Tag Archives: Dickson Chumba

Shifera Tamru beats Dickson Chumba at Daegu Marathon

Ethiopi’s Shifera Aredo Tamru beat the race favorite Dickson Chmuba to claim the 12th edition of the Daegu Marathon title that was held early Sunday (3) morning in Daegu, South Korea.

The 33 year-old who came to this race with a personal best of 2:05.18 that he got in 2019 at the Dubai marathon beat a strong field that Chumba, who was the fastest athlete on paper with a time of 2:04.32 that he got at the Chicago marathon in 2014.

The race was decided between the three athletes, Tamru, Chumba and Shali by a powerful from the Ethiopian who pulled away from the two to cut the in a time of 2:07.15. All the three podium finishers were given the same.

Morocco’s Shali closed the podium three finishes with the same time margin of 2:07.15.

The Porto course record holder Zablon Chuma from Kenya and Ethiopia’s Belew Derseh finished in fourth and fifth place in a time of 2:07.18 and 2:07.27.

Two more Kenyans Bethwel Rutto and Jackson Kiprop finished in eighth and ninth place in a time of 2:09.18 and 2:09.43 respectively.

The race course record of 2:05.33 that was set by Filex Kipchirchir Kiprotich from Kenya in 2019 remains standing.

Eliud Kipchoge smashes the Tokyo Marathon course record

World Marathon record holder lived to the expectations as he smashed the course record of the 16th edition of the Tokyo Marathon which is a World Athletics Elite Platinum Label road race that was held on Sunday (6) in Tokyo, Japan.

Kipchoge who was making his marathon debut started pulling away from his only competitor, Amos Kipruto from Kenya at the 36km mark as he went on a solo mission to crush the previous course record of 2:03.58 that had been set by Wilson Kipsang in 2017.

Kipchoge ran the fastest time ever on Japanese soil which is also the fourth fastest time in the world when he registered a new course record of 2:02.40.

Kipruto the 2019 World Athletics bronze medallist,  came home under the old course record as he crossed the line in second with a life time best of 2:03.13.

The 2016 Olympic bronze medallist, Tamirat Tola from Ethiopia, remained with the lead group of three then slowly started drifting back from the 30km mark, was forced to settle in third place as he  to closed the first three podium finishes in a time of 2:04.14.

Japan’s Kengo Suzuki was on another world as he ran the second Japanese fastest time ever when he crossed the line in fourth place in a personal best of 2:05.28.

Laban Korir also from Kenya found the going too tough as slipped back crossing the finish line in a distant eight place in a time of 2:06.37.

Changes to the course enabled runners to finish earlier than previous editions of the event.

14 Elite athletes withdraw from the Chicago Marathon

The race organizers 43rd edition of the Chicago Marathon has announced significant changes to their elite field.

Fourteen (14) elite athletes have withdrawn while seventeen elite athletes (17) have been added.

Among those who have withdrawn in the men category include Getaneh Molla from Ethiopia who holds a personal best of 2:03.34, Bahrain’s Hassan El Abbassi of 2:04.43, Kenya’s Joel Kimurer who has a personal best of 2:05.19, Laban Korir of 2:05.54, and Masato Kikuchi of 2:07.20 from Japan.

The top women elites who have withdrawn are Mexico’s Vianney De La Rosa who has a personal best of 2:20.04 and Britain’s Rosie Edwards of pb 2:31.56.

The oraganisers have now included Kenya’s Dickson Chumba who has appeared on the Chicago podium three times including a victory in 2015 and he holds a personal best of 2:04.32.

The fastest man that has been included in this field is Reuben Kipyego from Kenya who comes to this race with 2:03.55 that he got early this year at the Generali Milano Marathon, where he finished in second place.

Kenya’s Eric Kiptanui—also known as “captain of the pacemakers” and “kingmaker” for his work leading a team of 41 pacemakers to help teammate Eliud Kipchoge run a blistering 1:59.40 marathon in Vienna in –2019—enters this year’s Bank of America Chicago Marathon with a fresh personal best, 2:05:47.

Japan’s nation’s national marathon record holder, Kengo Suzuki of who holds a personal best of 2:04.56  and Ethiopia’s Chalu Deso of pb 2:04.53 who finished sixth at the Valencia Marathon in 2020 have also been included.

