Tag Archives: Birhanu Legese

2022 Boston Marathon is the deepest field in history

This Boston Marathon may not have legends Eliud Kipchoge or Kenenisa Bekele, but it does have most of the other stars of recent years. It is arguably the deepest Boston men’s field in the race’s 126-year history.

Like with the women’s race, Boston got a boost with a return to its Patriots’ Day date for the first time since 2019. The world’s other jewel spring marathon, London, which usually has the best roster of the spring, is once again being held in the fall this year due to the pandemic.

So this field includes every man who won Boston, London and New York City in 2019 and 2021 (save Kipchoge), the last two world champions, plus recent winners of Chicago and Tokyo.

Picking a favorite is difficult, but the entries can be separated between recent breakthroughs and veteran champions.

Three men in the field earned their first major marathon victories last fall: Kenyans Benson Kipruto (Boston) and Albert Korir (New York City) and Ethiopian Sisay Lemma (London).

The names with more pizzazz: Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor, a longtime training partner of Kipchoge, won New York City in 2017 and 2019, plus three world half marathon titles. But he was fourth in his lone marathon since the start of the pandemic, missing time after fracturing a tibia when hit by a motorcycle while training in June 2020.

Kenyan Lawrence Cherono is the only man other than Kipchoge to win two annual major marathons in one year since the start of 2015. He claimed Boston and Chicago in 2019 and hasn’t had a bad marathon in four years.

Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa is still just 32 years old, which is remarkable given his resume: Boston champion in 2013 and 2015, New York City champion in 2018 and world champion in 2019. He has a DNF and a 35th in two marathons over the last two and a half years, though.

Another Ethiopian, Birhanu Legese, is the third-fastest man in history and thus the fastest man in this field with a personal best of 2:02:48 from 2019. He won Tokyo in 2019 and 2020 and hasn’t finished worse than fifth in a marathon in the last three and a half years.

Ethiopians Lemi Berhanu (won Boston in 2016, second in 2021) and Evans Chebet (seventh-fastest man in history at 2:03:00) also deserves mention.

The fastest Americans in the field are Scott Fauble (2:09:09) and Colin Bennie (2:09:38), plus Olympians Jake Riley and Jared Ward.

Source:  olympics.nbcsports.com

Eliud Kipchoge to debut at Tokyo Marathon

World Marathon record-holder Eliud Kipchoge will make his debut at the 16th edition of the Tokyo Marathon which is a World Athletics Elite Platinum Label road race that will be held on March, 6, 2022.

Kipchoge’s goes to this race with the World’s leading time of 2:01.39 and will be facing a strong rich field including eight men with personal bests of under 2:05 barrier.

They include the defending champion, Ethiopia’s Birhanu Legese who is seeking to win his third Tokyo marathon title. Legese is third on the world marathon all-time list and his compatriot World sillver medallist, Mosinet Geremew.

Also in the race World bronze medallist, Kenya’s Amos Kipruto, the 2017 world marathon silver medallist, Ethiopia’s Tamirat Tola and their fellow sub-2:05 runners Shura Kitata, the 2020 world marathon majors champion, Kenya’s Jonathan Korir.

Home boy Japanese record-holder Kengo Suzuki, who ran 2:04.56 at the Lake Biwa Marathon in 2020 is also in contention as he tries to break the Africans footholds in marathon running.

“I would like to thank the organisers of the Tokyo Marathon to make it possible for me and my colleague athletes to race in Tokyo,” said Kipchoge. “My focus has been on Tokyo from the beginning of my training cycle, and I can say I am ready to race there. I am very excited to run in a country where running is a crucial part of the sport culture and am looking forward to experiencing the Japanese excitement for running the marathon in particular.”

Shura Kitata to defend his London Marathon title despite hamstring injury

Ethiopia’s Shura Kitata who is the reigning London Marathon champion has insisted he is ready to defend his crown on Sunday (3) despite being troubled by a hamstring injury.

Last year in October, Kitata edged a sprint finish in the elite men’s race to topple the great Eliud Kipchoge, who had won the annual event in England’s capital on four occasions.

