Tag Archives: Eliud Kipchoge

Karsten Warholm and Elaine Thompson named World Athletics Athletes of the Year

Norwegian Karsten Warholm and Jamaican Elaine Thompson-Herah were named World Athletics Athletes of the Year on Wednesday 1 December in Monaco, France.

Warholm won the men’s award beating a strong field that included fellow Olympic gold medalists Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya, Joshua Cheptegei from Uganda, Ryan Crouser from USA and Mondo Duplantis from Sweden.

Warholm broke twice what was the longest-standing world record among men’s track races set by American Kevin Young, who went 46.78 in the 1992 Olympic final. Warholm lowered it to 46.70 on July 1, then to 45.94 in the Tokyo Olympic final.

In the Olympic run alone, Warholm took 1.6 percent off the world record, just shy of Michael Johnson‘s 1.7 percent drop in the 1996 Olympic 200m final.

Warholm is the first Norwegian man to take this award.

Thompson-Herah also thrashed a strong field that included Sifan Hassan from Netherlands, Faith Kipyegon from Kenya, Sydney McLaughlin from USA and Yulimar Rojas from Venezuela.

She became the first woman to win 100m, 200m and 4x100m golds at one Olympics since Florence Griffith Joyner in 1988.

Thompson-Herah also clocked the second-fastest 100m and 200m times in history (10.54, 21.53), trailing only Griffith Joyner’s world records.

Where to Watch the World Athlete of the Year Award Ceremony

World Athletics (WA) will be holding the World Athlete of the Year ceremony today Wednesday 1 December from 6pm CET (GMT+1).

The ceremony will be streamed live across the world through the World Athletics YouTube channel and the Facebook page.

The live event will be hosted by marathon great Paula Radcliffe and long jump star Jazmin Sawyers.

Two times Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge and Two times Olympic 1500m champion Faith Kipyegon are the two Kenyans who have made it to the finals.

Below are the two WA live channels:

Twitter handle:

https://twitter.com/WorldAthletics

Facebook handle:

https://web.facebook.com/WorldAthletics

 

Kipchoge, Cheptegei sail to the World Male Athlete of the Year Award Finals

Two times Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge and Olympic 5000m champion Joshua Cheptegei have sailed through to the finals of the World Athletics’ Male Athlete of the Year award that will be held on December 1.

Kipchoge became the first man since 1980 to successfully defend his Olympic marathon title, and his time of 2 hours 8min 38sec gave him a winning margin of 80 seconds – the biggest at the Games since 1972.

Sweden’s Mondo Duplantis still has a chance at winning the award for the second year running. He achieved Olympic, Diamond League and European indoor titles in the pole vault. Karsten Warholm from Norway is the other finalist, having twice broken the 400m hurdles world record set by American Kevin Young that had stood for more than 28 years.

Also on the battle for the prestigious award is the undefeated American shot putter Ryan Crouser.

The shocker of the night is Norway’s Tokyo 2020 and European Indoor 1500m gold medallist Jakob Ingebrigtsen who failed to make the cut for not gaining enough votes.

World Athletics revealed last month the initial shortlist of 10 Olympic champions last month, and a three-way voting process reduced the number to half.

The World Athletics Council’s votes are 50 per cent of the result, with the World Athletics Family and public votes both holding 25 per cent.

Abdi Nageeye: Victory at the New York City Marathon Would Inspire Somalis and Refugees

Abdi Nageeye captured hearts worldwide with his Olympic marathon silver at the Tokyo 2020 which also resonated with refugee communities.

The celebrations spread across the Netherlands, his adopted home after escaping war in Somalia, and in Kenya, the long-distance powerhouse where he honed his running career.

The Tokyo silver was the Netherlands’ second-ever medal in the Olympic marathon event and another example for Kenya’s High-Altitude Training Camp to boast about.

My target is to win. I really believe now that I can – Abdi Nageeye ahead of the 2021 New York City Marathon

On November 7, the Dutch runner will pound the streets of the New York City Marathon for the first time seeking to end his season with a victory to add to his cherished Olympic medal, after proving that he can run with ‘the best in the world’.

