Tag Archives: Danil Lysenko

World Athletics Council prolongs suspension of Russia

The World Athletics Council has recommended the Congress of the global governing body of track and field athletics to prolong the membership suspension of the All-Russia Athletics Federation (RusAF) until all reinstatement requirements are met, World Athletics President Sebastian Coe said on Wednesday.

Addressing the World Athletics Congress meeting on Wednesday, Coe said that the organization’s Council recommended earlier the 53rd Congress “to maintain the suspension of RusAF’s membership until all the agreed conditions” were implemented.

World Athletics and RusAF

World Athletics, suspended RusAF’s membership in November 2015, following a wave of anti-doping rules violations and formed a special mission on the issue. World Athletics, however, allowed clean athletes from Russia to participate in international tournaments under the neutral status or the Authorized Neutral Athlete (ANA) until the membership of the RusAF is reinstated. The ANA status prohibited Russian athletes from participating in all international track and field tournaments under the national flag.

The World Athletics Council announced on November 22, 2019 its decision to extend the suspension of RusAF’s reinstatement process, based on charges brought by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU). According to World Athletics, the AIU charged RusAF on November 21, 2019 “with obstructing an investigation and provisionally suspended several senior federation officials for tampering and complicity.”

The provisionally suspended senior officials at that time were then-President of RusAF Dmitry Shlyakhtin and several more high-ranking people from the federation for helping to falsify documents, which Russian high jumper Danil Lysenko presented as his excuse for skipping doping tests.

In March 2020, the World Athletics Council ruled to fine RusAF $5 million for an alleged involvement of the previous executive administration’s attempt to forge official documents of high jumper Danil Lysenko. RusAF repaid the fine on August 12, 2020.

Source: tass.com

Russian high jumper blames officials for doping suspension

High jumper Danil Lysenko, suspended for anti-doping violations in a case that rattled Russian sport, has admitted guilt for his offences but said he blames the athletics federation for a plan to forge documents to try to evade punishment.

Lysenko, silver medallist at the 2017 World Athletics Championships, was provisionally suspended in 2018 after recording three whereabouts failures within a 12-month period, once missing a doping test and twice failing to provide his whereabouts to anti-doping authorities.

The aftermath plunged Russia’s athletics federation, suspended since 2015 for mass doping across the sport, into more turmoil after senior federation officials became embroiled in a scheme to forge medical documents and provide false explanations to justify Lysenko’s violations.

“Of course I could have said no, but I didn’t,” Lysenko, whose suspension ends in August next year, told Reuters. “I listened to the bosses and decided to do as they said.”

The 24-year-old said he had been negligent on reporting his whereabouts and had in no way attempted to conceal the use of banned substances. He also said he regretted going along with what he referred to as the federation’s plan to “help him”.

When asked to comment on Lysenko’s claim it was the federation’s idea to forge the documents, Dmitry Shlyakhtin, the federation’s president at the time, told Reuters: “Let that remain on his conscience for the rest of his life. Until the grave!” He did comment further.

Shlyakhtin received a four-year suspension over the case.

The conspiracy unravelled when the Monaco-based Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU), which oversees integrity issues in the sport, questioned the information provided by Lysenko.

The Moscow clinic that allegedly treated Lysenko for suspected appendicitis – the original reason provided for not entering his whereabouts in an online system that allows doping control officers to locate athletes – did not exist. The timeline of a car accident to justify another violation did not stand up to scrutiny.

Lysenko did not initially tell investigators the truth because he feared for his safety if he implicated senior federation officials. He later assisted investigators in bringing charges against some officials, which led to his suspension being shortened by two years.

Five federation officials, including Shlyakhtin, were suspended over the case.

Lysenko’s coach, Evgeny Zagorulko, was also provisionally suspended. His lawyers submitted a request to the Lausanne-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to have his suspension revised in light of his assistance to investigators. Zagurolko died in April, before the court could make a ruling.

In November 2019 the case prompted World Athletics, the sport’s international governing body, to stop authorising Russians to compete internationally as neutral athletes.

It later relaunched that process but fined the federation $10 million and limited the number of Russians eligible to compete in athletics at the Tokyo Olympics to 10.

“I’m certainly aware that innocent athletes have suffered because of this situation,” said Lysenko, the 2018 world indoor champion. “I’m very sorry.”

‘THE WHOLE TRUTH’

At an athletics facility in Moscow last month, Lysenko effortlessly cleared 2.15 metres – an impressive jump for someone who drives a truck for a living.

The athlete who cleared 2.32 m to win silver at the 2017 championships sits in traffic all day, running errands for a construction company in the Moscow region. Earlier in the pandemic, he worked as a food delivery courier.

Despite not having trained in months, Lysenko is still aiming to compete at the Olympics and break the world record of 2.45 m.

“I understand that there is a lot of work to do on my technique,” Lysenko said. “I’m not in the shape I used to be.”

Lysenko considered quitting his job to train full-time in the last year of his suspension but his financial situation has not allowed it.

“I need to find money to live, to buy food,” said Lysenko.

To compete internationally after his suspension, Lysenko would still need to be cleared by World Athletics.

 

President Vladimir Putin orders Sports Ministry to settle reinstatement issues with WADA

President Vladimir Putin ruled on Friday that the Russian Sports Ministry as well as all of the involved national sports organizations must resort to measures aimed at the reinstatement of the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) with WADA and of the All-Russian Athletics Federation (RusAF) with World Athletics.