The Ethiopian could not follow up a maiden London Marathon title with success at the Olympics this summer and pulled out in hot and humid conditions in Sapporo.

“I have some slight problems but still I am preparing to win and looking forward to it,” the 25-year-old said via a translator during Wednesday’s press conference.

“I was prepared very well before the Olympics and just two weeks before I had a hamstring injury, that was a big pressure for me. Otherwise I have prepared well and I am feeling confident to run on Sunday.

“The hamstring and the pain is not really easy and when it is a very fast speed, there might be some problem but I am looking forward to doing what I did before.”

Another sprint finish this year would raise doubts over the Ethiopian’s ability to clinch the event for a second time but he reflected on the life-changing experience of triumphing over Kipchoge, who bounced back to defend his Olympic title in August.

“I was very happy with the win last year and it had great meaning because Eliud is a very famous runner and a very strong runner so winning meant a lot,” Kitata added.

Kitata will battle for the honors with Evans Chebet from Kenya who will be making his debut and Birhanu Legese from Ethiopia who is the fastest man in the field following his winning run of 2:02.48 at the 2019 Berlin Marathon.

All you need to know about the Virgin Money London Marathon

The 2021 London Marathon is set to take place at the end of this week, making a physical return after a virtual event was held in 2020 due to the Coronavirus pandemic.

An estimated 100,000 runners are expected to take part, making this the biggest event yet in its history.

Before that though there is an important event competitors will need to attend ahead of making their way to the starting line.

The Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show begins from tomorrow (Wednesday 29 September).

It is a place to soak in the atmosphere of the famous run with a number of speakers and activities to take in.

Also, it is part of the Six Steps to the Start Line that all runners need to complete to be able to actually be allowed to run.

Here’s all you need to know about the exhibition.

What do runners need to do at the Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show?
A number of steps from the ‘Six Steps to the Start Line’ need to be completed by runners at the event.

This starts with Step 2, which is packing your kitbag in advance.

The kitbag would have been sent to runners ahead of time, and it will be handed to them once they cross the finish line on the day.

Things to put in might be warm clothing or non-perishable food items.

Even if you don’t want to put anything in, you still need to bring it to the Running Show as a souvenir medal; New Balance finisher’s T-shirt, BUXTON Natural Mineral Water and Lucozade Sport will be included regardless.

Dropping off your kitbag is the main part of attending.

Taking a lateral flow test on the day you are going to the ExCel centre is also important, as proof of a negative test and your kitbag will be required for you to pick up your bib number.

What if I cannot attend the Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show?

If you are a runner and you cannot attend the event then you can nominate someone to drop your items off for you.

They must have:

  • Your kitbag with the self-adhesive sticker attached
  • A letter, written and signed by you, authorising that person – by name – to collect your bib number and drop off your kitbag
  • A clear photocopy of your passport or driving licence showing your name and your signature
  • Evidence of their negative lateral flow test
  • Their own suitable photo identification with them

What will be on at the Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show?
Over 100 charities and other companies will have stands at the event.

This ranges from the likes of the WWF, British Heart Foundation and Alzheimer’s Research UK to Joe Nimble, Knead It Sport, Peloton and New Balance.

Additionally, special celebrity guests and experts will be there to provide insight on how best to approach the run.

BBC Breakfast presenter Louise Minchin will be one of those people, having run the virtual event last year, with talks like ‘Running Free of Injuries’ with Paul Hobrough will also be useful.

In 2019, Sir Mo Farah was one of those individuals to come along

Where does the Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show take place?
The show is taking place at ExCel London, with the closest station being the Prince Regent DLR.

Full address is: ExCel London – Entrance Hall S10, Royal Victoria Dock, 1 Western Gateway, London, E16 1XL.

What time is the Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show open?
It is open from Wednesday 29 September to Saturday 2 October in the build-up to the actual marathon.

From Wednesday to Friday it is open from 10am to 8pm, with slightly shorter hours on Saturday from 8.30am to 5.30pm.