The women elite side, Vivian Kiplagat comes with a personal best of 2:21.11 with Ethiopia’s Meseret Belete who holds a pb of 2:24.54 and Americans Carrie Dimoff and Maegan Krifchin both with personal best of 2:31.12 and 2:33.14respectively have joined the race.

The top runners will receive USD 55,000, down from USD 100,000 in 2019 when the race was last contested. The winning wheelchair athletes will receive $20,000, and the top American runners will get $15,000 (equal to 2019). Although the event has a history of fast times, organizers are not offering any publicly-reported time bonuses this year.

Kenyans Brigid Kosgei and Lawrence Cherono, who are the reigning champion will not be racing this year. Kosgei who set a world record of 2:14.04 when she won the 2019 edition, ran the Virgin Money London Marathon last Sunday and finished fourth. She also won the silver medal at the Olympic Marathon in Sapporo last August. Cherono, finished fourth at the Olympic Marathon and has not been announced for a fall marathon.

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Kirui targets to reclaim Chicago Marathon title

Abel Kirui was at risk of being the forgotten man of elite marathon running until he won the 2016 Chicago Marathon title.

The Kenyan, who made his name when he won the 2009 IAAF World Championships in Berlin, had risen to be a force over the ultimate distance, defending his crown at the 2011 worlds in Daegu before winning silver at the London 2012 Olympics.

However, injury and loss of form combined to push him off the radar of elite marathon running until Oct. 9, 2016 when in brutal duel with compatriot and title-holder over the final kilometers, Dickson Chumba, Kirui prevailed in Chicago in 2:11:13.

That epic victory saw him fulfil a long held desire to finally crack America with the added bonus of winning his first world marathon majors title.

Last year, the 36-year-old to lose his title to American distance running star, Galen Rupp (2:09:20), with Kirui finishing second 30 seconds in arrears and ahead of the 2018 edition on Oct. 7, the Kenyan expressed his eagerness to reclaim his Chicago crown.

“I’d been to New York and had no luck and that’s when I said to my then coach (Renato Canova) I want to try my luck in Chicago.

“I remember it was a great fight between me and Dickson. The last 2km was not easy but I remember crossing the line in front and dancing beautifully. It was fun. That day brings back many happy memories,” he recalled.

In his third appearance at the “Windy City” Kirui is confident he will be right in the mix for the men’s title.

“I never feel any pressure in Chicago and I have so many friends here. I have had no injuries, which was totally different to last year, and I am very much hoping to be in the fight,” he added.

Since he was a young boy growing up in Nandi County in the North Rift of Kenya, the USA has always held a fascination for Kirui – one of more idiosyncratic and charismatic members of the NN Running Team.

Making his marathon debut some 12 years ago in Berlin – when he placed ninth in 2:17:47 – the gregarious athlete has since chiselled out an outstanding career over the 42.2km distance.

Claiming second in the 2007 Berlin Marathon and a winner of the 2008 Vienna Marathon he quickly established a proud marathon reputation.

Yet his breakthrough performance came at the 2009 World Championships in Berlin when he destroyed the field to win in a championship record 2:06:54 and marked the moment by breaking into his trademark celebratory post-race jig of joy.

In 2010 he traveled to the New York City Marathon to make his competitive debut in the US but the tall, slender Kenyan had to settle for a distant eighth – almost five minutes down on race winner Gebregziabher Gebremariam of Ethiopia.

More success followed for Kirui. In 2011 he retained his world marathon title in Daegu by a record victory margin of 2:28 from compatriot and NN Running Team colleague Vincent Kipruto.

In 2012 Kirui added the Olympic silver medal to his collection behind the NN Running Team’s Stephen Kiprotich of Uganda but the stone in his shoe was his lack of success and profile in the US – in 2016 he set about rectifying this fact.

In 2016, Abel, who was hunting his first marathon victory since his second world title five years earlier, finally delivered his American dream.

Source: xinhuanet.com

Watch Out: Kipruto Warns Kipchoge and Kipsang ahead of Berlin Marathon

Watch out for Kenya’s Amos Kipruto overshadowed by the publicity on Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge and former world record holder Wilson Kipsang hitting the headlines in the media ahead of Sunday’s Berlin Marathon.

Kipruto has been overshadowed in the media by race favourites Kipsang and Kipchoge but he is raring to go and cause an upset to the bigwigs.

Kipruto who may not be chasing for the world record like his compatriots Kipchoge and Kipsang is aiming for a win.