The Russian Sports Ministry is now set to present a report regarding RUSADA’s reinstatement process before March 30, 2022 as well as a report on RusAF’s membership reinstatement progress before December 26, 2022. RUSADA-WADA case The Court of Arbitration for Sport in Switzerland’s Lausanne upheld on December 17, 2020 WADA’s (the World Anti-Doping Agency) previous ruling on a number of sanctions against Russian sports.

In particular, CAS upheld WADA’s decision to declare RUSADA as non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code. The court, however, ruled to cut the previously proposed four-year term of sanctions to the period of two years. The Swiss-based court said in a statement on December 17 that the CAS Panel “unanimously determined RUSADA to be non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC) in connection with its failure to procure the delivery of the authentic LIMS data (Laboratory Information Management System) and underlying analytical data of the former Moscow Laboratory to WADA” in the period between 2012 and 2015.

The Russian authorities deny accusations of manipulation. CAS held hearings on a legal debate between RUSADA and WADA in the period between November 2 and 5, 2020. Appointed judges in the CAS case between RUSADA and WADA were Mark Williams (Australia), Luigi Fumagalli (Italy) and Hamid Gharavi (France). According to the CAS decision as of December 17, 2020, Russian athletes were deprived of their right to participate in all World Championships, Olympic and Paralympic Games under the national flag of Russia for the two-year period.

The national anthem of Russia was also ruled out to be played at international sport tournaments in the course of the next two years, including at the upcoming Olympic Games in Japan this year. The ruling of the Swiss-based court also stripped Russia of the right to bid for the organization of all international sports tournaments for the period of two years.

WADA’s sanctions will be in force until December 2022. World Athletics and RusAF World Athletics suspended RusAF’s membership in November 2015, following a wave of anti-doping rules violations and formed a special mission on the issue. World Athletics, however, allowed clean athletes from Russia to participate in international tournaments under the neutral status or the Authorized Neutral Athlete (ANA) until the membership of the RusAF is reinstated.

The ANA status prohibits Russian athletes from participating in all international track and field tournaments under the national flag. The World Athletics Council announced on November 22, 2019 its decision to suspend RusAF’s reinstatement process based on charges brought by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU). According to World Athletics, the AIU charged RusAF on November 21, 2019 “with obstructing an investigation and provisionally suspended several senior federation officials for tampering and complicity.”

The provisionally suspended senior officials at that time were then-President of RusAF Dmitry Shlyakhtin and several more high-ranking people from the federation for helping to falsify documents, which Russian high jumper Danil Lysenko presented as his excuse for skipping doping tests. Shlyakhtin submitted his letter of resignation on November 23.

Source: tass.com

Russian Danil Lysenko stripped of neutral athlete status

Russian high jumper Danil Lysenko has been provisionally suspended and stripped of his status as a neutral athlete following breach of anti-doping regulations, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) said on Friday.

Russia was banned by the IAAF in 2015 following an independent World Anti-Doping Agency investigation into allegations, still denied by Moscow, of state-sponsored doping.

Some Russian athletes, however, were cleared to compete internationally by demonstrating to the IAAF that their training environment met the required anti-doping standards.

The Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) has charged and provisionally suspended Lysenko for the breaches.

“The decision… has been made as a result of Mr Lysenko’s failure to provide whereabouts information as required under the IAAF Anti-Doping Rules and Regulations and to make himself available for out-of-competition testing by the AIU,” the IAAF said in a statement.

Lysenko cannot compete at next week’s European Athletics Championships in Berlin, the governing body added.

The 21-year-old equalled the season’s best in high jump with a leap of 2.40 metres at the Monaco Diamond League meeting last month.

Competing as a neutral athlete, Lysenko also won gold at the world indoor championships in Birmingham by defeating Qatar’s Mutaz Essa Barshim, who beat him to top the world championships in London last year.

He was one of seven Russian athletes allowed by the IAAF to participate in Birmingham in March.

Sebastian Coe tells Russia: IAAF will still play hardball despite IOC decision

Sebastian Coe has promised athletics will continue to play hardball with Russia despite the International Olympic Committee’s decision to welcome the country back into the sporting fold.

Russia has been suspended from track and field since November 2015 because of massive state-sponsored doping, with its athletes needing to gain the approval of a doping review board to compete as neutral athletes.

Only 22 Russians have been granted approval for 2018 so far, with eight of those competing in the world indoor championships in Birmingham – including the high jumpers Mariya Lasitskene and Danil Lysenko, who both won gold in the women’s and men’s events on Thursday night.

And Lord Coe, the president of the IAAF, has signalled that the body’s tough stance will not soften until an independent taskforce, headed by the Norwegian Rune Andersen, is satisfied that Russia has cleaned up its act.

Russia’s Olympic membership restored by IOC after doping ban

“We have a responsibility to protect the clean athletes,” said Coe. “And until we are entirely satisfied Russian Athletics has met the objectives we have set – and agreed with them – then our position is not an unreasonable one to have.”

Andersen will give his latest report on Russia’s progress to the IAAF’s executive council on Tuesday. But there is little chance of a change in policy, given he has previously stated the suspension will not be lifted until the Russian Anti-Doping Agency is functioning again and the country’s sporting leaders acknowledge their mistakes.

Coe refused to comment directly on the IOC’s decision to reinstate the Russian Olympic Committee after just a three month suspension, but indicated he was happy for the IAAF to forge its own path on Russia.

“I can’t get into that, we have a very different system,” he said. “It’s different because it’s for the international federation to have the primacy over eligibility rules.

“The IOC accepted that before Rio. And they recognised the primacy of the IAAF to say: ‘No, we’re not satisfied this is a system which meets the criteria we have set ourselves.’ Russia will come back when that criteria is met and not before.”

Source:theguardian.com