Tag Archives: Dafne Schippers

Sifan Hassan crowned the 2021 European Athlete of the Year

Double Tokyo Olympics Games champion Sifan Hassan from the Netherlands has been crowned the 2021  European Woman Athlete of the Year at the Golden Tracks award ceremony that was held on Saturday (16) evening in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Hassan has been an outstanding performer this summer having won three medals that included the 5000m, 10,000m and 1500m bronze titles.

Hassan was crowned women’s European Athlete of the Year for the first time and she becomes just the second Dutch athlete to win this accolade after Dafne Schippers in 2014 and 2015.

Hassan – who was unfortunately not able to be present at the awards ceremony and Dutch federation President Eric van der Burg received her trophy on her behalf from European Athletics Vice President Cherry Alexander – won ahead of fellow Olympic champions Anita Wlodarczyk from Poland and Mariya Lasitskene, the latter being the 2019 European Athlete of the Year.

Hassan has also been in record-breaking form this season. She decimated Almaz Ayana’s world 10,000m record of 29:17.45 on home soil at the FBK Games in Hengelo in June with 29:06.82.

That mark was subsequently broken two days later on the same track by Letesenbet Gidey but Hassan outsprinted the Ethiopian for the Olympic 10,000m title, her sixth race in the Japanese capital after winning gold in the 5000m and then bronze in the 1500m.

It was a successful evening for Dutch athletics as European 400m hurdles record-holder Femke Bol was crowned women’s Rising Star.

Summary of Golden Tracks award winners 

  • Women’s European Athlete of the Year – Sifan Hassan (NED)
  • Men’s European Athlete of the Year – Karsten Warholm (NOR)
  • Women’s Rising Star – Femke Bol (NED)
  • Men’s Rising Star – Sasha Zhoya (FRA)
  • European Athletics Community Award – Maria Andrejczyk (POL)
  • European Athletics Women’s Leadership Award – Ana Krstevska (MKD)
  • Member Federation Award – Georgina Drumm (IRL)
  • European Athletics Coaching Award – Hansruedi Kunz (SUI)

 

Men’s and women’s European Athlete of the Year finalists announced

With 10 days until the Golden Tracks award ceremony takes place in Lausanne, Switzerland on 16 October, we can announce the three finalists for the men’s and women’s European Athlete of the Year.

The shortlist includes both the 2019 European Athletes of the Year Mariya Lasitskene and Karsten Warholm, both of whom won gold medals at the Tokyo Olympic Games and trophies in the Diamond League final in Zurich.

The shortlist was determined by a four-part voting process which incorporates votes from fans across social media, Member Federations, media and an expert European Athletics panel. Each section constituted 25 percent of the vote.

Sifan Hassan (The Netherlands)

Sifan Hassan almost pulled off the unthinkable feat of winning three individual gold medals at the same Olympics. Hassan won the 5000m and 10,000m titles but the Dutchwoman came up narrowly short in the 1500m, settling for bronze behind Faith Kipyegon and Laura Muir.

Hassan’s pre-Olympic campaign was highlighted by a world 10,000m record of 29:06.82 in Hengelo – a mark which was beaten on the same track only two days later by Letesenbet Gidey – and while her exploits in Tokyo had understandably caught up her, the seemingly indefitagle Hassan still finished her season with a flourish.

After winning over 5000m in Eugene, Hassan ran one of the fastest mile times in history in Brussels with 4:14.74 before finishing a close second to Kipyegon over 1500m in the Diamond League final in Zurich.

Mariya Lasitskene (Authorised Neutral Athlete / Russia)

Mariya Lasitskene has won multiple world and European titles both indoors and outdoors but an Olympic medal was conspicuously absent from her collection.

Still a junior at the time of the 2012 Olympics, Lasitskene missed out on selection for London and the blanket ban on Russian athletes meant Lasitskene was absent from the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

Troubled by a knee injury all season, Lasitskene only qualified for the final by virtue of a third-time clearance at 1.95m but the Russian showed her immense competitive mettle by clearing season’s best of 2.02m and then 2.04m to seal the title.