Kipruto who is under the “2 Running Club” banner will be up against Iten-based Kipsang (with a personal best time two hours, three minutes), who is managed by Volare Sports Management and Kipchoge (2:03:05), who is under Global Sports Communication in Kaptagat who are both eyeing a world record.

He is confident after his training session went on well without any incident and is optimistic he will do well on Sunday.

Based in Kapsabet, Nandi County, Kipruto might be the next world beater going by his record lately.

He started the season well after participating in his first World Marathon Majors race in Tokyo where he emerged third with his compatriot and training partner Dickson Chumba winning the race.

In 2017, Kipruto won Seoul Marathon after running in 2:05:54 before coming in fifth position in Amsterdam Marathon where he clocked 2:05:43.

Kipruto, who won in his debut marathon at the Rome Marathon (2:08:12) in 2016 said will not be going for the marathon record but wants to be in the podium after 42km.

“I will be targeting to run well and looking forward to lower my personal best because Berlin has a fast course,” said Kipruto.

He also said that his main target in the races is to get experience so that he can calculate how he can also one day be a world record holder.

Kipruto’s Italian coach, Claudio Berardelli, says Kipruto is strong and should perform well in the race.

“Kipruto has exhibited his potential capabilities in his training and I know he is going to perform well on Sunday,” said the coach.

Kipsang eyes Berlin

Former world marathon record holder Wilson Kipsang is currently doing at least 40km a day in readiness for the next month’s Berlin Marathon.

The two-time London marathon champion said the mileage in training is to ensure he is fit for Berlin race. He said he is currently enjoying top form and cannot rule out a course record if not a world record currently held by his training-mate at Volare Sports, Dennis Kimetto.
Kimetto broke Kipsang’s world record of 2:03.23 in 2014 after winning the race in 2:02.57 ahead of his training-mate Emmanuel Mutai.

“I am trying my best to be fit enough to take on the world champions at Berlin. I am currently undergoing intense training to ensure I achieve my target of the best time possible,” said the 2012 Olympic Games marathon silver medallist.
In 2016, Kipsang finished second behind Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele, who was named in the provisional starting list but later pulled out of Berlin.

“I ran a good race in 2013 and I want to emulate that and come home a better man. My target is to come with a world record if possible depending on the weather and my shape on the day,” added Kipsang, who is also the 2014 New York City Marathon champion.
Last year, Kipsang failed to win New York City Marathon, finishing second to three-time World Half Marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor.

“I miscalculated my timing in New York and Kamworor was on point, which was good for us as Team Kenya. It was good for Kamworor to win his maiden title on the course,” added former world marathon record holder. Owing to a bad weather in Japan, Kipsang fell to Dickson Chumba, failing to defend his title early this year.

“This year in Tokyo, It was too hot for me and I failed to run the way I had planned. Being the defending champion, you have a lot of burden since everyone is looking upon you but luckily, just like in New York, a Kenyan won the title, which was a great deal,” added Kipsang.

Abel Kirui,Dickson Chumba and Brigid Kosgei Headline Bank of America Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that several international running stars are joining the 41st annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon elite athlete competition.

Past champions Abel Kirui (KEN) and Dickson Chumba (KEN) lead the charge on the men’s side, and 2017 runner-up Brigid Kosgei (KEN) and two-time podium finisher Birhane Dibaba (ETH) stand out among the women. They will join previously announced global sensations Mo Farah (GBR), Yuki Kawauchi (JPN) and Suguru Osako (JPN).

This year’s elite field includes 11 men who have run 2:07 or faster and nine women (including three Americans) who have run 2:25 or faster. Moreover, it features five of the top eight men who placed on top of the Abbott World Marathon Majors (AbbottWMM) Series XI leaderboard and two of the top seven women.

“We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Bank of America Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski. ‘This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international and American athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago.”

Men’s International Field

Dickson Chumba set his personal best, 2:04:32, in Chicago in 2014 when he finished third on a historic day that witnessed three of the top five times ever run in Chicago (Chumba is the fifth fastest runner in Chicago’s history). He came back to win in 2015 and while he tried to defend his title in 2016, he came up three seconds short, finishing second to Abel Kirui. Since he embarked on his marathon career in 2010, he has finished 17 marathons and he boasts an impressive record: five wins, five runner-ups and four third place finishes. He lines up this fall after opening his 2018 season with his second win at the Tokyo Marathon. His time, 2:05:30, was the second fastest winning time in Tokyo’s history. Chumba finished in fifth place on the AbbottWMM Series XI leaderboard.

