Tag Archives: Dathan Ritzenhein

10 reasons Yuki Kawauchi, Boston marathon winner, should be your favourite runner

Yuki warmed up for the Boston Marathon by running in his home race, the Kuki half marathon, dressed as a panda. He had previously set an unofficial world record in the same race for 13.1miles in a three piece suit. In his panda costume, he ran 1hr 10min 03sec, finishing second, and beating his brother Yoshiki.

  1. Yuki holds plenty of other world records too, including the most sub 2hr 12min marathons by one person: 25 of them. He also has the world record for the most sub 2hr 20min marathons: an astonishing 79.
  2. Yuki beat some of the favourites in Boston, including the 2016 Olympic bronze medallist Galen Rupp, but he isn’t a full-time athlete. He fits his training around working 40 hours a week as a government clerk, from 1pm-9pm. Which surely gives hope to all us.
  3. Because he works full time, doesn’t belong to one of the Japanese teams and accepts no corporate sponsorship, his nickname is the “citizen runner”.
  4. Unlike almost every other elite runner, he only runs once a day – he works 40 hours a week, from 1pm – 9pm every day. On his days off he frequently does long runs of upwards of 50km at a jogging pace.
Running in a business suit: yet another of Yuki’s records
5. When he finished 14th at the Tokyo marathon in 2012, failing to qualify for the Japanese team for the         Olympics in London, he shaved his head by way of apology. “I felt that I had to give everyone who supported me a sign of my remorse. “It’s better that my shame be exposed for everyone to see” he said.
6. His PB is 2hr 08min 14sec. Only three American men (Khalid Khannouchi, Ryan Hall and Dathan Ritzenhein) have faster times, and only one British (Steve Jones). He may be an amateur runner, but his times are not.
7.  He’s aiming to run 100 marathons under 2hr 20 before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. He has run four so far this year, winning all of them. His race calendaris pretty full …
8. When he was six, Yuki ran 7:30 for 1500m. His mother, a former runner herself, decided to coach him and had him running daily time trials in his local park. Every day he was to beat his personal record, and if he missed by 30 seconds or more, he had to run an extra lap. If he missed by more than a minute, two extra laps.
Marshfield’s freezing conditions
9. On New Year’s Day this year he ran and won the Marshfield Road Runners NYD marathon in 2:18.59. The temperature during the race was -23 C. It is thought to be the coldest sub 2:20min marathon ever run.
10. Because of his job, he’s not allowed to accept sponsorship money. He can, however, accept prize money (he’ll get $150k for winning Boston). He’s supposed to be back at work on Wednesday. He’ll be racing again this weekend, in a half marathon back in Japan.

Ben True Became First American Man To Win NYC Half Marathon

Saucony athlete Ben True, the American record-holder for 5K on the roads, became the first American men’s open division winner at the 2018 New York City Half Marathon that was held on Sunday (18).

At his first attempt at the distance, the 32-year-old True crossed the finish line in 1:02:39, three seconds ahead of two-time Olympian and fellow American Dathan Ritzenhein. The field in Sunday’s race included nine Olympians overall who navigated a route from Prospect Park in Brooklyn to Central Park in Manhattan.

“The way Ben handled Sunday’s world class field, deep with Olympians and the marathon-distance elite, tells us he’s on track for more great performances in 2018,” said Amanda Reiss, chief marketing officer for Saucony. “Ben is not only an incredibly gifted runner but a tremendous person who shares our brand’s values, inspiring runners everywhere to ‘run their world.’ Ben continues to help us set the standards for performance innovation, working with our design team to create the footwear that empowers runners to achieve their personal best, just as he does. The entire Saucony family is incredibly proud of Ben and we wish him a tremendous Spring racing season.”

“Knowing that most of the field were marathoners, or at least have done the half many times before, I knew that I probably had a little bit better closing speed than them,” said True, who ran in the Saucony Type A8. “I hid for the majority of the race and then used my speed to get around the other competitors over the last kilometer. I appreciated all the support from the spectators who braved the cold out there, as well as my Saucony family who believes in me as much as I do them.”

True of Hanover, NH, is the American record holder for 5K with a time of 13:20. He has won seven national titles on the road at distances including 5K, 10K, 15K, and 10 miles and has twice been the top U.S. finisher at the world cross country championships. True’s 6th-place finish at world cross in 2013 led the American men to a surprise team silver medal. He is coached by Ray Treacy, who is also the Cross Country and Track and Field coach at Providence College in Rhode Island.

Two-time Olympian and Saucony athlete Molly Huddle became the first American ever to win the NYC Half Marathon in 2015. She went on to claim victory there in 2016 and 2017 to make it three in a row.

