Tag Archives: Brigid Kosgei

Letesenbet Gidey: First and Only woman to hold 4 World Records simultaneously

She remains a unique women athlete on the globe, breaking all records before her as she holds four world records under her medal cabinet.

Ethiopian Letesenbet Gidey remains a woman of all firsts after shooting into the limelight in 2015 when she won the World Cross Country Junior Championships in Guiyang, China.

Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia Wins the World Cross Country junior title in 2015. PHOTO: Getty Images

Born and raised in the troubled Endameskel, aged 17 years, she made her name known across the globe when she won the world cross country junior title for her nation.

She went ahead to win bronze at the 2019 World Cross Country Championships behind the champion Hellen Obiri and her country mate Dera Dida.

At 21, she won silver in 10,000m at the 2019 event with her personal best of 30:21.23 in a race that was won by Sifan Hassan from the Netherlands who also ran a world lead with the late Agnes Jebet Tirop winning bronze.

In the same year Gidey went on produced again one of her fastest time ever in the Outdoor 3000m race that was held in Palo Alto, California where she set a National Record of 8:20.27.

Letesenbet Gidey destroyed women’s 15km World record at the annual Zevenheuvelenloop in Nijmegen, Netherlands. PHOTO: NN Running Team

The Ethiopian went on rampage in November 2019 setting a new world record of 44:20 in the 15K run at the Zevenheuvelenloop road race in Nijmegen, Netherlands, breaking the previous world record held by Joyciline Jepkosgei that she had set in 2017 by more than a minute, and becoming the first woman to run 15K under 45 minutes.

Having four titles as a junior, she went to 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games with a mission to be on the podium and she did with a bronze in the 10,000m behind Sifan Hassan with Bahrain’s Kalkidan Gezahegne (the current 10Km world record holder though not ratified) taking the silver.

Letesenbet Gidey Shatters 5000 World Record Valencia. PHOTO NN RUNNING TEAM

With just six years since 2015, Gidey has written her name in four world record events she smashed her first world 5,000m record during the 2020 in 14:06.62 and this summer she went ahead and shattered the world record in the 10,000 meters in Hengelo, Netherlands. She is the first woman since Ingrid Kristiansen from 1986-1993 to hold them both simultaneously.

Letesenbet Gidey poses for after breaking the world record in women’s 10,000m. PHOTO: COURTESY

Gidey obliterated the women’s half marathon world record in her debut at the distance, winning the Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso in 1:02.52. The Ethiopian’s performance improved on the previous world record of 1:04.02 that had been set by Ruth Chepngetich in Istanbul in April—by 70 seconds. This was the third world record the 23-year-old has broken in the last year.

Gidey’s winning time of 1:02.52 marks the first time a woman has ever run faster than the 64 and 63-minute barrier for the half marathon distance.

To put Gidey’s time into perspective, according to World Athletics scoring tables, 62:02 equates to approximately a 13:50 5K, 29-minute 10K and a 2:11 marathon.

Her performance in the half-marathon surpassed both of her previous records. It also indicates that if she moves up to the marathon, she’ll be a strong contender to take down that record as well, which is currently held by Brigid Kosgei at 2:14:04.

This time shows the projections of what someone could run at different distances based on that performance. Her actual splits on that day were no less impressive, however, and she went through 5K in 15:00, sped up over the next 5K to split 29:45 for 10K and went through 15K in 44:29. This 15K time is remarkable, considering it is only nine seconds slower than her own 15K world record.

Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey smashes the World Half Marathon record at the Valencia Half Marathon. PHOTO: Getty Images

Peres Jepchirchir and Joyciline Jepkosgei expected to share WMM jackpot prize

Newly crowned New York City marathon champion Peres Jepchirchir and London marathon champion Joyciline Jepkosgei will be battling for the World Marathon Majors jack pot prize.

Following the conclusion of the marathon season on Sunday at the New York, the two marathon queens will be on for the prize following their dominance in the majors.

Jepchirchir, who won New York garnered 25 points to add on her Olympic marathon win is expected to share the prize with Jepkosgei, the winner on 2020 New York City marathon and 2021 London marathon, who have all gained 50 points from the two wins.

