Tag Archives: Carey Pinkowski

Kirui, Karoki relish Chicago marathon challenge in battle against Farah

Kenyan runners Geoffrey Kirui and Bedan Karoki may not be the top names at the Chicago marathon, but the duo are holding their cards close to their chest as they plot a surprise show on Oct 7.

Kirui, the 2017 Boston marathon champion, was pushed to second position in defense of his title in April while Karoki, who had finished third in last year’s London race, was fifth in the English capital clocking 2:08:34.

Now the two are relishing challenging the status quo in Chicago, albeit from an obscure position.

“The pressure is no longer on me like was the case in London. I can relax and focus on running my own race and leave the top names to choke each other out,” Wanjiru said on Tuesday from his training base in Eldoret.

Organizers have assembled together at least 11 men who have run two hours and seven minutes or faster, including past champions Abel Kirui and Dickson Chumba.

They will face off against Britain’s Mo Farah, Kenneth Kipkemoi, Paul Lonyangata, Kirui, Karoki, Stephen Sambu and Augustine Choge.

“We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski.

“This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago,” he added.

Karoki, a two-time Olympian in the 10,000m, is an exciting athlete who made his marathon debut in 2017.

Prior to jumping to the marathon, he spent nearly a decade polishing his speed on the track, representing Kenya three times in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships.

“I still need to learn more in marathon. But I have high hopes of doing well in Chicago. Training is going on well with no injury concerns,” said Karoki.

Kipkemoi boasts the 25th fastest time in history over the half marathon distance, 59:01, and he started 2018 with a successful marathon debut, running 2:05:44 to win the Rotterdam Marathon.

On the other hand, Lonyangata missed a spot in the top three in Chicago in 2016, coming home in fourth after enduring uneven pace swings.

He set his personal best, 2:06:10, while winning the 2017 Paris Marathon, and he welcomed 2018 by becoming the first back-to-back winner of the Paris Marathon in nearly two decades.

However, Kirui experienced a significant career breakthrough when he won the laurel wreath at the 2017 Boston Marathon, shaking off American Galen Rupp to victory.

That win set him up for the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships, where he was eighth.

Kirui returned to Boston in to defend his title in April, but he failed to match the strides of a hard charging Yuki Kawauchi and he was forced to settle for second.

October marks Kirui’s second attempt in Chicago, where he had made his marathon debut in 2014, but he dropped out of the race.

Source: xinhuanet.com

Kawauchi and Osako join Chicago Marathon field

Organisers of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon have announced that Boston Marathon champion Yuki Kawauchi and Japanese 5000m record-holder Suguru Osako will join the elite field for the IAAF Gold Label road race on 7 October.

They will both seek to become the first Chicago Marathon champion from Japan since Toshihiko Seko took the crown in 1986.

“Yuki and Suguru are exciting additions to our elite field,” said executive race director Carey Pinkowski. “Yuki has taken an unconventional path to marathon stardom; there’s no other elite runner competing today like him. And Suguru is young in his marathon career with a real chance at breaking the Japanese record in Chicago.”

Before becoming the Boston Marathon champion earlier this year amid freezing temperatures and pouring rain (where he said, “for me, these are the best conditions possible”), Kawauchi gained global recognition for his prolific racing schedule. He holds the record for the most marathons run within 2:20 (79), he boasts a PB of 2:08:14, he has won more than 30 career marathons and he finished 12 marathons in 2017 alone.

He has raced more than 20 times so far in 2018, including running the Kuki Half Marathon dressed in a panda suit and setting a course record at the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71km ultramarathon in May.

Compatriot Osako, who is based in Oregon, is the Japanese record-holder in the 3000m and 5000m. He competed in the 5000m and 10,000m at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio and made his marathon debut at the 2017 Boston Marathon, finishing third in 2:10:28. At the time, he was the first Japanese man to make it on to the podium in Boston since Seko’s 1987 victory. He ended 2017 with a 2:07:19 PB to finish third at the Fukuoka Marathon.

Osako hopes to secure an additional bonus in Chicago by breaking the Japanese marathon record of 2:06:11. If he manages that feat, the Japanese Corporate Track and Field Federation will pay him a 100-million-yen bonus.

“I want to try to break the national record, but the most important thing to me is to be competitive with the other runners,” said Osako. “I’m really excited and proud to run with Mo and Galen. I’m going to enjoy the challenge.”