Lasitskene, who was the 2019 European Athlete of the Year, then went on to clear 2.05m in the Diamond League final in Zurich. Will she become just the second athlete after Dafne Schippers (2014-15) to win the award in back-to-back editions?

Anita Wlodarczyk (Poland)

Like Lasitskene, Anita Wlodarczyk was on the comeback trail from injury but the seasoned campaigner had timed her peak to perfection.

The world record-holder created history at the Olympic Games in Tokyo by becoming the first female athlete to win three successive gold medals in the same event, clinching a third gold medal in the hammer with a winning mark of 78.48m – her best mark in three years.

Armand Duplantis (Sweden)

His world record of 6.18m remains just beyond his reach for now but Armand Duplantis achieved a record for consistency at the highest level, clearing six metres or higher in no fewer than 12 competitions indoors and outdoors.

His indoor season was highlighted by a 6.10m clearance in Belgrade, a precursor to another title at the European Indoor Championships in Torun where he cleared 6.05m to take ownership of the championship record in the arena in which he broke the world record for the first time in 2020.

Duplantis suffered two unexpected losses outdoors but the American-based Swede won every significant competition including gold at the Olympic Games with 6.02m and the Diamond League final in Zurich with 6.06m.

Duplantis has previously been a winner at the Golden Tracks. He was named joint men’s Rising Star in 2018 alongside Norway’s Jakob Ingebrigtsen following their incredible exploits at the European Athletics Championships in Berlin.

Lamont Marcell Jacobs (Italy)

The men’s sprinting scene was thrust wide open this season and the vastly improving Lamont Marcell Jacobs duly filled this void with two scintillating performances in the 100m at the Tokyo Olympics.

Having broken the 10 second-barrier ahead of Tokyo, Jacobs eclipsed the European record with a 9.83 clocking in the semifinal before storming to gold in the final in 9.80. Further success came at the end of the championships as Jacobs ran the second leg of Italy’s gold medal-winning team in the 4x100m.

Jacobs gave notice of what was to come this summer by dominating the 60m at the European Athletics Indoor Championships in Torun where he won gold in a world lead of 6.47. He also caught the attention of eagle-eyed track fans with a scintillating 8.91 split at the World Relays in Silesia.

Karsten Warholm (Norway)

Karsten Warholm raced lightly in 2021 but his performances were of a stratospheric standard.

Warholm clinched the world record from Kevin Young, appropriately on home soil at the Bislett Games in Oslo with 46.70 but the Norwegian tore his record asunder at the Olympic Games in Tokyo where he broke through the 46 second-barrier with 45.94 – a respectable time even for the 400m flat!

For the third successive season, Warholm enjoyed an unbeaten campaign in the 400m hurdles. He also took notable wins in Monaco and Berlin as well as in Zurich at the Diamond League final.

At 25, Warholm is one of the few athletes to have won both the Rising Star award and the men’s European Athlete of the Year award. Will he win again in Lausanne?

Source: european-athletics.com

Ostrava 201:8Ta Lou gives Africa first Gold Medal

Marie-Josee Ta Lou gave Team Africa got her first gold medal in women 100m race m at the first day of the Continental Cup Ostrava 2018.

Ta Lou smashed the two super power continents of America’s and Europe that were led by Great Britain’s Dina Asher-Smith and Dafne Schippers.

Ta Lou took the two head on to romp home in 11:14 with Asher- Smiths coming in second in two seconds later with Schippers wrapping the podium first three finishes in 11:21

EUROPE NAMES TEAM FOR IAAF CONTINENTAL CUP OSTRAVA 2018

European Athletics has announced the European team for the IAAF Continental Cup Ostrava 2018 to be held on 8-9 September.

The team features several of the leading performers from the recent European Championships and includes the likes of triple European champion Dina Asher-Smith, European 1500m champion Jakob Ingebrigtsen, world 400m hurdles champion Karsten Warholm, world pole vault record-holder Renaud Lavillenie, world discus champion Andrius Gudzius, world and Olympic pole vault champion Katerina Stefanidi, world and Olympic discus champion Sandra Perkovic, world and Olympic hammer champion Anita Wlodarczyk and world 200m champions Ramil Guliyev and Dafne Schippers.