Kenya’s Peres Jepchirchir wins the women’s marathon final during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in Sapporo on August 7, 2021. (Photo by Giuseppe CACACE / AFP)

Another Kenyan runner on the prize list will be world marathon record holder Brigid Kosgei, who won silver at the Olympic Games and finished 4th at the London marathon.

Jepchirchir said it will be a tricky way of earnings after enjoying the 2020 and 2021 season winning all her races and setting two world records and reclaiming her world half marathon title.

“This time, it will be a challenge in sharing the prize money but that is not a problem at all,” said Jepchirchir after winning New York City marathon on Sunday.

She also said that, after winning her first world marathon majors title she will have to take a break.

Athletics – London Marathon – London, Britain – October 3, 2021 Kenya’s Joyciline Jepkosgei celebrates winning the elite women’s race REUTERS/Matthew Childs

After closing a season on a high note, the Valencia marathon champion said she had had a successful 2020/2021 season and it is her high time to take a break, as she thinks of the next move next season.

“It has been a good season for me. Both last year and this year’s where I have won in almost all races I have competed in and it will be my time to bond with the family back home,” said Jepchirchir while in the USA after winning her third marathon in all four marathons she has run.

Last year, Jephirchir came from maternity leave to win her second world half marathon title as well as the Valencia marathon.

“My journey has been a success and in all these I owe it to God and the first thing is to give my body time to recover well,” added Jepchirchir.

At the New York City marathon, she won the title in 2:22.39 beating her country mate Viola Cheptoo Lagat and Ethiopian Ababel Yeshaneh to second and third in 2:22:44 as Yeshaneh clocked 2:24.42 respectively.

She said that it was a wonderful win that she expected following her intense training.

“It was wonderful, winning this marathon. The year has been so great. After winning the Olympic title, I did not expect to win this title. I was well prepared despite the fact that there was limited time before the race,” Jepchirchir said.

With world championships and Commonwealth Games coming next year, Jepchirchir was reluctant to commit to the two championships saying she will be making her announcement next year on her next move.

“For now I want to relax and recover my body. Once I resume my training by next year, I will be in for a better season,” said Jepchirchir who will be arriving in the country on Tuesday morning.

 

Kenenisa Bekele, Peres Jepchirchir favoured as New York City Marathon returns

Kenenisa Bekele is looking forward to his New York City Marathon debut and Olympic champion Peres Jepchirchir bids to build on her stellar 2021 when the famous five-borough race returns on Sunday after a year-long COVID-mandated hiatus.

The second-fastest marathoner of all time with a 2:01:41 personal best, Ethiopia’s Bekele is the only runner in the men’s field with a sub-2:06 performance to his name, but he will have to fend off Olympic silver medallist Abdi Nageeye of the Netherlands to reach the top of the podium.

“I will be in (a) good position,” said Bekele, who finished third in Berlin in September. “It’s a new course and a new challenge for me, but I’ll have a good result, I’m sure.”

The 39-year-old was drawn to New York with the goal of getting more experience in the United States – this will be only his second U.S. marathon – and to build on a legacy that includes three Olympic gold medals – two in the 10,000 metres and one in the 5,000 – and five World Championship golds.

“After Berlin I recovered well. My dream will come true to participate in this race,” Bekele said.

Kenyan Jepchirchir, who triumphed in a duel with compatriot Brigid Kosgei to win the Tokyo Olympic marathon, expects a tough race from rivals including American Molly Seidel, who picked up bronze at the Games.

“To have strong people in a competition, it helps a lot to push, run good,” said Jepchirchir, who counts four-times New York champion Mary Keitany as a mentor.

Sally Kipyego, who finished third at the 2020 U.S. Olympic trials, is also among the 13 Tokyo Olympians to feature in Sunday’s race three months after the Games.

“I would love top five,” said Kipyego, the runner-up in 2016. “Even top 10 Sunday would be good just because of what I’m dealing with. I’m dealing with a tired body.”

The New York City Marathon, which did not take place last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, will have a number of safeguards in place, including mandatory proof of vaccine or a negative test within 48 hours before the race.

Brigid Kosgei and Geoffrey Kirui Launch Nakuru City Marathon

The World Marathon Record holder Brigid Kosgei and former world marathon champion Geoffrey Kirui launched the inaugural Nakuru City Marathon that will be held on November 28th in Nakuru town.

The race was unveiled by Nakuru County governor Lee Kinyanjui.