Source: surreycomet.co.uk

Vincent Kipchumba to battle Shura Kitata at London Marathon

Ethiopia’s Shura Kitata will have an uphill task at the 41st edition of the Virgin London Marathon that will be held on Sunday (3) in the streets of London.

Kitata who just edged a sprint finish to the line beating his main rival Vincent Kipchumba from Chumba whom he forced to cross the line in second.

The Ethiopian ended Eliud Kipchoge’s dominance last year will be looking to bounce back after he succumbed to the heat and humidity of Sapporo, failing to finish the Olympic marathon. He tends to do well in London, having come second in 2018 and fourth in 2019.

Kitata will once again battle his main challenger Kipchumba at the same race as they seek to dethrone each other. Kipchumba came incredibly close to winning in London, a run which followed up winning performances in Vienna and Amsterdam in 2019. The 31 years-old comes to this race with a personal best of 2:05.09 that he got in Amsterdam in 2019.

The third-fastest marathon runner of all time, Birhanu Legese will also be on the start line and he will be out to continue his winning habit after victories in the Tokyo Marathon both in 2019 and last year. Legese comes to this race with the fastest time on paper of 2:02.48 that he got in 2019 at the Berlin Marathon.

The reigning Valencia Marathon champion Evans Chebet will also be battling for thye honors as he comes to this race with a personal best of 2:03.00 that he got last year in Valencia.

Selected others:

  1. Mosinet GEREMEW    (ETH) 2:02.55 PB
  2. Titus EKIRU                  (KEN) 2:02.57 PB
  3. Mule WASIHUN            (ETH) 2:03.16 PB
  4. Sisay LEMMA                (ETH) 2:03.36 PB
  5. Kinde ATANAW             (ETH) 2:03.51 PB
  6. Tristan WOODFINE      (CAN) 2:10.51 PB

2020 Results

Men

  1. Shura Kitata                (ETH) 2:05.41
  2. Vincent Kipchumba   (KEN) 2:05.42
  3. Sisay Lemma                (ETH)  2:05.45

Kenenisa Bekele targets the World record at Berlin-Marathon

World record holder in both the 5000m and 10000m, Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia will be targeting to lower the marathon world record at the 48th edition of the BMW Berlin-Marathon that will be held on 26th September in Berlin, Germany.

Bekele will target to lower his time as he clearly demonstrated it when he took the top honors at the 2019 Berlin marathon when he crossed the line with the second fastest time of 2:01.41.

This is underlined not only by his victories at the Berlin-Marathon in 2016 and 2019, but also by his captivating performances at the 2009 World Athletics Championships in the capital city on the Spree River. At the races in the Olympic Stadium, Bekele won World Championship gold in the 10,000 m for the fourth time in a row and took the World Championship title in the 5,000 m a week later.

“I will come back with good energy and motivation to Berlin-Marathon. The last race in Berlin motivated me a lot, so I hope I will fulfil my plan this year.” So, in many ways, the Berlin-Marathon 2021 will be an event with historic sporting significance,” Bekele said.

The 39-year-old will try to match or lower the time of his only rival the greatest athlete of all time Eliud Kipchoge, who ran 2:01.39 in 2018 and ranks above him in the world all-time list. Bekele knows all too well what it is like to miss the world record by a narrow margin.

In 2016, he won in 2:03.03 which was just six seconds outside the then world record. There are also historical precedents for such narrow misses in marathon history: in 1985 the Welshman Steve Jones ran within one second of the world record in Chicago.

The 2019 podium clean swept by Ethiopians as Birhanu Legese, crossed the line in second in 2:02.48 to become the third fastest marathoner in history. Third place went to Sisay Lemma, running a personal best of 2:03.36.

Shura Kitata faces a tough battle as he defends his London Marathon title

Ethiopia’s Shura Kitata will be the star to watch at the 41st edition of the London Marathon that will be held on 3rd October in London.

Kitata who pulled out of the Olympic Games marathon last weekend after suffering in the hot and humid conditions in Sapporo – will line up with the other men who joined by Vincent Kipchumba from Kenya and Sisay Lemma from Ethiopia, who also struggled in the heat of the Olympic Games marathon.