Abel Kirui literally danced across the finish line when he won his first AbbottWMM in Chicago in 2016, defeating a strong field in a tactical race that saw erratic pace swings from 4:33 per mile to 5:24. He returned in 2017 to defend his title, but he failed to match Galen Rupp’s kick at the end. Kirui consistently performs well in both tactical and paced races; he finished fourth in London to commence his 2018 season, and he owns a personal best of 2:05:04. Kirui also stands out as one of the most decorated athletes in the field – he took home a silver medal in the marathon at the 2012 London Olympics and he won both the 2009 and 2011 IAAF World Marathon Championships.

Mosinet Geremew (ETH) and Birhanu Legese (ETH) bring both youth and speed to a competitive international field. Geremew started 2018 with a bang, breaking the course record in Dubai and posting a fresh personal best, 2:04:00. He has run south of the hour mark four times in the half marathon, and he is a four-time winner of the Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon. Chicago marks his second shot at competing in an AbbottWMM (and just his fourth go at 42K). He lined up last fall in Berlin and ran away with an impressive third place finish.

Legese, the youngest athlete in this year’s elite field, opened the year by making his marathon debut in Dubai, finishing sixth in a swift 2:04:15. Prior to moving up in distance, he specialized in the half marathon, winning titles in New Delhi (twice), Berlin and the United Arab Emirates. He holds a personal best in the half of 59:20.

Kenneth Kipkemoi (KEN), Paul Lonyangata (KEN), Geoffrey Kirui (KEN), Bedan Karoki (KEN), Stephen Sambu (KEN) and Augustine Choge (KEN) continue the marathon’s tradition of welcoming strong athletes from Kenya to the windy city. Kipkemoi boasts the 25th fastest time in history over the half marathon distance, 59:01, and he started 2018 with a successful marathon debut, running 2:05:44 to win the Rotterdam Marathon. He has represented Kenya in both the half marathon and the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships.

Lonyangata just missed a spot in the top three in Chicago in 2016, coming home in fourth after enduring uneven pace swings. He set his personal best, 2:06:10, while winning the 2017 Paris Marathon, and he welcomed 2018 by becoming the first back-to-back winner of the Paris Marathon in nearly two decades.

Geoffrey Kirui experienced a significant career breakthrough when he won the laurel wreath at the 2017 Boston Marathon, shaking off American Galen Rupp in the 24th mile to cruise home to victory. That win set him up for what happened next: he took the crown at the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships.

Kirui returned to Boston this spring to defend his title, but he failed to match the strides of a hard charging Yuki Kawauchi and he was forced to settle for second. October marks Kirui’s second attempt in Chicago – he made his marathon debut here in 2014, but he dropped out of the race.

Karoki, a two-time Olympian in the 10,000m, is an exciting athlete who made his marathon debut in 2017. Prior to jumping to the marathon, he spent nearly a decade polishing his speed on the track, representing Kenya three times in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships. He made a splash this winter when he won the Ras Al Khaimah International Half Marathon in a blistering 58:42, making him the fourth fastest man in history in the half (with the fifth fastest time). He finished second at the 2016 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships, and he has finished third and fifth at the London Marathon in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

As a four-time winner of the Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K (with three of the 14 fastest times in course history), Sambu returns to Chicago as a fan favorite. He made his marathon debut here in 2016 with a fifth place finish, and he returned in 2017 to accrue another fifth place. Sambu’s speed over shorter distances predicts a faster marathon PR. With the reintroduction of pacers into this year’s field, Sambu could finally land in the top three.

Choge, a 2008 Olympian in the 1500m, has been a factor on the global stage for nearly half his life. He competed as a junior and, as a senior competitor, he has amassed an impressive resume: a world record as part of the 4x1500m Kenyan relay team, a Commonwealth Games 5000m win, a silver and bronze at the indoor IAAF World Championships, five Diamond League titles and eight Gold League wins. Choge started his transition to the roads in 2013 and he holds a personal best of 59:26 in the half. He will be making his marathon debut on October 7.