Stanbic Bank CEO Charles Mudiwa said they have to sponsor athletes in Nakuru County. the Bank is the title sponsors of the race

Winners of the 21km will receive Ksh 500,000 while 10km will go home with kshs 100,000 for both men and women and the prizes will trickle down to 15th finisher.

There will also be a 5km fun race for families and corporate. I will run this race.

We welcome elite and upcoming athletes to participate in this race.

“We also welcome other sponsors to come on board to help nurture the talent of the youth in Nakuru County.

Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich target Chicago Marathon crowns

Kenya’s Reuben Kipyego and Ruth Chepngetich head the fields for the Bank of America Chicago Marathon on Sunday (10), with Sara Hall and Galen Rupp leading US hopes at the World Athletics Elite Platinum Label road race.

After action in Berlin and London in recent weeks, Chicago is the next race in a busy period of major marathons and the Boston event follows just one day later. The weather in Chicago looks set to be warm, with temperatures of around 21°C expected for the start of the elite races at 7:30am local time.

The last edition of the Chicago Marathon in 2019 saw a world record fall as Kenya’s Brigid Kosgei clocked 2:14:04 to take 81 seconds from Paula Radcliffe’s 2003 mark. This time her compatriots Chepngetich, who won the 2019 world title, and Vivian Kiplagat are among the athletes in the spotlight.

Chepngetich sits fourth on the women’s marathon all-time list thanks to the 2:17:08 PB she set when winning in Dubai in 2019 and she ran a world half marathon record in Istanbul in April with 1:04:02. The 27-year-old was unable to finish the Olympic marathon in Tokyo but is looking forward to her US debut race in Chicago.

“I have never raced in the States and making my debut in such a great race like the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is more than a dream to me,” she said. “I will give all myself trying to run as fast as possible.”

Hall will be among those looking to challenge her. The US athlete beat Chepngetich at last year’s London Marathon, as the pair finished second and third respectively behind Kosgei, and Hall went on to run a PB of 2:20:32 in Arizona a couple of months later. Now she has her eye on Deena Kastor’s 2:19:36 US record, should the conditions allow.

“When I thought about where I wanted to chase the American record, I thought it would be more exciting to do it at home, in the US, and Chicago is such an epic race,” she said.

The other sub-2:25 women in the field are Kiplagat, the USA’s Keira D’Amato and Ethiopia’s Meseret Belete. Kiplagat, who ran her marathon PB of 2:21:11 in 2019, clocked 2:39:18 in Eldoret in June but showed her current form with a personal best performance in the half marathon of 1:06:07 in Copenhagen last month. Like Hall, D’Amato also ran a PB in Arizona in December, clocking 2:22:56, while 22-year-old Belete – who was sixth at the 2018 World Half Marathon Championships and ran a world U20 best of 1:07:51 later that year – has a marathon PB of 2:24:54 set when finishing fourth in Houston last year.

Among those joining them on the start line will be the USA’s Emma Bates, Diane Nukuri and Lindsay Flanagan.

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat

Kipyego ready to turn up the heat With his PB of 2:03:55 set at the Milan Marathon in May, Kipyego goes into the Chicago race as the second fastest man in 2021. The 25-year-old made his marathon debut in Buenos Aires in 2019, clocking 2:05:18, and later that year he improved to 2:04:40 to win in Abu Dhabi, despite having started the race as a pacemaker. He also seems unfazed by the warmer than expected temperatures, simply replying: ‘No problem’ at the pre-race press conference when asked about the weather.

Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura, meanwhile, explained how he is not as comfortable in the heat but he will go into the race looking to build on the 2:04:29 PB he set when finishing fourth in that same Milan Marathon in May. He also has experience of the Chicago event, having finished sixth in 2019 in 2:08:35.

Rupp leads US hopes as the 2016 Olympic bronze medallist returns to action after his eighth place in the Tokyo Olympic marathon nine weeks ago and third-place finish in the Great North Run half marathon in 1:01:52 last month. Eighth fastest among the entries, his PB of 2:06:07 was set in Prague in 2018 but he will be looking to regain the crown he claimed in 2017.

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba is also a former Chicago winner, having triumphed in 2015, and he set his PB of 2:04:32 in the same city the year before that. The fourth sub-2:05 runner in the field is Kengo Suzuki, who broke the Japanese record with his 2:04:56 to win the Lake Biwa Marathon in February.