Shura beat Eliud Kipchoge in the 2020 London Marathon to secure his first London Marathon title, just a second ahead of Vincent Kipchumba.

The two will be joined by the 2020 Valencia Marathon champion, Evans Chebet who was the fastest man in the world last year with his personal best of 2:03.00.Another title contender is the two-time Tokyo Marathon champion Birhanu Legese from Ethiopia, who is the third-fastest marathoner of all time with a time of 2:02.48 that he got at the 2019 Berlin Marathon.

Kitata will also face-off with Mosinet Geremew and  Mule Wasihun both coming to the race with a personal best of 2:02.55 and 2:03.16) respectively. This two also finished on the podium at the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon, also return.

Kitata was quoted by race organisers saying,“I was disappointed to have to pull out of the Olympic Games marathon but I just did not adapt to the weather well. It was very cold in Ethiopia prior to leaving for Tokyo and when we got there the weather took its toll on my body and made my breathing very hard. But I’m healthy and looking forward to racing in the Virgin Money London Marathon again. I am preparing very well and my coach has me very ready to defend my title in London.

 “Winning last year was an unforgettable memory and it gave me huge excitement to bring back such a big victory to my country and to make my family and coaches proud. I have set my mind on how I can run fast and better than last year and I’m looking forward to seeing if I can repeat the victory and make history in the race.”

Virgin Money London Narathon event director, Hugh Brasher, said: “We are delighted to welcome our reigning champions back to defend their titles at the 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon and, as always, they will be challenged by a stellar field of the world’s best marathon runners. Sunday 3 October is set to be an extraordinary day in our history as these great athletes lead the way as tens of thousands of mass runners take on their 26.2 mile challenge from Greenwich to Westminster and around the world in the virtual event.”

The organisers have allowed a limit of up to 50,000 runners in the mass race and up to 50,000 around the world to take on the virtual event, completing the 26.2 miles on the route of their choice any time between 00:00 and 23:59:59 BST.

LEADING RESULTS

ELITE MEN

Name Country PB
Birhanu LEGESE ETH 2:02:48
Mosinet GEREMEW ETH 2:02:55
Titus EKIRU KEN 2:02.57
Evans CHEBET KEN 2:03.00
Mule WASIHUN ETH 2:03.16
Sisay LEMMA ETH 2:03.36
Kinde ATANAW ETH 2:03.51
Shura KITATA ETH 2:04.49
Vincent KIPCHUMBA KEN 2:05.09
Tristan WOODFINE CAN 2:10.51

Abel Kirui,Dickson Chumba and Brigid Kosgei Headline Bank of America Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that several international running stars are joining the 41st annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon elite athlete competition.

Past champions Abel Kirui (KEN) and Dickson Chumba (KEN) lead the charge on the men’s side, and 2017 runner-up Brigid Kosgei (KEN) and two-time podium finisher Birhane Dibaba (ETH) stand out among the women. They will join previously announced global sensations Mo Farah (GBR), Yuki Kawauchi (JPN) and Suguru Osako (JPN).

This year’s elite field includes 11 men who have run 2:07 or faster and nine women (including three Americans) who have run 2:25 or faster. Moreover, it features five of the top eight men who placed on top of the Abbott World Marathon Majors (AbbottWMM) Series XI leaderboard and two of the top seven women.

“We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Bank of America Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski. ‘This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international and American athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago.”

Men’s International Field

Dickson Chumba set his personal best, 2:04:32, in Chicago in 2014 when he finished third on a historic day that witnessed three of the top five times ever run in Chicago (Chumba is the fifth fastest runner in Chicago’s history). He came back to win in 2015 and while he tried to defend his title in 2016, he came up three seconds short, finishing second to Abel Kirui. Since he embarked on his marathon career in 2010, he has finished 17 marathons and he boasts an impressive record: five wins, five runner-ups and four third place finishes. He lines up this fall after opening his 2018 season with his second win at the Tokyo Marathon. His time, 2:05:30, was the second fastest winning time in Tokyo’s history. Chumba finished in fifth place on the AbbottWMM Series XI leaderboard.

