Tag Archives: Des Linden

Peres Jepchirchir to debut at New York Marathon

Olympic Marathon Champion Peres Jepchirchir,will make debut at 50th edition of the New York City Marathon that will be held on 7, November 2021 in New York.

Jepchirhir will have a rematch with Tokyo 2020 marathon bronze medallist Molly Seidel of the United States.

In what is the deepest American field in recent years, Seidel will have tough competition against fellow U.S. teammates from Tokyo, Sally Kipyego and Aliphine Tuliamuk. Fellow Olympian Emily Sisson will be returning to the marathon distance after finishing 10th in the 10,000m with a teime of 31:09 on the track. Sisson holds the second-fastest time in the elite field – 2:23.08, just behind the 2018 Boston Marathon champion Des Linden of 2:22.28 who is also racing New York.

Jepchirchir comes to the TCS New York Marathon off not only winning the Olympic gold in Tokyo but six straight road race wins in her last six races. The 27 year-old is the race favourite.

Another Kenyan who will be chasing for the podium is Violah Cheptoo who will also be making her debut in the marathon, with a personal bests of 1:06 over the half-marathon distance and 30:55 for 10Km.

Kamworor and Flanagan to defend their New York City Marathon titles

Reigning TCS New York City Marathon champions Geoffrey Kamworor and Shalane Flanagan will defend their titles at the IAAF Gold Label road race on Sunday 4 November.

At last year’s race, Kamworor claimed his first major marathon victory while Flanagan became the first US woman to win in New York since Miki Gorman did so in 1977.

Kamworor held off compatriot Wilson Kipsang down the final turns in Central Park to win last year. The 2015 runner-up separated himself from the field with a 4:31 penultimate mile to finish in 2:10:53.

The Kenyan has won the past three IAAF World Half Marathon Championships and recorded three consecutive sub-2:07 performances at the Berlin Marathon from 2012-2014, with his 2:06:12 clocking from 2012 remaining his personal best.

“Racing once more in the TCS New York City Marathon means so much to me,” said the three-time world cross-country champion. “It is my favourite race, and although thousands of miles separate my training base in Kaptagat, Kenya to New York, the event feels like home.”

Flanagan ended a 40-year drought for US women at the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon by seizing the crown from Kenya’s Mary Keitany with a time of 2:26:53. With her first victory in just her second appearance at the New York City Marathon – she was runner-up in her marathon debut in 2010 – Flanagan became the sixth US women’s champion in the event.

The 16-time national champion and Olympic silver medallist will join previously announced Des Linden, the 2018 Boston Marathon champion, and Allie Kieffer, the fifth-place finisher at last year’s TCS New York City Marathon.

“When I think about returning to race in New York City, I’m flooded with magical memories,” said Flanagan. “My heart skips a beat, I get butterflies in my stomach, and my palms get sweaty. New York City is incredibly special to me. It’s where I ran my first marathon in 2010, placing second, and of course, my dream-come-true moment in 2017 when I won.”

Flanagan to defend New York City Marathon title rather than retire

Shalane Flanagan considered retirement. The decision? She’s not done racing.

Flanagan will defend her New York City Marathon title on Nov. 4, according to The New York Times.

“When I think about running New York, I get a feeling of ecstasy; my stomach turns,” she said, according to the newspaper. “It’s like if you’re dating someone and it goes well and you want more.”

Last year, Flanagan became the first U.S. female runner to win New York in 40 years. That followed one of the most difficult years (injury, missing world champs) of the four-time Olympian’s elite career that has spanned 16 years.

Flanagan teased possible retirement before and after that victory. But the Massachusetts native signed up for one more Boston Marathon this year, finishing seventh in the dreadful weather and a race won by countrywoman Des Linden.

After, Flanagan said she didn’t know what the future held, only that she had raced Boston for the last time as an elite.

The 37-year-old hasn’t ruled out going for the 2020 Olympics, when she could be the first U.S. distance runner to compete in five Games. She would be the third-oldest female U.S. Olympic runner after marathoners Colleen de Reuck (2004) and Francie Larrieu-Smith(1992), according to Olympic historians.

Flanagan won the 2012 Olympic Trials and has finished first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, ninth and ninth in her major marathon career to go along with her 2008 Olympic 10,000m silver medal.

Wacera lifts B.A.A. 10K Race title

Kenya’s Mary Wacera took top honors at t5he 8th edition of the B.A.A. 10K race that was held on Sunday (24) in Boston.

The 29 year-old faced one of the strongest fields in its eight-year history, bringing together Boston Marathon champions, Olympians, and global medalists on the roads of Boston.

Des Linden returns to the roads of Boston for her B.A.A. 10K debut. Linden became the first American woman since 1985 to win the open division at the Boston Marathon. A two-time Olympian, Linden will look to become the first woman to win both the Boston Marathon and the B.A.A. 10K in the same year since 2011. In addition to Linden, Buzunesh Deba, and Caroline Rotich and 2018 Paris Marathon women champion Betsy Saina was also on start line up.

Other notable figures are Ethiopians Mamitu Daska, two-time B.A.A. 5K winner Buze Diriba were also aiming for a first B.A.A. 10K crown.

Olympic silver medalist Sally Kipyego, and road racing ace Lineth Chepkurui were also on the battle front.

Wacera maintained her calm as she also faced stiff challenge but manage to give a powerful kick that enabled her her to out run Rotich cutting the tape in 31:55 with Rotcih crossing the line two seconds later to take second place.

Ethiopian Daska closed the top three podium finish in 31:59.

Diriba and Monicah Ngige took fourth and fifth place in 32:09 and 32:30.

Saina and Kipyego finished distant seventh and tenth place in 33:06 and 34:31

LEADING RESULTS
WOMEN

  1. Mary Wacera      (KEN) 31:55
  2. Caroline Rotich  (KEN) 31:57
  3. Mamitu Daska    (ETH) 31:59
  4. Buze Diriba        (ETH) 32:09
  5. Monicah Ngige   (KEN) 32:30