The team also includes four Czech stars who’ll be competing before their own fans at Ostrava’s Mestsky Stadium: shot putter Tomas Stanek, this year’s world indoor bronze medallist; Jakub Vadlejch, the 2017 world silver medallist in the javelin; European 1500m finalist Simona Vrzalova; and Nikola Ogrodnikova, the European javelin silver medallist.

Athletes will be aiming to collect team points, individual prize and a piece, quite literally, of the IAAF Continental Cup Ostrava 2018 trophy.

IAAF

EUROPEAN TEAM FOR OSTRAVA

MEN
100m: Jak Ali Harvey (TUR), Churandy Martina (NED)
200m: Ramil Guliyev (TUR), Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake (GBR)
400m: Kevin Borlee (BEL), Matthew Hudson-Smith (GBR)
800m: Andreas Kramer (SWE),  Michal Rozmys (POL)
1500m: Jakob Ingebrigtsen (NOR), Marcin Lewandsowski (POL)
3000m: Morhad Amdouni (FRA), Henrik Ingebrigtsen (NOR)
3000m steeplechase: Fernando Carro (ESP), Mahiedine Mekhissi (FRA)
110m hurdles: Pascal Martinot-Lagarde (FRA), Sergey Shubenkov (ANA)
400m hurdles: Yasmani Copello (TUR), Karsten Warholm (NOR)
High jump: Ilia Ivaniuk (ANA), Maksim Nedaskau (BLR)
Pole vault: Renaud Lavillenie (FRA), Timur Morgunov (ANA)
Long jump: Serhii Nykyforov (UKR), Miltiadis Tentoglou (GRE)
Triple jump: Nelson Evora (POR), Pablo Torrijos (ESP)
Shot put: Michal Haratyk (POL), Tomas Stanek (CZE)
Discus: Andrius Gudzius (LTU), Daniel Stahl (SWE)
Hammer: Bence Halasz (HUN), Wojciech Nowicki (POL)
Javelin: Thomas Rohler (GER), Jakub Vadlejch (CZE)
4x100m: Aykut Ay (TUR), Emre Zafer Barnes (TUR), Ramil Guliyev (TUR), Jak Ali Harvey (TUR), Yigitcan Hekimoglu (TUR), Izzet Safer (TUR)
Mixed 4x400m: Kevin Borlee (BEL), Matt Hudson-Smith (GBR)
Reserve: Ilya Shkurenov (ANA)

WOMEN
100m: Dina Asher-Smith (GBR), Dafne Schippers (NED)
200m: Ivet Lalova-Collio (BUL), Dafne Schippers (NED)
400m: Lisanne De Witte (NED), Justyna Swiety-Ersetic (POL)
800m: Natalia Pryshchepa (UKR), Anna Sabat (POL)
1500m: Sofia Ennaoui (POL), Simona Vrzalova (CZE)
3000m: Sifan Hassan (NED), Konstanze Klosterhalfen (GER)
3000m steeplechase: Anna Emilie Moller (DEN), Ophélie Claude-Boxberger (FRA)
100m hurdles: Pamela Dutkiewicz (GER), Elvira Herman (BLR)
400m hurdles: Meghan Beesley (GBR), Anna Ryzhkova (UKR)
High jump: Mirela Demireva (BUL), Maria Lasitskene (ANA)
Pole vault: Anzhelika Sidorova (ANA), Katerina Stefanidi (GRE)
Long jump: Malaika Mihambo (GER), Shara Proctor (GBR)
Triple jump: Kristin Gierisch (GER), Paraskevi Papahristou (GRE)
Shot put: Paulina Guba (POL), Christina Schwanitz (GER)
Discus: Nadine Muller (GER), Sandra Perkovic (CRO)
Hammer: Alexandra Tavernier (FRA), Anita Wlodarczyk (POL)
Javelin: Christin Hussong (GER), Nikola Ogrodnikova (CZE)
4x100m: Dina Asher-Smith (GBR), Kristal Awuah (GBR), Imani Lansiquot (GBR), Ashleigh Nelson (GBR), Bianca Williams (GBR)
Mixed 4x400m: Lisanne De Witte (NED), Justyna Swiety-Ersetic (POL)
Reserve: Katerina Cachova (CZE)

Dina Asher-Smith is the new Queen of British athletics

As of 8.46pm local time in Berlin on Saturday, British sprinting entered unchartered territory thanks to one woman.

