early this year, “For many years I have also wanted to visit our neighbor Ethiopia. Haile has had such a big impact on running in both Kenya and Ethiopia and it is an honor for me to accept his invitation to this year’s race.”

Iam very happy to support the great Ethiopian Run which has inspired so many young athletes and is also helping people to stay active and lead a healthy lifestyle.”

Great Ethiopian general manager Dagmawit Amare said that Faith’s visit will create great excitement around the race weekend, adding, “As one of Kenya’s greatest ever athlete with an amazing record of championships victories, Faith is well-known to athletics fans in Ethiopia. It will be great honor for us to have her with us for the race.”

Faith claimed her first Olympic medal in Rio in 2016 and then in 2017 took her first senior world title in London. She defended her Olympic title at the Tokyo games in August. In all these races she came up against strong Ethiopian opposition including the likes of Genzebe Dibaba and Senberi Teferi.