Tag Archives: Chicago Marathon

Ruth Chepngetich wins the Chicago Marathon in style

World Marathon champion Ruth Chepngetich took the lead and never looked back at honors at the 43rd Edition of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon that was held on Sunday (10) in Chicago.

Chepngetich who took charge of the marathon when he dropped off his pacer earlierthan anticipated surge ahead cutting the tape in 2:22.31

The Kenyan was followed by three Americans who had a big day in off. Emma Bates came in second in 2:24.20 with Sara Hall closing the first three podium finishes in 2:27.19.

Keira D’Amato finished in fourth in 2:28.22 with Vivian Kiplagat from Kenya finishing in fifth place.

Seifu Tura wins the 2021 Chicago Marathon

Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura took the top honors at the 43rd Edition of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon that was held on Sunday (10) in Chicago.

Seifu who finished sixth in 2019, Tura came back in a huge way at the 2021 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, beating out former champion Galen Rupp to claim his first major marathon victory. Tura, of Ethiopia, set a personal best in Milan, 2:04.29, earlier this year when he finished in fourth place.

The Ethiopian crossed the line in 2:04.29 with Rupp coming in second in 2:06.12.

This is the the third marathon victory for this young star and the first one at a the World Majors race.

Kenya’s Erick Kiptanui who was part of the thrilling three-man breakout pack, including Rupp and Tura that jostled for positions in the final quarter of the race, was forced to finish in third place after crossing the line 2:06.51

Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich target Chicago Marathon crowns

Kenya’s Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich head the fields for the Bank of America Chicago Marathon on Sunday (10), with Sara Hall and Galen Rupp leading US hopes at the World Athletics Elite Platinum Label road race.

After action in Berlin and London in recent weeks, Chicago is the next race in a busy period of major marathons and the Boston event follows just one day later. The weather in Chicago looks set to be warm, with temperatures of around 21°C expected for the start of the elite races at 7:30am local time.

The last edition of the Chicago Marathon in 2019 saw a world record fall as Kenya’s Brigid Kosgei clocked 2:14:04 to take 81 seconds from Paula Radcliffe’s 2003 mark. This time her compatriots Chepngetich, who won the 2019 world title, and Vivian Kiplagat are among the athletes in the spotlight.

Chepngetich sits fourth on the women’s marathon all-time list thanks to the 2:17:08 PB she set when winning in Dubai in 2019 and she ran a world half marathon record in Istanbul in April with 1:04:02. The 27-year-old was unable to finish the Olympic marathon in Tokyo but is looking forward to her US debut race in Chicago.

“I have never raced in the States and making my debut in such a great race like the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is more than a dream to me,” she said. “I will give all myself trying to run as fast as possible.”

Hall will be among those looking to challenge her. The US athlete beat Chepngetich at last year’s London Marathon, as the pair finished second and third respectively behind Kosgei, and Hall went on to run a PB of 2:20:32 in Arizona a couple of months later. Now she has her eye on Deena Kastor’s 2:19:36 US record, should the conditions allow.

“When I thought about where I wanted to chase the American record, I thought it would be more exciting to do it at home, in the US, and Chicago is such an epic race,” she said.

The other sub-2:25 women in the field are Kiplagat, the USA’s Keira D’Amato and Ethiopia’s Meseret Belete. Kiplagat, who ran her marathon PB of 2:21:11 in 2019, clocked 2:39:18 in Eldoret in June but showed her current form with a personal best performance in the half marathon of 1:06:07 in Copenhagen last month. Like Hall, D’Amato also ran a PB in Arizona in December, clocking 2:22:56, while 22-year-old Belete – who was sixth at the 2018 World Half Marathon Championships and ran a world U20 best of 1:07:51 later that year – has a marathon PB of 2:24:54 set when finishing fourth in Houston last year.

Among those joining them on the start line will be the USA’s Emma Bates, Diane Nukuri and Lindsay Flanagan.