Ryo Kiname (JPN) joins previously announced Kawauchi as strong contender from Japan. Kiname, racing in North America for the first time, enters Chicago with a fresh personal best and a seventh place finish from the 2018 Tokyo Marathon, 2:08:08. He has one marathon career win to his name – the Sapporo Hokkaido Marathon in 2016.

International men’s elite field

Name

Mosinet Geremew

Birhanu Legese

Dickson Chumba

Abel Kirui

Kenneth Kipkemoi

Paul Lonyangata

Mo Farah

Geoffrey Kirui

Suguru Osako

Bedan Karoki

Ryo Kiname

Yuki Kawauchi

Mohamed Reda

Stephen Sambu

Tsukasa Koyama

Yohei Suzuki

Taku Fujimoto

Pardon Ndhlovu

Daniel Wallis

Augustine Choge

Hugh Williams

Country

ETH

ETH

KEN

KEN

KEN

KEN

GBR

KEN

JPN

KEN

JPN

JPN

MAR

KEN

JPN

JPN

JPN

ZIM

NZL

KEN

AUS

Personal best

2:04:00

2:04:15

2:04:32

2:05:04

2:05:44

2:06:10

2:06:21

2:06:27

2:07:19

2:07:41

2:08:08

2:08:14

2:09:18

2:11:07

2:11:20

2:14:53

2:15:30

2:16:22

2:19:24

Debut

Debut

Women’s International Field

Brigid Kosgei (KEN) ran spectacularly in Chicago last fall, finishing second to Tirunesh Dibaba, arguably one of the greatest runners in history. En route to her second place finish in Chicago, she smashed her personal best, running 2:20:22. Nine weeks later, she won the Honolulu Marathon in 2:22:15, a course record by over five minutes. Kosgei recorded her first marathon finish in 2015, and she has been making waves ever since. Most recently, she finished second in London in a new PR, 2:20:13. She finished in third place on the AbbottWMM leaderboard.

Roza Dereje (ETH) impressed fans in Dubai to start her 2018 season, taking down the course record and setting a three-minute PR, 2:19:17, to become the eighth fastest woman in history. She followed Dubai with another personal best, 1:07:00, and a second place finish in April at the Istanbul Half Marathon. Prior to gaining global recognition this winter, she started making a name for herself after she won the Shanghai Marathon twice in 2016 and 2017; in 2017, she posted the second fastest time, 2:22:43, in the history of the Shanghai Marathon. Dereje made her global debut in 2015 with a 2:34:02 marathon. Since then, she has run nine marathons. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon marks her first time running in an AbbottWMM.

Birhane Dibaba (ETH) took home a pair of third place finishes in Chicago in 2014 and 2015, and she arrives this fall with something only 27 women have accomplished in history: a sub 2:20 PR. Dibaba joined this exclusive club after winning the Tokyo Marathon this winter in 2:19:51. She primarily races the marathon distance, and she has finished in the top five of 13 of the 14 marathons she has run. Her compatriot, Shure Demise (ETH), is running her first Bank of America Chicago Marathon, but she has fared well on the global stage since she picked up back-to-back wins in Toronto in 2015 and 2016. She set her personal best, 2:20:59, at the 2015 Dubai Marathon. She performed well at the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships, finishing fifth. She opened her 2018 season with a fourth place at the Tokyo Marathon.

Yuka Ando (JPN) made headlines in 2017 (just shy of her 23rd birthday) when she clocked the fastest ever debut marathon by a Japanese woman, 2:21:36, at the Nagoya Marathon. Her debut performance also made her the fourth fastest woman in Japan’s history, and it was the fastest time by a Japanese woman since 2005. As a result, she punched her ticket to the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships where she finished 17th. She kicked off her 2018 season with a third place finish at the Osaka Marathon, but most of her energy this summer has been focused on the track sharpening her speed over 5000m and 10,000m.

Madai Perez (MEX) is back after a successful run in 2017. A two-time Olympian in the marathon, announced her comeback last fall with a 2:24:44 fourth place finish in Chicago. She logged this time fourteen years after she made her marathon debut in Chicago, and 11 years after she ran her still-standing personal best in Chicago, 2:22:59. She is a national champion in the 10,000m (2003, 2010) and a silver medalist in the Pan American Games Marathon, (2011); she has also represented Mexico at the IAAF World Championships in both the marathon and half marathon.