Kenya’s Eric Kiptanui is also one to watch. Having helped to pace world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge in the past, the 58:42 half marathon runner made his own marathon debut last year and improved to 2:05:47 to win in Siena in April. “I was so happy to run 2:06 for my first marathon,” he told NN Running Team. “What it proved to me was, yes, I was in good shape but that I had the mentality to perform over the marathon distance.” Looking ahead to Chicago, he added: “I aim to run 2:03/2:04 but my first priority is to win the race.”

Ethiopia’s Chalu Deso and Shifera Tamru have respective bests of 2:04:53 and 2:05:18, while Ian Butler, who is coached by former world record-holder Steve Jones and balances his running with his job as a teacher, is the second-fastest US runner in the field with a PB of 2:09:45 set in Arizona last year.

14 Elite athletes withdraw from the Chicago Marathon

The race organizers 43rd edition of the Chicago Marathon has announced significant changes to their elite field.

Fourteen (14) elite athletes have withdrawn while seventeen elite athletes (17) have been added.

Among those who have withdrawn in the men category include Getaneh Molla from Ethiopia who holds a personal best of 2:03.34, Bahrain’s Hassan El Abbassi of 2:04.43, Kenya’s Joel Kimurer who has a personal best of 2:05.19, Laban Korir of 2:05.54, and Masato Kikuchi of 2:07.20 from Japan.

The top women elites who have withdrawn are Mexico’s Vianney De La Rosa who has a personal best of 2:20.04 and Britain’s Rosie Edwards of pb 2:31.56.

The oraganisers have now included Kenya’s Dickson Chumba who has appeared on the Chicago podium three times including a victory in 2015 and he holds a personal best of 2:04.32.

The fastest man that has been included in this field is Reuben Kipyego from Kenya who comes to this race with 2:03.55 that he got early this year at the Generali Milano Marathon, where he finished in second place.

Kenya’s Eric Kiptanui—also known as “captain of the pacemakers” and “kingmaker” for his work leading a team of 41 pacemakers to help teammate Eliud Kipchoge run a blistering 1:59.40 marathon in Vienna in –2019—enters this year’s Bank of America Chicago Marathon with a fresh personal best, 2:05:47.

Japan’s nation’s national marathon record holder, Kengo Suzuki of who holds a personal best of 2:04.56  and Ethiopia’s Chalu Deso of pb 2:04.53 who finished sixth at the Valencia Marathon in 2020 have also been included.

The women elite side, Vivian Kiplagat comes with a personal best of 2:21.11 with Ethiopia’s Meseret Belete who holds a pb of 2:24.54 and Americans Carrie Dimoff and Maegan Krifchin both with personal best of 2:31.12 and 2:33.14respectively have joined the race.

The top runners will receive USD 55,000, down from USD 100,000 in 2019 when the race was last contested. The winning wheelchair athletes will receive $20,000, and the top American runners will get $15,000 (equal to 2019). Although the event has a history of fast times, organizers are not offering any publicly-reported time bonuses this year.

Kenyans Brigid Kosgei and Lawrence Cherono, who are the reigning champion will not be racing this year. Kosgei who set a world record of 2:14.04 when she won the 2019 edition, ran the Virgin Money London Marathon last Sunday and finished fourth. She also won the silver medal at the Olympic Marathon in Sapporo last August. Cherono, finished fourth at the Olympic Marathon and has not been announced for a fall marathon.

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Joyciline Jepkosgei wins the 2021 London Marathon

Kenya’s Joyciline Jepkosgei became the seventh fastest woman of all time when she took the top honor at the 2021 Virgin London Marathon that was held on Sunday (3) in the streets of London.

The reigning New York Marathon champion also set a new personal best when she cut the tape in 2:17.43 on her debut in the British capital, becoming the seventh fastest woman in history.

The 28-year-old, who was a pacemaker in London two years ago, finished 15 seconds ahead of Ethiopian Degitu Azimeraw whose compatriot Ashete Bekere came third. “Some years back I was pacing [in] London so it was better preparation,” Jepkosgei said. “And the day [winning the race] has finally come… I’m privileged to be in London.”

The world women marathon record holder Brigid Kosgei, competing eight weeks after claiming silver at the Tokyo Olympics, was aiming for a third consecutive victory in London. The 27-year-old rallied briefly but finished fourth in 2:18.40.