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat With his PB of 2:03:55 set at the Milan Marathon in May, Kipyego goes into the Chicago race as the second fastest man in 2021. The 25-year-old made his marathon debut in Buenos Aires in 2019, clocking 2:05:18, and later that year he improved to 2:04:40 to win in Abu Dhabi, despite having started the race as a pacemaker. He also seems unfazed by the warmer than expected temperatures, simply replying: ‘No problem’ at the pre-race press conference when asked about the weather.

Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura, meanwhile, explained how he is not as comfortable in the heat but he will go into the race looking to build on the 2:04:29 PB he set when finishing fourth in that same Milan Marathon in May. He also has experience of the Chicago event, having finished sixth in 2019 in 2:08:35.

Rupp leads US hopes as the 2016 Olympic bronze medallist returns to action after his eighth place in the Tokyo Olympic marathon nine weeks ago and third-place finish in the Great North Run half marathon in 1:01:52 last month. Eighth fastest among the entries, his PB of 2:06:07 was set in Prague in 2018 but he will be looking to regain the crown he claimed in 2017.

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba is also a former Chicago winner, having triumphed in 2015, and he set his PB of 2:04:32 in the same city the year before that. The fourth sub-2:05 runner in the field is Kengo Suzuki, who broke the Japanese record with his 2:04:56 to win the Lake Biwa Marathon in February.

Kenya’s Eric Kiptanui is also one to watch. Having helped to pace world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge in the past, the 58:42 half marathon runner made his own marathon debut last year and improved to 2:05:47 to win in Siena in April. “I was so happy to run 2:06 for my first marathon,” he told NN Running Team. “What it proved to me was, yes, I was in good shape but that I had the mentality to perform over the marathon distance.” Looking ahead to Chicago, he added: “I aim to run 2:03/2:04 but my first priority is to win the race.”

Ethiopia’s Chalu Deso and Shifera Tamru have respective bests of 2:04:53 and 2:05:18, while Ian Butler, who is coached by former world record-holder Steve Jones and balances his running with his job as a teacher, is the second-fastest US runner in the field with a PB of 2:09:45 set in Arizona last year.

Galen Rupp ready for Chicago marathon

Galen Rupp may have missed out on a medal at the Tokyo Olympics but the American said on Friday that despite a short turnaround he has had a great recovery and is raring to get to the start line for this weekend’s Chicago Marathon.

Rupp, who in 2017 became the first American-born male to win the Chicago Marathon in 35 years, placed eighth at the Olympics where some major names dropped out amid humid conditions but said his coach Mike Smith has him ready for Sunday.

“I’ve actually recovered great,” Rupp, 35, told reporters. “Obviously we knew it was going to be a quick turnaround coming here so soon after the Olympics, but it’s always nice when it’s something that you’ve been planning for.

“I knew I was going to come here well in advance before the Olympics and I think Mike and I sat down and before we committed, (we) really talked about what are the pros and cons of doing this.”

Rupp last competed in the Chicago Marathon in 2019 where, after recovering from Achilles surgery and in his first race of any distance in a year, he dropped out just before the 23-mile mark with calf strain.

After Tokyo, Rupp said Smith wanted him to take a short break from intense workouts so he could reset, clear his mind and spend time at home with family before resuming training.

“I took a week pretty easy right after the Olympics, didn’t do any workouts, just ran super slow. Mike literally said ‘think about your grandma running with you,'” said Rupp, who won a bronze medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

“It’s just about moving your legs and getting out there and that’s going to help flush out a lot of junk that comes from running a marathon.”

After the second week, Rupp was nearly fully recovered and so increased his volume and added moderate workouts to the mix. In the third week post-Olympics he picked up the intensity and has been hitting it hard ever since.

Rupp now hopes a return to a course where he has enjoyed success will help him to put the disappointment of his Tokyo Olympics result behind him.

“I would say the last six weeks have been better than really anything I did before the Olympics,” said Rupp. “You’re never sure how it’s going to go coming off of a marathon like that but it’s actually been a really good build-up for Chicago here.