“My target is to win. I really believe now that I’m good in the race where you have a championship field, where you aim for the podium. I have good sprints and confidence,” he told Olympics.com from his home in Eldoret, Kenya.

But, even more important for Nageeye, is cementing his role as a huge inspiration for the younger generations in Somalia.

Olympic silver medalist Abdi Nageeye celebrates crossing the finish line at Tokyo 2020. Picture by 2021 Getty Images

Abdi Nageeye: From Somalia to the Netherlands

Aged six, Abdi Nageeye left Somalia with his brother for the Netherlands. After a four-year stint in Europe, the siblings left for Syria and returned home to Somalia. It wasn’t long before the teenager resettled back in the Netherlands with his adopted family via Ethiopia.

Like most boys, the young teen enjoyed playing football. One day, he laced up his running shoes for a 5km run, which he completed in a relatively fast 17 minutes.

That was in 2006. He turned out to be a good runner and was encouraged to exploit his new interest. A year later he debuted for the Netherlands, in a junior race, at the European Cross-Country Championships.

That marked the start of an athletics career that has seen Nageeye compete at European and World Championships, two Olympic Games and run marathons in major cities.

His national record and personal best of 2:06.17 at the 2019 Amsterdam Marathon remains ‘one of the best days’ of his life.

“That race gave me a lot of confidence. I ran that race with an injury from 33km, a lot of cramping on my hamstring. And it’s that confidence that I had until the Olympics,” he recalled of the race where he placed fourth.

Abdi Nageeye: The Olympic lesson in Rio and the medal in Tokyo

The run in Amsterdam fanned his ambition of making the podium at a major championship.

“I knew I was able to do something. I never showed it at the [2018] European Championships, I didn’t prepare smart enough, but I knew I was able to run well and to win major marathons. But people want to receive the result at the finish line, and I was not able to do it.”

His Rio 2016 experience, where he finished 11th, counted for something when he lined up for the Olympic marathon in Sapporo.

When Eliud Kipchoge confirmed his greatness by clinching his second consecutive Olympic gold,only Nageeye came close.

Gold medalist Eliud Kipchoge of Team Kenya (L) hugs silver medalist Abdi Nageeye of Team Netherlands (R) after completing the men’s Olympic marathon in Japan. Picture by 2021 Getty Images

As they had done many times in training in Kaptagat, when he trained with Kipchoge, and his renowned coach Patrick Sang, the Dutch runner followed his lead when he broke away from the pack around the 30km mark.

“I knew I had this big chance with the whole world watching and I said I will show them what I can do.”- Abdi Nageeye on the silver at Tokyo 2020.

He created a near-perfect race, though it was a long and hard chase behind Kipchoge, his efforts were rewarded. Abdi took an Olympic silver medal with a season’s best time of 2:09:58.

“It was a long journey, the preparations… there were three Kenyans and three Ethiopians who are normally very strong…Then, there I was at the finish line, number two. It was a good feeling!”

The 32-year-old was cheered to the line in Sapporo by Kipchoge.

“When I was crossing the finish line, I was like, ‘We did it!’”

Abdi Nageeye: Inspirational legacy from Eliud Kipchoge

Nageeye may have shifted his training base to Iten, considered the cradle of Kenyan long-distance training, but the values he picked up from Eliud Kipchoge remain.

“He’s the greatest! Nobody can argue with that, he’s the greatest! From Eliud, I learned to take my time and focus on the progress. I learned the importance of discipline.”

Nageeye now trains remotely with Gary Lough, the coach of four-time Olympic gold medallist Mo Farah.

The British coach also coaches Somali-born Belgian Bashir Abdi who edged past Kenyan Lawrence Cherono in the home stretch for bronze at the Olympics.

“The whole of Somalia was watching us at that moment, and they were talking about us. Most of them started running because of Mo Farah and many will start now because of me and Bashir.”

It has been 13 weeks since the epic Olympic race and Nageeye is on the entry list for the New York City Marathon, looking to capitalise on his newfound fame and form.

“I think I will be in good shape as it is more of a championship race, if I was trying to run 2:04 [below the course record], it would not be possible. I’ll be ready.”

The Dutch half-marathon record holder who lives in the running town of Eldoret is giving himself every shot.