 

 

Where to watch the LONDON MARATHON

The 2021 London Marathon takes place on Sunday, October 3. The elite women start at 4:00 a.m. EDT, and the elite men start at 4:30 a.m. EDT.

The women’s field is led by defending champion and world record-holder Brigid Kosgei. The men’s field is led by defending champion Shura Kitata, who will be joined by three athletes with sub-2:03 personal bests.

The 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon will be broadcast live in 198+ countries with worldwide news access.

Please see table below for details of which broadcaster or channel is showing coverage in your region.

scroll across to see the full list

Broadcaster Territory
Flotrack Australia, Canada & USA
SportTV 2 Brazil
Great Sports Channel China
Olympic Channel China, Japan & MENA*
EBU Europe
ZDF Germany
Sport 1 Israel
NTV Kenya
Sky Sport 6 New Zealand
NRK 1 Norway
SuperSport Variety 3 and 4 Pan Africa
Eurosport 2 Pan Asia & Pan Europe*
Eurosport Player Pan Asia & Pan Europe*
Discovery+ Pan Asia & Pan Europe*
ESPN Play Pan Latin America*
Star+ Pan Latin America*
Teledeporte Spain
SRG-SSR Switzerland
ZBC2 Tanzania
NTV Uganda
Reuters Worldwide (excluding UK)
SNTV Worldwide (excluding UK)

Brigid Kosgei targets third straight London Marathon title

Tokyo Olympic silver medallist, Brigid Kosgei will attempt to win her third successive women’s title at the London Marathon that will be held on Sunday (3) in the Streets of London.

The 27-year-old, who is recovering from the heat and humidity of Sapporo in Japan in early August, is likely to face considerably cooler and damper conditions in the British capital.

The worry is whether she has recovered and rediscovered sufficient fitness given the short turnaround since the Games, where she finished in second place behind Peres Jepchirchir.

“My body was very tired after the Olympics but I did a lot of preparation to correct this and now I have come to London to do my best,” said Kosgei, who took only a couple of days off after her marathon at the Games before getting back into training.

On claiming a hat-trick of titles in London this weekend, Kosgei added: “I love London so I would really like to do that here. I am ready as I have prepared well as I want to defend my title.”

Mary Keitany, who retired a few days ago, won London three times in recent years – the latter with a women-only world record of 2:17.01. This is a natural target for Kosgei, who holds the outright women’s world record with with a time of 2:14.04 that she got at the 2019 Chicago Marathon.

Paula Radcliffe also won three London Marathon titles, but Katrin Dörre from Germany will be remembered in history books as the only woman who has won the race back to back from 1992 to 1994.

Kosgei won her first London crown two years ago in 2:18.20 but then returned last year during the pandemic to win an elite- only race in 2:18.58.

The World women record-holder was speaking at the pre-event press conferences in a hotel just outside Windsor along with rival runners Joyciline Jepkosgei of Kenya and Birhane Dibaba of Ethiopia after they had arrived on a charter flight from east Africa.

The East African elite athletes were carried in a special flight which was arranged by the race organizers due to the pandemic.

Jepkosgei is the reigning New York City Marathon champion while Dibaba is a two-time winner in the Tokyo Marathon.

Hellen Obiri to headline Great North Run

Olympic 5000m silver medalist Hellen Obiri will headline the 40th edition of the Great North Run half marathon that will be held on Sunday (12) from Newcastle to South Shields in England.

The 31 year-old made her half marathon debut at the Istanbul Half Marathon last April where she ran an exceptional 1:04.51 making her the fourth-fastest Kenyan of all-time.

The versatile Obiri is the only woman in history to win world titles in indoor track, outdoor track and cross country.

Obiri has been defeated three times recently on the track by Namibia’s Francine Niyonsaba including yesterday’s race in Zuric Meet where she finished second and called it a day on the track events as she now puts her energy on road races.

Obiri will face off with Tokyo 2020 marathon bronze medallist, Molly Seidel from United States who comes to this race with a personal best of 1:08.29 that she got early this year at the Atlanta Motor Speedway 2021.

The race course record of 1:04.28 that was set in 2019 by Brigid Kosgei from Kenya is within her reach considering her personal best during her debut.