“I’m pumped to be racing again on Sunday, especially after having a little disappointing race in the Olympics.”

14 Elite athletes withdraw from the Chicago Marathon

The race organizers 43rd edition of the Chicago Marathon has announced significant changes to their elite field.

Fourteen (14) elite athletes have withdrawn while seventeen elite athletes (17) have been added.

Among those who have withdrawn in the men category include Getaneh Molla from Ethiopia who holds a personal best of 2:03.34, Bahrain’s Hassan El Abbassi of 2:04.43, Kenya’s Joel Kimurer who has a personal best of 2:05.19, Laban Korir of 2:05.54, and Masato Kikuchi of 2:07.20 from Japan.

The top women elites who have withdrawn are Mexico’s Vianney De La Rosa who has a personal best of 2:20.04 and Britain’s Rosie Edwards of pb 2:31.56.

The oraganisers have now included Kenya’s Dickson Chumba who has appeared on the Chicago podium three times including a victory in 2015 and he holds a personal best of 2:04.32.

The fastest man that has been included in this field is Reuben Kipyego from Kenya who comes to this race with 2:03.55 that he got early this year at the Generali Milano Marathon, where he finished in second place.

Kenya’s Eric Kiptanui—also known as “captain of the pacemakers” and “kingmaker” for his work leading a team of 41 pacemakers to help teammate Eliud Kipchoge run a blistering 1:59.40 marathon in Vienna in –2019—enters this year’s Bank of America Chicago Marathon with a fresh personal best, 2:05:47.

Japan’s nation’s national marathon record holder, Kengo Suzuki of who holds a personal best of 2:04.56  and Ethiopia’s Chalu Deso of pb 2:04.53 who finished sixth at the Valencia Marathon in 2020 have also been included.

The women elite side, Vivian Kiplagat comes with a personal best of 2:21.11 with Ethiopia’s Meseret Belete who holds a pb of 2:24.54 and Americans Carrie Dimoff and Maegan Krifchin both with personal best of 2:31.12 and 2:33.14respectively have joined the race.

The top runners will receive USD 55,000, down from USD 100,000 in 2019 when the race was last contested. The winning wheelchair athletes will receive $20,000, and the top American runners will get $15,000 (equal to 2019). Although the event has a history of fast times, organizers are not offering any publicly-reported time bonuses this year.

Kenyans Brigid Kosgei and Lawrence Cherono, who are the reigning champion will not be racing this year. Kosgei who set a world record of 2:14.04 when she won the 2019 edition, ran the Virgin Money London Marathon last Sunday and finished fourth. She also won the silver medal at the Olympic Marathon in Sapporo last August. Cherono, finished fourth at the Olympic Marathon and has not been announced for a fall marathon.

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Chicago Marathon participants MUST have COVID-19 vaccination Certificate

Chicago Marathon organisers have made it a must for participants at the 43rd edition to provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative test to be able to participate at the event on 10, October 21.

The 2021 Chicago Marathon, which was cancelled last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has made the organizers to publish new updated COVID-19 guidelines.

Around 35,000 people have registered for the 2021 Chicago Marathon, which was cancelled last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Registered participants are required to provide proof of a complete COVID-19 vaccination series or a negative COVID-19 test result to participate in the 2021 Bank of America Chicago Marathon,” organisers said.

“Registered participants who are not fully vaccinated are required to provide a negative COVID-19 test result for a test administered within 72 hours of attending the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

“The event defines ‘fully vaccinated’ as individuals who are two weeks after their second dose in a two-dose vaccine series or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine.

“Proof of vaccination (hard copy, photocopy or digital version of an immunization record) or a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of attending the event is required for entrance to the Abbott Health & Fitness Expo.

“Individuals unable to prove full vaccination or negative test will be barred from entering the Health and Fitness Expo and unable to pick up the necessary race materials that allow for participation in the event.”

Organisers say RT-PCR, RT-LAMP, lateral flow, and rapid antigen tests are approved.