“I’m good in the race where you have this championship field, where you are just aiming for the podium. I have good sprints, confidence, I’m training well until now, so my goal really is to win this race.”

Abdi Nageeye: Motivation to be the best

The second-fastest man over the marathon Kenenisa Bekele leads the men’s field in the 2021 New York City Marathon that includes a handful of previous podium finishers.

Ethiopia’s Girma Bekele Gebre, third in 2019, and the 2016 New York champion Ghirmay Ghebreslassie of Eritrea are both considered top-three contenders.

“I am just hearing one or two names but I’m not focusing on that. I’m focusing on training and to be as fit as possible at the start line. It’s only when I get to the athletes’ hotel [in New York], and I see the faces and say ‘OK, you are there, and you too,’ and then I will make my plan,” said the marathoner who ran the Boston Marathon twice finishing 7th in 2018.

Just like at the Olympics, his motivation to win his debut New York Marathon runs deep.

“In Somalia, our last world champion was in 1987, that’s Abdi Bile and they just know him. That’s it. They even named a popular Toyota pick up after him, the Abdi Bile car,” he explained.

Bile, the 1996 Olympian, is Somalia’s most decorated athlete in history and still holds several national records.

“In Somalia, they don’t know much about running… The civil war put a pause on everything. So, it’s up to us to educate them, help them to understand and practice sport. Not only those in Somalia but the Somali community around the world.”

Getty Images

Source: olympics.com

Eliud Kipchoge dines with world leaders at the UN Climate Change Conference

World Marathon Record Holder Eliud Kipchoge joined more than 120 World Leaders at the 26th edition of the Conference of the Parties serving (COPS26) summit that is being held in Glasgow, Scotland.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson invited Heads of State and Government to participate in a World Leaders Summit, which started yesterday Monday, 1 November, and Tuesday, 2 November, when the first part of the high-level segment for Heads of State and Government during the conference will also take place.

The invitation signifies the importance for world leaders to deliver concrete actions and credible plans aimed at achieving successful COP goals and coordinated action to tackle climate change.

The two times Olympic champion mingled with the world kings and Queens at the summit as he had also been invited to press for action to halt and reverse forest loss.

Kipchoge sat along the Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta as they held talks at the ongoing United Nations Climate Change Conference.

 

Eliud Kipchoge tours PSG Home Ground

World Marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge was today got a tour at the Paris Saint-Germain (PSG) training camp in Paris, France.

The Double Olympic champion met with top players of the club and wished them a good game ahead of weekend’s match.

Kipchoge also met with PSG head coach Mauricio Pochettino for the second time after meeting him while still at Tottenham Hotspur F.C.

“I cherish the relation with Mauricio Pochettino and his coaching staff. Warm and good people!” said Kipchoge.

President Uhuru Kenyatta congratulates Kipchoge for being awarded the best male athlete 2020

President Uhuru Kenyatta has congratulated the two times Olympic marathon Champion Eliud Kipchoge for winning the Association of National Olympic Committees (ANOC) Award for the Best Male Athlete at the Tokyo Olympics.

In a press statement released through the state house social media platform, Uhuru said the award by ANOC is a global recognition of Kenya’s prominence as a sporting nation.

The marathon world record holder was nominated for the award alongside nine other athletes that included Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei who finally won two gold medals in 5000m and 10,000m at Tokyo Olympics games in August.

Kipchoge in his acceptance speech said, “It is an honour to win the ANOC Award for the Best Male Athlete at the Tokyo Olympics. With so many beautiful performances by so many athletes, I am proud to be the recipient of this award.”

Kipchoge joined two legends who have won an Olympic medal two times. Ethiopia’s Abebe Bikila was the first person to win two times the Olympic marathon medal when he won his first gold medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome while running barefoot then in 1964 he won his second gold medal.

East German Waldemar Cierpinski, won at the Montreal 1976 and Moscow 1980.

Kipchoge’s margin of victory of 80 seconds was the biggest in an Olympic marathon since Frank Shorter’s win at Munich 1972.