Alexi Pappas (GRE) announced her debut on Instagram, writing “I’ve broken tape in Chicago * paced the 26.2 ‘ I’m coming back this October ‘ to chase what I dream to do: my MARATHON DEBUT!” Pappas, a 2016 Olympian (she holds dual Greek and American citizenship), is familiar with the energy and enthusiasm of Chicago’s running community.

She won the 2015 and 2016 Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K, but her first experience in Chicago was the 2014 Bank of America Chicago Marathon where she led a group of U.S. Olympic Trials hopefuls as a pacer. Pappas experienced an impressive Olympic debut performance in the 10,000m. She set the Greek national record and a new PR to finish 17th in 31:36.16.

Other notable athletes include Jessica Draskau Petersson (DEN) with a personal best of 2:30:07; Vianey De la Rosa (MEX) with a personal best of 2:32:01; Dayna Pidhoresky (CAN) with a personal best of 2:36:08; and Hiruni Wijayaratne (SRI) with a personal best of 2:36:35.

International women’s elite field

 

Name

Roza Dereje

Birhane Dibaba

Brigid Kosgei

Shure Demise

Yuka Ando

Madai Perez

Jessica Draskau Petersson

Vianey De la Rosa

Dayna Pidhoresky

Hiruni Wijayaratne

Melanie Myrand

Chirine Njeim

Alexi Pappas

Country

ETH

ETH

KEN

ETH

JPN

MEX

DEN

MEX

CAN

SRI

CAN

LBN

GRE

Personal best

2:19:17

2:19:51

2:20:13

2:20:59

2:21:36

2:22:59

2:30:07

2:32:01

2:36:08

2:36:35

2:39:07

2:39:21

Debut

Journalists interested in covering the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon can apply for media credentials now at ChicagoMarathon.com.

Source: Runnersweb.com

Stage set for Abbott World Marathon Majors Series finale

There is plenty to play for as we reach the conclusion of Series XI of the Abbott World Marathon Majors at the 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon.

It’s been a rollercoaster ride for many of the world’s greatest marathon athletes, and after six races we are still unclear as to who will scoop the $250,000 top prize on 22 April.

The Series got underway in spectacular style in the English capital as Mary Keitany scorched her way to a women’s only world record of 2:17:01, beating Paula Radcliffe’s mark of 2:17:42 set in 2005.

Daniel Wanjiru made it a Kenyan double in the open division with his win in the men’s race and there was home crowd delight as David Weir took his seventh London wheelchair title, beating Marcel Hug in a hard-fought sprint along The Mall. Manuela Schär claimed the women’s crown to begin a dominant Series for the Swiss racer.

The open Series made a quick return to London in the summer, as it encompassed the 2017 IAAF World Athletics Championships, where Geoffrey Kiriu of Kenya maintained the form he had shown to win the 2017 Boston Marathon to take the gold and 25 points on offer in the Abbott WMM competition. Rose Chelimo of Bahrain was the women’s champion, beating the veteran Edna Kiplagat into second place as she crossed the finish line on Tower Bridge.

The Series then recommenced in the rain of Berlin where the stage had been set for a tussle between three of the best men in marathon history as Series IX and X champion Eluid Kipchoge faced off against Series VII king Wilson Kipsang and Ethiopian legend Kenenisa Bekele, who had finished second in London in the spring.

The contest provided the perfect stage for the world record to tumble, but Bekele and Kipsang could not last the distance in the German capital and dropped out to leave Kipchoge in a shoot-out with surprise package Guye Adola. The Kenyan legend won the battle of wits and eased to his first win of the Series.

Gladys Cherono took the women’s title with a 22-second margin over Ethiopian Ruti Aga, and there was a second win of the women’s wheelchair Series for Schär, who was matched by her compatriot Hug in the men’s race.

Schär would not get it all her own way in the next stop for the Series at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, as a resurgent Tatyana McFadden edged a sprint finish with training partner Amanda McGrory, the Swiss star just two seconds behind them. No such problems for Hug who was crowned Chicago champion for the second time with a sprint victory over Australia’s Kurt Fearnley.

In the open division, Tirunesh Dibaba claimed her maiden Abbott WMM race win to add to her second in London, while the USA was able to celebrate its first male winner in Chicago since 2002 when Galen Rupp, former training partner to Mo Farah, ran away from the pack with three miles to go to take the tape and fire himself into Series contention.