Attendees will be required to wear face coverings while at indoor event venues, while participants are encouraged to wear face coverings in Grant Park prior to starting the race.

World Marathon champion Ruth Chepngetich, who dropped out of the Olympic marathon at around 30 km, will make her Chicago Marathon debut. Sarah Hall ousted Chepngetich in a sprint for second place at the 2020 London Marathon, but all eyes will be on their rematch. Chepngetich is the only East African runner in an elite field that’s deep with American talent.

Other top notch elites on the list include Getaneh Molla and Seifu Tura from Ethiopia, Keira D’Amato (USA), and Emma Bates (USA).

Erick Kiptanui and Galen Rupp withdraws from Copenhagen Half Marathon

Kenya’s Erick Kiptanui has withdrawn from the 4th edition of the Copenhagen Half Marathon that will be held on Sunday (16)  in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Kiptanui took the world with surprise when he ran the fifth fastest time in 2018 and equaled the fifth in the all-time performances for the distance.

The 28 year-old won the Berlin Half Marathon which was his third time that he was running in a half marathon with amazing splits of 5K – 13:32; 10K – 27:32; 15K– 41:38, to beat the former world marathon record holder Patrick Makau’s course record of 58:56.

Kiptanui who was short of 19 seconds of the current world record and a mere two seconds from the fastest half marathon time in seven years had vowed to bring down the course record come Sunday, “I’m coming to Copenhagen to set a new world record,” said the confident Kiptanui.

Another big name to drop out of the CPH is Galen Rupp, an Olympic marathon bronze medalist who has withdrawn his name to concentrate of defending his Chicago Marathon. title which he can use event as part of his preparations

In the women’s race World half marathon champion, Netsanet Gudeta from Ethiopia has withdrawn due to an injury she got in training while Jordan Hasay who finished third at last year’s Chicago Marathon is also preparing for the same race.

 

Mo Farah bids to create Great North Run history

Four years ago when Sir Mo Farah won the first of his four consecutive Great North Run titles he admitted he was still consumed with fear over what life on the road would bring.

Farah was still two years away from calling time on his glittering track career and remained unsure whether he was entirely cut out to translate that success to the world of elite marathon running.

But the 35-year-old returns to Newcastle on Sunday battle-hardened from two full years of mixing it with the world’s best distance runners – and intent on using the race to pave the way to glory over the longer distance.

Victory this weekend will make Farah the first man to win the Great North Run five times, and deliver the ideal preparations for his appearance next month at the Chicago Marathon.

Farah said: “I’m still learning and understanding more and I’m not afraid to mix it in. In 2014, I was afraid to mix it because it was their territory and I was a track runner. But now I’m not afraid of anything.

“It’s a totally different challenge and I’m enjoying every day of it. My goal is to win a major marathon. For a track runner the highlight is the Olympics, and in the marathon the biggest thing you can do is win a major race.”

This year’s Great North Run presents a different dimension for Farah, who admitted his previous victories in the race have signalled the end of the season and a rare opportunity to binge-eat sticky toffee pudding.

Farah, who has run the London Marathon twice, coming third in April, is closing in on his latest career goal and has not under-estimated the importance of making history in the process on Tyneside.

“My aim (in Newcastle) is to run a decent time – I’ve still got another week from this point so it will be a good test for me on Sunday to see where I am and what I can do,” said Farah.

“I’ve never gone into this race having had this amount of training. I’ve always gone into it thinking – ‘Great North Run, finish, sticky toffee pudding’.

“But after this it’s straight back to my training camp in Flagstaff to prepare for Chicago. Hopefully I will get the job done and there will be a lot of stuff to take back. Doing that as the first five-time winner would be amazing.”

Farah’s biggest challenge is likely to come from Kenya’s Daniel Wanjiru, winner of the 2017 London Marathon. Vivian Cheruiyot and Joyciline Jepkosgei are favourites for the women’s race.