Japan has a long history of producing some of the world’s best marathon runners, stretching back to the post-war era of the 1940s and 1950s. Japan dominated the global scene in the 1960s (in 1966 alone, 15 of the top 17 marathon times belonged to Japanese runners). As Tokyo looks ahead to hosting the 2020 Olympics, it hopes to see its marathon runners – like Osako – back in the medal count.

Kawauchi and Osako will be joined in Chicago by fellow Japanese runners Ryo Kiname, Chihiro Miyawaki, Tsukasa Koyama, Taku Fujimoto and Yohei Suzuki.

Mo Farah to battle Galen Rupp at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that four-time Olympic gold medalist, six-time world champion and five-time European champion Mo Farah will join the 2018 Chicago Marathon elite competition.

In 2012, Farah became the first British athlete in history to win an Olympic gold at the 10,000m, and he is just the second athlete in history to pull off back-to-back gold medals in both the 5000m and 10,000m at the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games.

The Chicago Marathon marks Farah’s third go at the distance and his first 42K on U.S. soil. He joins defending champion and former training partner, Galen Rupp, at the front of this year’s elite pack. Farah and Rupp made history together at the 2012 London Olympics, finishing with the gold and silver in the 10,000m.

“Mo and Galen are two of the greatest distance runners of all time,” said Executive Race Director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon Carey Pinkowski. “They come to Chicago following in the footsteps of incredible runners like Khalid Khannouchi, Sammy Wanjiru, Moses Tanui, Paul Tergat, Steve Jones and more.

These two runners have competed at the highest level of competition and I’m confident they will come prepared for what’s shaping up to be an epic showdown.”

Farah made his marathon debut in 2014 in London, clocking 2:08: 21 to finish eighth. He refocused his energy on the track and the 2016 Rio Olympics before tackling the distance again this spring. He finished third in London with a new personal best and a national record, 2:06:21. Farah dazzled fans at the 2016 Rio Olympics when he experienced a dramatic fall, tumbling hard to the track, in the 10,000m.

Instead of panicking, he found his feet, rejoined the pack and ran away from the rest of the field to win gold. In addition to his Olympic and world titles, he has landed on the top of the podium 20 times in the Diamond League track competitions.

Farah holds national track records in the 1500m, 3000m, two-mile, 5000m and 10,000m, and British road records in the 5K, 10K, 20K, half marathon and marathon. In 2017, Farah was named BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year.

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon in 2018 will re-introduce pacers ” “rabbits” ” into the elite competition after breaking from the tradition for the past few years.

“The championship style of racing that spectators enjoy will continue as the race enters its final miles,” Pinkowski said. “The epic 2010 duel between the late Wanjiru and Tsegaye Kebede – arguably one of the greatest finishes in marathon history – underscores the importance of the tactics that still exist and flourish in paced races.”

Pinkowski and event organizers decided to transition back to pacers to leverage the speed of the course, to work towards setting up ideal conditions for the top tier elite athletes confirmed so far, and to respond to feedback received from runners.

“We listened to the athletes and they want to come to Chicago because of our tradition of fast times and our legacy as a world record course,” continued Pinkowski. “If athletes want to run in races without pacers, there are several opportunities for them to do so.”

runnersweb.com

Rupp to defend his Chicago Marathon title

Organisers of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that defending champion Galen Rupp and Jordan Hasay will return to the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, an IAAF Gold Label road race, on 7 October.

““Galen and Jordan are leading an exciting American resurgence in the marathon, and we are thrilled to welcome them back to Chicago this coming fall,”” said Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski. ““Galen won in a decisive move last year and just dominated a talented men’’s field. Jordan ran with pure guts and she was rewarded with a podium finish and the fastest American time ever run on Chicago’s course. She has found her distance with the marathon.”

Rupp’’s commitment to the race comes on the heels of his victory and personal best at the Prague Marathon on 6 May. Rupp ran to a convincing win, stopping the clock in 2:06:07 to become the third-fastest US marathoner.

Rupp, the 2016 Olympic Marathon bronze medallist and the 2012 Olympic 10,000m silver medallist, stamped his name in Chicago Marathon history with less than three miles to go last fall to become the first US male runner to win since Khalid Khannouchi broke the tape in 2002, clocking 2:09:20.

Last fall, Hasay hit the first 10 kilometres on course-record pace and hung on to finish third in 2:20:57, the second-fastest time ever recorded by a US athlete.

“I’’m thrilled to be coming back to Chicago,”” said Hasay. “My goal is to target a fast time and contend for the win.”