The American fairytale was to continue on the damp streets of New York City, but this time in the women’s division. In a race dominated in recent years by Keitany, the Kenyan was beaten by Shalane Flanagan in a memorable run that saw the Boston-born athlete punching the air with delight as she romped home through Central Park.

There was a Kenyan one-two in the men’s race, with Geoffrey Kamworor just about holding off the late-charging Wilson Kipsang to win his first Abbott WMM race.

Manuela Schär returned to the top of the podium in the women’s wheelchair race, turning the tables on McFadden and matching Hug who claimed the men’s wheelchair race.

Kipsang was the firm favourite to finally claim a win in this Series in Tokyo when the show rolled into the Japanese capital in February.

But the 36-year-old succumbed to an illness picked up prior to the race and stepped off the road just 17km into proceedings. Kipsang’s withdrawal opened the door for his compatriot Dickson Chumba to run away from the field and claim a second Tokyo title.

The roars were arguably louder for the man who followed him home, however, as Yuta Shitara smashed the Japanese national record and Asian record, having carved his way from fifth to second in the late stages. Birhane Dibaba also scooped her second Tokyo victory in the women’s race.

There was more home joy in the men’s wheelchair tussle as 51-year-old Hiroyuki Yamamoto made a daring early break stick. With just Tomoki Suzuki for company, Yamamoto rounded the final bend on one wheel before out-muscling his younger compatriot for a famous victory. 

Manuela Schär again proved head and shoulders above her competition with her fourth win in five Series races to establish an unassailable lead, McFadden coming home over a minute behind her rival.

And so as we head for Boston and – just six days later ¬– close the Series in London, the wheelchair spoils are largely decided with Schär and Hug both uncatchable.

But there is the potential for drama aplenty in both open divisions.

Flanagan can take a commanding position in the fight for the Series XI title if she can claim victory in Boston on 16 April.

The American scored 25 points with her win at the TCS New York City Marathon, and can move to 50 with a second triumph of the campaign.

A first place for Flanagan would deny a third Series crown for Keitany when she mounts the defence of her London title.

The Kenyan is now hunting Paula Radcliffe’s male pacemaker-assisted time of 02:15:25 in London. But Keitany’s defeat to Flanagan in Central Park last November means the Marblehead native has a better head-to-head record than the two-time Series champion.

With only the top two results counting for open division athletes, that win for Flanagan on the streets of New York City means if both women end up with two wins apiece, we will have the first American women’s champion in the history of the Series.

But Flanagan, who missed last year’s Boston Marathon with a stress fracture in her back, will have her work cut out if she is to make it to that Boylston Street Finish Line ahead of the pack.

Alongside a formidable-looking American field, defending champion Edna Kiplagat will be desperate to repeat her success of 2017. The veteran Kenyan can take a share of the lead on 41 points if she can claim the spoils on Patriots Day.

World champion Chelimo, Berlin winner Cherono and Chicago champ Dibaba are all due to be on the start line in London, too and will all still have a shot at the title.

On the men’s side, Geoffrey Kirui, who is also seeking to retain his status as Boston champion after rounding off Series X with a win there, can move to 50 points with victory after being crowned world champion last summer in London. 

The same goes for Rupp who can also make it two wins from two appearances.

A win for either will leave it down to one of Kipchoge or Wanjiru to match them in London. In that scenario, there will have been no head to head between the only two men on 50 points, forcing a vote by the six race directors to find the men’s Series XI winner. Should neither Kipchoge or Wanjiru secure first or second place 22 April, and Rupp and Kirui both miss out in Boston, the door is open for the likes of Bekele and Adola to sneak into first place. Calculators at the ready.

Source: virginmoneylondonmarathon.com

Chumba wins Tokyo Marathon

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba took the Tokyo town bt storm when he won the Tokyo Marathon that was held on Sunday (25) in Tokyo, Japan.

Chumba, who won in 2014 and has placed third the past three years, crossed the tape in 2:05.30, while fellow Kenyan Amos Kipruto finished third in 2:06.33.

Hiroto Inoue improved on his 2017 eighth-place result and finished fifth in 2:06.54, and compatriot Ryo Kiname was seventh in 2:08.08.

Ethiopia’s Birhane Dibaba won the women’s race, finishing in 2:19.51, with Hiroko Yoshitomi clocking the fastest time for Japan at 2:30.16 in sixth place.