Source: runnersweb.com

These Are the World’s Fastest Marathoners, and Marathon Courses

Below you’ll find tables detailing several marathon superlatives:

  • the 10 fastest marathoners in history on record-eligible courses;
  • the 10 fastest American marathoners in history on record-eligible courses;
  • the 10 fastest performances on record-eligible courses;
  • the fastest courses for men and women;
  • the progression of the world records since 1988.

Note that we said “on record-eligible courses.” That’s why Eliud Kipchoge is listed as the third-fastest man in history, despite his 2:00:25 run at Nike’s Breaking2 marathon in May 2017. That time doesn’t count for record purposes because standard competition rules for pacing and fluids weren’t followed. Similarly, Boston Marathon course record holder Geoffrey Mutai is listed as the tenth-fastest man in history, even though his 2:03:03 at Boston in 2011 is equal to the third-fastest time in history. Because of its point-to-point layout and too-great net elevation drop, Boston’s course doesn’t count for record purposes. (Times from it are included in the fastest-courses tables.)

Each marathoner appears on the first list, for the fastest performers in history, only once. The third set of tables, for fastest performances in history, allows for a runner to appear more than once. For example, world record-holder Paula Radcliffe appears four times in the fastest-performances list.

The tables are current as of February 26, 2018.

Above, watch Eliud Kipchoge run a 2:00.25 in the Breaking2 attempt held in Monza, Italy.

Looking for 13.1 miles? We also have a list of the world’s fastest half marathoners.

10 Fastest Marathoners on Record-Eligible Course: Men

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Dennis Kimetto (Kenya) 2:02:57 4:41.4 Berlin, 2014
Kenenisa Bekele (Ethiopia) 2:03:03 4:41.6 Berlin, 2016
Eliud Kipchoge (Kenya) 2:03:05 4:41.7 London, 2016
Emmanuel Mutai (Kenya) 2:03:13 4:42.0 Berlin, 2014
Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) 2:03:13 4:42.0 Berlin, 2016
Patrick Makau (Kenya) 2:03:38 4:43.0 Berlin, 2011
Guye Adola (Ethiopia) 2:03:46 4:43.3 Berlin, 2017
Stanley Biwott (Kenya) 2:03:51 4:43.4 London, 2016
Haile Gebrselassie (Ethiopia) 2:03:59 4:43.7 Berlin, 2008
Mosinet Geremew (Ethiopia) 2:04:00 4:43.7 Dubai, 2018

10 Fastest Marathoners on Record-Eligible Course: Women

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) 2:15:25 5:09.9 London, 2003
Mary Keitany (Kenya) 2:17:01 5:13.6 London, 2017
Tirunesh Dibaba (Ethiopia) 2:17:56 5:15.7 London, 2017
Catherine Ndereba (Kenya) 2:18:47 5:17.6 Chicago, 2001
Tiki Gelana (Ethiopia) 2:18:58 5:18.0 Rotterdam, 2012
Mizuki Noguchi (Japan) 2:19:12 5:18.6 Berlin, 2005
Roza Dereje (Ethiopia) 2:19:17 5:18.8 Dubai, 2018
Irina Mikitenko (Germany) 2:19:19 5:18.8 Berlin, 2008
Gladys Cherono (Kenya) 2:19:25 5:19.0 Berlin, 2015
Faysa Tadese (Ethiopia) 2:19:30 5:19.3 Dubai, 2018

10 Fastest American Marathoners on Record-Eligible Course: Men

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Khalid Khannouchi 2:05:38 4:47.5 London, 2002
Ryan Hall 2:06:17 4:49.0 London, 2008
Dathan Ritzenhein 2:07:47 4:52.4 Chicago, 2012
Abdi Abdirahman 2:08:56 4:55.0 Chicago, 2006
Meb Keflezighi 2:09:08 4:55.5 Olympic Marathon Trials, 2012
Galen Rupp 2:09:20 4:56.0 Chicago, 2017
Alberto Salazar 2:09:21 4:56.0 Fukuoka, 1983
David Morris 2:09:32 4:56.4 Chicago, 1999
Jerry Lawson 2:09:35 4:56.5 Chicago, 1997
Dick Beardsley 2:09:37 4:56.6 Grandma’s, 1981