Dina Asher-Smith is not just the greatest female sprinter Britain has ever produced. She is not just the queen of the European 100m and 200m, having destroyed everyone who dared stand in her path over five incredible days.

She is, without a shadow of a doubt, the best sprinter anywhere on the planet right now.

Sure, there is the caveat that it is not an Olympic or World Championship year and the Americans and Jamaicans therefore have no major competition to peak for. It is an argument not without logic. But, to be frank, it would probably not make the slightest bit of difference right now. Not the way Asher-Smith is running.

Based on what we have witnessed in Berlin over the past week, it is difficult to think of anyone in the world who could touch her at the moment.

The numbers speak for themselves. Her 10.85-second winning time from Tuesday put her top of this year’s 100m world rankings and the 21.89sec she ran on Saturday night did the same for 200m.

They would also have been good enough to win both world titles at last summer’s World Championships in London.

And all at the age of 22. It is impossible to imagine a future that does not end with Olympic and world podiums. She may yet become the first British woman in history to win a global sprint title.

“I have obliterated my own expectations,” she said, unable to grasp the enormity of her achievements in Berlin.

“I told myself loosely this year that I wanted to run a 10.8sec [for 100m] and I had a joke with my physio that if I ran a 10.85sec I would buy myself a cute necklace that I have been eyeing up that is a bit expensive.

“Then when I did it the other day I was like: ‘Oh no I might actually have to buy it’.

“Coming into the 200m I didn’t have a time in my head because I didn’t know how tired I would be and it is a bit cold. I just wanted to win.

“It was over in a blur and I am just full of happiness and relief. 21.89sec… I haven’t taken it. With the 10.85sec it is more than I could have asked for.”

Watching on from her vantage point above the finish line, the tears did not take long to flow for her mother Julie, who accompanies her daughter to all her races worldwide.

The Asher-Smith success story is a true family affair. Only earlier this year did Asher-Smith, fresh her university graduation, move out of the family home and begin grappling with such tedious things as council tax, bills and food shopping. “I’m just trying to be a grown up,” she said.

Even then, she has only moved 12 miles down the road – close enough for Julie and her father Winston to come round and help out with cooking when required.

As the self-proclaimed “master of understatement”, her coach John Blackie is not a man to be reduced to tears – he wryly greeted one of her numerous national records earlier this season with the verdict: “She has performed quite well.”

But even he was unable to ignore the magnitude of Asher-Smith’s feat on Saturday night, describing it as “stratospheric”.

Her achievements legitimately mean more to Blackie than most coaches. She was just nine years old when he first spotted her athletic ability on the track in Bromley, south London.

They have stuck together through thick and thin ever since – through national age group titles, world junior titles, European titles and now this.

Indeed there was a point not too long ago where it became apparent that she was too quick for the rest of the female sprinters in Blackie’s group, so he now throws her in with the men instead.

“I’m normally at the back because they’ve gone off and it’s my job to hunt them down,” she said.

“If I’m too far away John will nudge me and say: ‘You’ve got to keep up with them if you want to run the good times’.

“Even though I was able to [win gold in Berlin] and it might have looked good, that’s down to six days a week for however many weeks a year chasing the boys and letting them drag me round the track and kill me.”

It is a winning formula. Away from the track Asher-Smith will now undoubtedly become the brightest beacon for a sport that is forever having to fight for its worth in Britain – that rare person who punctures the wider conscious and extends beyond the athletics hardcore.

She will seize Jessica Ennis-Hill’s mantle as the darling of British athletics and serve as the figurehead for a new generation that has excelled at these European Championships.

And the most endearing thing of all is it she will to do so with that disbelieving smile on her face, continually achieving things she never thought herself capable of, repeatedly obliterating her expectations.