Source: standard.co.uk

Rupp Threatens Kwemoi’s CZ Tilburg Title Defence

Commonwealth Games 10,000m bronze medalist Rodgers Kwemoi will put his title on the line as he faces Boston Marathon champion USA’s Galen Rupp in the CZ Tillburg Ten Miles on September 2nd in the Netherlands.

The duo will be running the Tiburg Ten Miles where Haile Gebrselassie ran the world record there in 2005, in the city in the south of The Netherlands clocking 44:24.

Kwemoi who won the event in 2016 and 2017 will eyeing a third consecutive win as he battles the American runner who threatens his stranglehold in the race.

The Kenyan who won a gold medal in 10,000m at the World under 20 in the northern Polish city of Bydgoszcz posted a winning time of 45:03 last year.

Rupp, an Olympic marathon bronze medalist will be competing in the road race a month before he defends the Chicago Marathon title which he can use event as part of his preparations.

Tilburg Ten Miles is just over a month before the Rupp takes to the streets of Chicago to defend his 2017 victory.

So far this year, Rupp Boston marathon silver medalist has competed in four races. He first ran an indoor 5,000 meters at Washington in January.

He then won the Roma-Ostia Half Marathon, running 59:47, in March.

Rupp began the 2018 Boston Marathon on a sour note, when hoping to improve on his runner-up finish from 2017.

However, the cold and wet weather caused him breathing problems and forced him to drop out in the middle of the race.

The CZ Tilburg Ten Miles is the fastest 10 mile race in the world. The course is IAAF certified and there are top times.

The most popular part of the CZ Tilburg Ten Miles is the competition and recreation run over 10 English miles 16,092 meters.

 

Kirui, Karoki relish Chicago marathon challenge in battle against Farah

Kenyan runners Geoffrey Kirui and Bedan Karoki may not be the top names at the Chicago marathon, but the duo are holding their cards close to their chest as they plot a surprise show on Oct 7.

Kirui, the 2017 Boston marathon champion, was pushed to second position in defense of his title in April while Karoki, who had finished third in last year’s London race, was fifth in the English capital clocking 2:08:34.

Now the two are relishing challenging the status quo in Chicago, albeit from an obscure position.

“The pressure is no longer on me like was the case in London. I can relax and focus on running my own race and leave the top names to choke each other out,” Wanjiru said on Tuesday from his training base in Eldoret.

Organizers have assembled together at least 11 men who have run two hours and seven minutes or faster, including past champions Abel Kirui and Dickson Chumba.

They will face off against Britain’s Mo Farah, Kenneth Kipkemoi, Paul Lonyangata, Kirui, Karoki, Stephen Sambu and Augustine Choge.

“We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski.

“This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago,” he added.

Karoki, a two-time Olympian in the 10,000m, is an exciting athlete who made his marathon debut in 2017.

Prior to jumping to the marathon, he spent nearly a decade polishing his speed on the track, representing Kenya three times in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships.

“I still need to learn more in marathon. But I have high hopes of doing well in Chicago. Training is going on well with no injury concerns,” said Karoki.

Kipkemoi boasts the 25th fastest time in history over the half marathon distance, 59:01, and he started 2018 with a successful marathon debut, running 2:05:44 to win the Rotterdam Marathon.

On the other hand, Lonyangata missed a spot in the top three in Chicago in 2016, coming home in fourth after enduring uneven pace swings.

He set his personal best, 2:06:10, while winning the 2017 Paris Marathon, and he welcomed 2018 by becoming the first back-to-back winner of the Paris Marathon in nearly two decades.

However, Kirui experienced a significant career breakthrough when he won the laurel wreath at the 2017 Boston Marathon, shaking off American Galen Rupp to victory.

That win set him up for the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships, where he was eighth.

Kirui returned to Boston in to defend his title in April, but he failed to match the strides of a hard charging Yuki Kawauchi and he was forced to settle for second.

October marks Kirui’s second attempt in Chicago, where he had made his marathon debut in 2014, but he dropped out of the race.

Source: xinhuanet.com