Tag Archives: Caroline Rotich

Edna Kiplagat leads the elite field at Boston Marathon

The 2017 Boston marathon winner Edna Kiplagat from Kenya who is now based in United States will lead the women elite field at the 125th Boston Marathon that will be held from Hopkinton to Boston on Monday, October 11 in Boston.

This will be the first-ever fall edition of the Boston Marathon which will feature more than 140 elite athletes across all divisions including dozens of Americans, the Boston Athletic Association and John Hancock Financial jointly announced today.

The Organizers of the world’s oldest marathon, which could not be held as an in-person event in 2020 due to the pandemic and the local authorities, have permitted a field of 20,000 runners, and up to 70,000 more will run a virtual edition of the race. An $876,500 prize money purse will be on offer, the second largest in the history of the race.

Tom Grilk who is the B.A.A. president and CEO said, “In October, many of the world’s best athletes will look to etch their names in the history books by winning the Boston Marathon, We very much look forward to October’s competition, bringing together winners from more than one hundred global marathons. The B.A.A. is eager to continue the tradition of athletic excellence as we return to the roads leading to Boston.”

As usual the elite field in the open divisions is dominated by Africans. On the women’s side, eight international athletes have run sub-2:22 during their careers led by Ethiopia’s Yebrgual Melese (2:19:36), Mare Dibaba (2:19:52), Workenesh Edesa (2:20:24), Sutume Kebede (2:20:30), and Sutume Kebede (2:20:30). The top Kenyans are Kiplagat, the 2017 women’s race champion (2:19:50), and Helah Kiprop (2:21:27). Caroline Chepkoech, a former Kenyan who now runs for Kazakhstan, is making her debut.

The top American women are Jordan Hasay (2:20:57), Des Linden (2:22:38), and Molly Huddle (2:26:33). Hasay made her marathon debut at Boston in 2017, finishing third in 2:23:00. Linden has run Boston seven times and won the wet, cold and windy edition in 2018 (she was also second in 2011). Like Linden, Huddle ran Boston in 2018 and finished 13th. Ten of the 27 elite women who started that year dropped out.

The two defending champions, Kenya’s Lawrence Cherono and Ethiopia’s Worknesh Degefa, are not in this year’s elite field.

 OPEN DIVISIONS
 International Women:

Yebrgual Melese   (ETH), 2:19:36

Edna Kiplagat        (KEN), 2:19:50

Mare Dibaba          (ETH), 2:19:52

Workenesh Edesa (ETH), 2:20:24

Sutume Kebede    (ETH),  2:20:30

Besu Sado             (ETH), 2:21:03

Helah Kiprop         (KEN), 2:21:27

Bedatu Hirpa         (ETH), 2:21:32

Atsede Baysa        (ETH), 2:22:03

Diana Chemtai      (KEN), 2:22:06

Biruktayit Eshetu   (ETH), 2:22:40

Tigist Abayechew  (ETH), 2:22:45

Purity Changwony (KEN), 2:22:46

Caroline Rotich          (KEN), 2:23:22

Mary Ngugi                (KEN), 2:27:36

Shiho Kaneshige       (JPN),  2:28:51

Netsanet Gudeta        (ETH), 2:29:15

Kellys Arias                (COL), 2:29:36

Tish Jones                 (GBR), 2:31:00

Brittany Moran        (CAN), 2:36:22

Marie-Ange Brumelot (FRA), 2:36:23

Caroline Chepkoech    (KAZ), Debut (1:05:07 Half)

Monicah Ngige             (KEN), Debut (1:07:29 Half)

 

 

 

 

Wacera lifts B.A.A. 10K Race title

Kenya’s Mary Wacera took top honors at t5he 8th edition of the B.A.A. 10K race that was held on Sunday (24) in Boston.

The 29 year-old faced one of the strongest fields in its eight-year history, bringing together Boston Marathon champions, Olympians, and global medalists on the roads of Boston.

Des Linden returns to the roads of Boston for her B.A.A. 10K debut. Linden became the first American woman since 1985 to win the open division at the Boston Marathon. A two-time Olympian, Linden will look to become the first woman to win both the Boston Marathon and the B.A.A. 10K in the same year since 2011. In addition to Linden, Buzunesh Deba, and Caroline Rotich and 2018 Paris Marathon women champion Betsy Saina was also on start line up.

Other notable figures are Ethiopians Mamitu Daska, two-time B.A.A. 5K winner Buze Diriba were also aiming for a first B.A.A. 10K crown.

Olympic silver medalist Sally Kipyego, and road racing ace Lineth Chepkurui were also on the battle front.

Wacera maintained her calm as she also faced stiff challenge but manage to give a powerful kick that enabled her her to out run Rotich cutting the tape in 31:55 with Rotcih crossing the line two seconds later to take second place.

Ethiopian Daska closed the top three podium finish in 31:59.

Diriba and Monicah Ngige took fourth and fifth place in 32:09 and 32:30.

Saina and Kipyego finished distant seventh and tenth place in 33:06 and 34:31

LEADING RESULTS
WOMEN

  1. Mary Wacera      (KEN) 31:55
  2. Caroline Rotich  (KEN) 31:57
  3. Mamitu Daska    (ETH) 31:59
  4. Buze Diriba        (ETH) 32:09
  5. Monicah Ngige   (KEN) 32:30

 

Kirui and Rupp renew Boston Marathon duel

U.S. Olympic bronze medallist Galen Rupp lost to Kirui by 21 seconds in the 2017 race and is back while New York City Marathon champion – and home state favourite – Shalane Flanagan headlines a group of four top U.S. women’s contenders.

Rain and temperatures in the 50s (13 C) after an icy weekend are forecast, making for a messy race day.

That could be a factor, especially for the African athletes.

No American man has won in Boston since 1983, and Kirui, former champions Lelisa Desisa and Lemi Berhanu of Ethiopia, Ethiopian Tamirat Tola, the fastest in the field at 2:04.06, and Kenyan dark horse Nobert Kigen are aiming to keep it that way.

Yet many believe Chicago Marathon winner Rupp will have a say.

“Galen will definitely be much harder to beat than last year, regardless of how the race plays out,” Alberto Salazar, his coach and a former Boston champion, told reporters.

“But Kirui or the others may also be in better shape than last year, so it’s impossible to predict.”

The final few miles proved costly in 2017 to Rupp, who admitted afterwards: “I just did not have it over those last three or four miles.”

Kirui, 25, backed up his Boston win, his first victory in a marathon, by taking the 2017 world championship title. He carries a personal best of 2:06:27 to Rupp’s 2:09:20.

The U.S. women’s drought at Boston stretches back to 1985.

Flanagan, Jordan Hasay, Molly Huddle and Desi Linden will try to change that against an international field that may not be as strong as in past years.

Flanagan, 36, who grew up in Massachusetts, is the sentimental favourite, with Hasay holding the best Boston finish.

The 26-year-old made it to the podium in 2017, finishing third at both Boston and Chicago. The Boston race was her marathon debut.

Linden and Huddle are both experienced marathoners with Linden fourth in Boston in 2017 and Huddle third in the 2016 New York City Marathon.

Kiplagat, the Kenyan mother of five who is now 38, returns to defend her title after finishing second in the world championships and fourth in New York City in 2017.

Aselefech Mergia, a former London winner, and fellow Ethiopian Mamitu Daska, who was third in New York last year, could be Kiplagat’s biggest international challengers along with former Boston winners Buzunesh Deba (Ethiopia) and Caroline Rotich (Kenya).