Source: telegraph.co.uk

 

Schippers and Hassan spearhead Dutch team for Berlin

Dafne Schippers and Sifan Hassan are the outstanding names on the 46-strong Dutch team for the Berlin 2018 European Athletics Championships from 7-12 August.

Schippers has been named in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m. She won an individual sprint double at the 2014 European Championships in Zurich and the 100m and 4x100m titles on home soil in Amsterdam 2016. Ahead of Berlin, the reigning two-time world 200m champion is ranked third in the 100m (11.01) and second in the 200m (22.34).

Hassan also won gold at the 2014 European Championships in the 1500m but this time, the Dutchwoman will step up and contest the 5000m. Hassan broke the European record with 14:22.34 in Rabat and moved to third on the world all-time mile lists with 4:14.71 in London on Sunday. Hassan was hoping to contest both the 1500m and 5000m but the timetable does not accommodate that combination of events.

Reigning European 100m champion Churandy Martina will also be contesting the 100m, 200m and 4x100m in Berlin and Anouk Vetter will be defending her heptathlon title. Nadine Visser is concentrating solely on the 100m hurdles in 2018.

With four gold medals – and eight in total – the Netherlands finished sixth on the medal table on home soil at the European Championships in Amsterdam two years ago.

Click here for the full Dutch team.

european-athletics.org

Obiri highlights the Kenyan onslaught at Doha Diamond League season opener

Women’s 3,000m race in the season-opening Doha Diamond League will see reigning world champion and Olympic silver medalist Hellen Obiri lead a strong Kenyan fields that includes 2013 World Youth Champion and 2014 World Junior 3000m silver medalist Lilian Kasait and fifth-place finisher at the 2017 World championships, Margaret Chelimo.

Reigning 1,500m world silver medalist and Olympic bronze medalist, Jenny Simpson of the USA, will move up to the longer distance in Doha and will provide a strong challenge for the Kenyans.

Obiri enjoyed an outstanding 2017 season, claiming the overall 5,000m Diamond League title in Brussels following victories in Shanghai and Rome, as well as winning the 3,000m race in Monaco. She also set a new meeting record over one mile at the Muller Anniversary Games in London.

However, 20-year-old team-mate, Rengeruk, has shown strong form already this season, winning team gold at the 2017 World Cross Country Championships in Uganda and taking individual bronze, proving the youngster is one-to-watch and setting up an exciting head-to-head in May. The race promises to be a real treat for Qatar’s large Kenyan community, who always come out in force to support their athletes.

Doha first staged a major athletics event in 1997 with the Doha Grand Prix, which was elevated to the Super Grand Prix in 2005. In 2010, Doha hosted the first-ever IAAF Diamond League fixture which has continued to grow in strength every year and provides an ideal opening to the outdoor season. The 2018 meeting will be the ninth consecutive edition.

The women’s 100m promises to be one of the highlights of the evening as reigning 100m Olympic champion Elaine Thompson of Jamaica will go head to head with reigning 200m World champion and Olympic silver medallist Dafne Schippers of The Netherlands, 2017 world silver medallist in the 100m and 200m, Marie-Josée Tao Lou of the Ivory Coast and fellow country-woman, 2018 World Indoor champion over 60m, Murielle Ahouré.

Elaine Thompson proved unbeatable in last year’s Diamond League series as she won every single race to be crowned 2017 Diamond League Champion.

She also became the first woman since Florence Griffith-Joyner at Seoul 1988 to do the sprint double at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

However, Thompson finished in a surprise fifth place at the London 2017 IAAF World Championships with Ta Lou, Schippers and Ahouré finishing ahead of her in silver, bronze and fourth positions respectively, ensuring a fascinating showdown at this year’s Doha Diamond League.

The Doha event will be followed by the Shangai round where World record-holder David Rudisha will hope to make it third time lucky in the men’s 800m after finishing fifth on his Shanghai debut in 2016 and third last year, while fellow Kenyan Timothy Cheruiyot begins the defence of his Diamond League trophy in the 1500m.

Other reigning IAAF Diamond League champions who will be looking for early points include Dalilah Muhammad in the women’s 400m hurdles and Maria Lasitskene, the world indoor and outdoor high jump champion.