10 Fastest American Marathoners on Record-Eligible Course: Women

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Deena Kastor 2:19:36 5:19.5 London, 2006
Jordan Hasay 2:20:57 5:22.7 Chicago, 2017
Shalane Flanagan 2:21:14 5:23.2 Berlin, 2014
Joan Samuelson 2:21:21 5:23.5 Chicago, 1985
Amy Cragg 2:21:42 5:24.3 Tokyo, 2018
Laura Thweatt 2:25:38 5:33.3 London, 2017
Kara Goucher 2:25:53 5:33.9 New York City, 2008
Desiree Linden 2:25:55 5:33.9 Olympic Marathon Trials, 2012
Magdalena Lewy Boulet 2:26:22 5:35.0 Rotterdam, 2010
Serena Burla 2:26:53 5:36.1 Osaka, 2017

10 Fastest Marathons on Record-Eligible Course: Men

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Dennis Kimetto (Kenya) 2:02:57 4:41.4 Berlin, 2014
Kenenisa Bekele (Ethiopia) 2:03:03 4:41.6 Berlin, 2016
Eliud Kipchoge (Kenya) 2:03:05 4:41.7 London, 2016
Emmanuel Mutai (Kenya) 2:03:13 4:42.0 Berlin, 2014
Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) 2:03:13 4:42.0 Berlin, 2016
Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) 2:03:23 4:42.4 Berlin, 2013
Eliud Kipchoge (Kenya) 2:03:32 4:42.7 Berlin, 2017
Patrick Makau (Kenya) 2:03:38 4:43.0 Berlin, 2011
Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) 2:03:42 4:43.0 Frankfurt, 2011
Dennis Kimetto (Kenya) 2:03:45 4:43.2 Chicago, 2013

10 Fastest Marathons on Record-Eligible Course: Women

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) 2:15:25 5:09.9 London, 2003
Mary Keitany (Kenya) 2:17:01 5:13.6 London, 2017
Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) 2:17:18 5:14.2 Chicago, 2002
Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) 2:17:42 5:15.1 London, 2005
Tirunesh Dibaba (Ethiopia) 2:17:56 5:15.7 London, 2017
Tirunesh Dibaba (Ethiopia) 2:18:31 5:17.1 Chicago, 2017
Mary Keitany (Kenya) 2:18:37 5:17.2 London, 2012
Catherine Ndereba (Kenya) 2:18:47 5:17.6 Chicago, 2001
Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) 2:18:56 5:17.9 London, 2002
Tiki Gelana (Ethiopia) 2:18:58 5:18.0 Rotterdam, 2012

Progression of World Record Since 1988: Men

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Belayneh Densamo (Ethiopia) 2:06:50 4:50.3 Rotterdam, 1988
Ronaldo da Costa (Brazil) 2:06:06 4:48.6 Berlin, 1998
Khalid Khannouchi (Morocco) 2:05:42 4:47.7 Chicago, 1999
Khalid Khannouchi (United States) 2:05:38 4:47.5 London, 2002
Paul Tergat (Kenya) 2:04:55 4:45.9 Berlin, 2003
Haile Gebrselassie (Ethiopia) 2:04:26 4:44.8 Berlin, 2007
Haile Gebrselassie (Ethiopia) 2:03:59 4:43.7 Berlin, 2008
Patrick Makau (Kenya) 2:03:38 4:43.0 Berlin, 2011
Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) 2:03:23 4:42.4 Berlin, 2013
Dennis Kimetto (Kenya) 2:02:57 4:41.4 Berlin, 2014

Progression of World Record Since 1988: Women

Runner Time Pace Per Mile Marathon
Tegla Loroupe (Kenya) 2:20:47 5:22.2 Rotterdam, 1998
Tegla Loroupe (Kenya) 2:20:43 5:22.0 Berlin, 1999
Naoko Takahashi (Japan) 2:19:46 5:19.8 Berlin, 2001
Catherine Ndereba (Kenya) 2:18:47 5:17.6 Chicago, 2001
Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) 2:17:18 5:14.2 Chicago, 2002
Paula Radcliffe (Great Britain) 2:15:25 5:09.9 London, 2003

Average of Top 10 Performances in Race History: Men

Average of Top 10 Performances Marathon
1 2:03:28 Berlin
2 2:04:13 Dubai
3 2:04:34 London
4 2:04:40 Chicago
5 2:04:52 Rotterdam
6 2:05:39 Boston
7 2:05:40 Frankfurt
8 2:05:47 Amsterdam
9 2:05:57 Paris
10 2:06:05 Seoul

Average of Top 10 Performances in Race History: Women

Average of Top 10 Performances Marathon
1 2:18:26 London
2 2:19:42 Dubai
3 2:19:45 Chicago
4 2:19:52 Berlin
5 2:20:53 Boston
6 2:22:32 Frankfurt
7 2:22:36 Osaka
8 2:22:36 Beijing
9 2:22:50 Rotterdam
10 2:22:50 Paris

Source: runnersworld.com