Eliud Kipchoge honored as the best male athlete at ANOC awards

Two times Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge was the winner of the 7th edition of the Association of National Olympic Committees (ANOC) Awards that was held on Sunday (24)

Kipchoge was feted with the prestigious prize following his heroics during the postponed Tokyo 2020 Games staged in Japan between June and July.

The 36-year-old showed the intent of proving once again why he is the world’s greatest after the 30km-mark when he broke away from the group to take a comfortable lead.

reported clocked an impressive 2.08.38 to storm to victory to win Team Kenya’s fourth gold medal in Tokyo, finishing ahead of Abdi Negeeye from the Netherlands and Bashir Abdi from Belgium.

Kipchoge joined two legends who have won an Olympic medal two times. Ethiopia’s Abebe Bekel was the first person to win two times the Olympic marathon medal when he won his first gold medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome while running barefoot then in 1964 he won his second gold medal.

East German Waldemar Cierpinski, won at the Montreal 1976 and Moscow 1980.

Kipchoge’s margin of victory of 80 seconds was the biggest in an Olympic marathon since Frank Shorter’s win at Munich 1972.

Italy furious after world’s fastest man excluded from 2021 Athlete of the year list

The Italian Olympic movement is furious over the exclusion of sprinter Marcell Jacobs from the nominees list for male athlete of the year by World Athletics, with a senior official calling it “a lack of respect” and “profoundly wrong.”

The sport’s governing body announced a list of 10 nominees for the prestigious award but found no room for the only man to win two golds on the track at the Tokyo Olympics. Jacobs was the surprise Olympic champion in the 100 metres – the signature event of track and field – and also helped Italy to gold in the 4×100 relay.

“It’s profoundly wrong,” Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malagò said Friday, a day after the nominees were announced. “We’re very upset.”

Italian high jumper Gianmarco Tamberi, who tied for Olympic gold with Mutaz Barshim in his event moments before Jacobs won the 100, also failed to make the cut. Malagò said the omissions amount to “a lack of respect toward our two athletes.”

The 10 nominees are Joshua Cheptegei, Ryan Crouser, Mondo Duplantis, Jakob Ingebrigtsen, Eliud Kipchoge, Pedro Pichardo, Daniel Stahl, Miltiadis Tentoglou, Damian Warner and Karsten Warholm. The nominees were selected by an international panel of athletics experts, comprising representatives from all six continental areas of World Athletics. The winner will be announced in December.

Jacobs, also won the 60 meters at the European Indoor championships in March, did not compete after the Olympics, when he withdrew from his remaining Diamond League events to recover from a knee injury. “As always, the World Athletics Awards will recognise athletes who have performed at the highest level across the year, taking into account not only the Olympic Games, but the one-day meeting circuits,” World Athletics president Sebastian Coe said.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Eliud Kipchoge nominated for Male Athlete of the Year award

World marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge is among the 10 nominees for the Male Athlete of the Year, World Athletics has announced.

The 36 year-old defended his Rio title at the Tokyo Olympics.

The nominees for 2021 Male World Athlete of the Year are:

  1. Joshua Cheptegei Uganda (Olympic 5000m and 10000m champion)
  2. Ryan Crouser (American shot putter and discus thrower)
  3. Mondo Duplantis – Swedish–American pole vaulter and the current world indoor record holder
  4. Jakob Ingebrigtsen Norwegian middle-distance runner. Won gold at the 1500m in the Olympics
  5. Pedro Pichardo Cuban-born Portuguese triple jumper and current Olympic
  6. Daniel Stahl – Swedish athlete specializing in the discus throw
  7. Miltiadis Tentoglou – Greek Long jump athlete who won gold at Tokyo 2020
  8. Damian Warner Canadian track and field athlete specializing in decathlon. He is a 2020 Olympic champion and is set to be inducted to Canada’s Walk of fame
  9. Karsten Warholm – Norwegian athlete specializing in 400m hurdles. He won gold at the men’s 400m hurdles final at Tokyo 2020

The voting process officially began on Thursday, with the World Athletics Council and the World Athletics Family set to cast their votes by email.

For fans, they will be able to vote via the World Athletics social media platforms either by ‘liking’ a graphic of their favourite athlete or via a retweet on twitter.