Colombia’s Olympic champion Caterine Ibarguen is targeting a winning return to Shanghai after she won the women’s triple jump here in 2013 and 2015, as will Luvo Manyonga, the South African who leapt to an IAAF Diamond League and African record of 8.61m to take maximum points in the long jump last May before going to win the world title and Diamond trophy in August.

Manyonga will face China’s newly minted Asian indoor champion, Shi Yuhao.

Sam Kendricks, another of last year’s world and IAAF Diamond League champions, takes on the host nation’s World Championships fourth-place finisher, Xue Changrui, in the men’s pole vault. Like McLeod, Kendricks is seeking a Shanghai hat-trick after beating world record-holder Renaud Lavillenie with a vault of 5.88m 12 months ago.

source: the-star.co.ke

Rudisha headlines Shanghai Diamond League

Olympic 800m champion David Rudisha headlines a list of no fewer than 14 world and Olympic champions who are expected to grace the Shanghai Diamond League on May 12.

Rudisha, the world record holder over the distance will hope to make it third time lucky after finishing fifth on his Shanghai debut in 2016 and third last year.

Fellow Kenyan Timothy Cheruiyot will be hoping to start his Diamond League trophy defence on a the right foot when he parades in the 1500m race.

The stellar line-up includes eight gold medallists from the IAAF World Championships London 2017 and six athletes who struck gold at the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics, plus nine event winners from last year’s Diamond League and two newly crowned world indoor champions.

Kendra Harrison clinched her first global crown when she took the 60m hurdles title in Birmingham earlier this month, equalling the North American record of 7.70. The outdoor world record-holder will make her Shanghai debut in the 100m hurdles and will face Olympic champion Brianna McNeal (nee Rollins).

The Shanghai crowd will be treated to another tasty head-to-head in the women’s 200m in which two-time world champion Dafne Schippers takes on Olympic 400m champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo.

Schippers will be racing in Shanghai for the first time, while Miller-Uibo has fond memories of the city, having triumphed over 400m for the past two years. The Bahamian set an early world lead to take the Shanghai title in 2017 and went on to claim overall Diamond League trophies for both 200m and 400m, setting a national record of 21.88 in the half-lap final in Zurich when her Dutch rival was fourth.

In the men’s 100m China’s world indoor 60m silver medallist Su Bingtian will take on two world champions, Justin Gatlin and Ramil Guliyev. Su brought the crowd to its feet 12 months ago when he clinched his first ever IAAF Diamond League victory and the Chinese record-holder will be hoping for a repeat performance against the world 100m and 200m champions.

Botswana’s Diamond League champion Isaac Makwala will face world silver medallist Steven Gardiner in the 400m.

Omar McLeod will target a third successive Shanghai victory in the 110m hurdles when he takes on Spain’s Orlando Ortega. Jamaica’s world and Olympic champion broke the 13-second barrier when he triumphed here in 2016 before going on to claim the Olympic crown just ahead of Ortega.

Other reigning IAAF Diamond League champions who will be looking for early points include Dalilah Muhammad in the women’s 400m hurdles and Maria Lasitskene, the world indoor and outdoor high jump champion.

Colombia’s Olympic champion Caterine Ibarguen is targeting a winning return to Shanghai after she won the women’s triple jump here in 2013 and 2015, as will Luvo Manyonga, the South African who leapt to an IAAF Diamond League and African record of 8.61m to take maximum points in the long jump last May before going to win the world title and Diamond trophy in August. Manyonga will face China’s newly minted Asian indoor champion, Shi Yuhao.

Sam Kendricks, another of last year’s world and IAAF Diamond League champions, takes on the host nation’s World Championships fourth-place finisher, Xue Changrui, in the men’s pole vault. Like McLeod, Kendricks is seeking a Shanghai hat-trick after beating world record-holder Renaud Lavillenie with a vault of 5.88m 12 months ago.

Chinese stars will also feature heavily in the women’s throws, not least world and IAAF Diamond League champion Gong Lijiao, who hopes to repeat her season-boosting shot put victory from 12 months ago. Asian record-holder and world bronze medallist Lyu Huihui will also have high hopes in the javelin. More big names will be announced in the next few weeks.