Abel Kirui literally danced across the finish line when he won his first AbbottWMM in Chicago in 2016, defeating a strong field in a tactical race that saw erratic pace swings from 4:33 per mile to 5:24. He returned in 2017 to defend his title, but he failed to match Galen Rupp’s kick at the end. Kirui consistently performs well in both tactical and paced races; he finished fourth in London to commence his 2018 season, and he owns a personal best of 2:05:04. Kirui also stands out as one of the most decorated athletes in the field – he took home a silver medal in the marathon at the 2012 London Olympics and he won both the 2009 and 2011 IAAF World Marathon Championships.

Mosinet Geremew (ETH) and Birhanu Legese (ETH) bring both youth and speed to a competitive international field. Geremew started 2018 with a bang, breaking the course record in Dubai and posting a fresh personal best, 2:04:00. He has run south of the hour mark four times in the half marathon, and he is a four-time winner of the Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon. Chicago marks his second shot at competing in an AbbottWMM (and just his fourth go at 42K). He lined up last fall in Berlin and ran away with an impressive third place finish.

Legese, the youngest athlete in this year’s elite field, opened the year by making his marathon debut in Dubai, finishing sixth in a swift 2:04:15. Prior to moving up in distance, he specialized in the half marathon, winning titles in New Delhi (twice), Berlin and the United Arab Emirates. He holds a personal best in the half of 59:20.

Kenneth Kipkemoi (KEN), Paul Lonyangata (KEN), Geoffrey Kirui (KEN), Bedan Karoki (KEN), Stephen Sambu (KEN) and Augustine Choge (KEN) continue the marathon’s tradition of welcoming strong athletes from Kenya to the windy city. Kipkemoi boasts the 25th fastest time in history over the half marathon distance, 59:01, and he started 2018 with a successful marathon debut, running 2:05:44 to win the Rotterdam Marathon. He has represented Kenya in both the half marathon and the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships.

Lonyangata just missed a spot in the top three in Chicago in 2016, coming home in fourth after enduring uneven pace swings. He set his personal best, 2:06:10, while winning the 2017 Paris Marathon, and he welcomed 2018 by becoming the first back-to-back winner of the Paris Marathon in nearly two decades.

Geoffrey Kirui experienced a significant career breakthrough when he won the laurel wreath at the 2017 Boston Marathon, shaking off American Galen Rupp in the 24th mile to cruise home to victory. That win set him up for what happened next: he took the crown at the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships.

Kirui returned to Boston this spring to defend his title, but he failed to match the strides of a hard charging Yuki Kawauchi and he was forced to settle for second. October marks Kirui’s second attempt in Chicago – he made his marathon debut here in 2014, but he dropped out of the race.

Karoki, a two-time Olympian in the 10,000m, is an exciting athlete who made his marathon debut in 2017. Prior to jumping to the marathon, he spent nearly a decade polishing his speed on the track, representing Kenya three times in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships. He made a splash this winter when he won the Ras Al Khaimah International Half Marathon in a blistering 58:42, making him the fourth fastest man in history in the half (with the fifth fastest time). He finished second at the 2016 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships, and he has finished third and fifth at the London Marathon in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

As a four-time winner of the Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K (with three of the 14 fastest times in course history), Sambu returns to Chicago as a fan favorite. He made his marathon debut here in 2016 with a fifth place finish, and he returned in 2017 to accrue another fifth place. Sambu’s speed over shorter distances predicts a faster marathon PR. With the reintroduction of pacers into this year’s field, Sambu could finally land in the top three.

Choge, a 2008 Olympian in the 1500m, has been a factor on the global stage for nearly half his life. He competed as a junior and, as a senior competitor, he has amassed an impressive resume: a world record as part of the 4x1500m Kenyan relay team, a Commonwealth Games 5000m win, a silver and bronze at the indoor IAAF World Championships, five Diamond League titles and eight Gold League wins. Choge started his transition to the roads in 2013 and he holds a personal best of 59:26 in the half. He will be making his marathon debut on October 7.

Ryo Kiname (JPN) joins previously announced Kawauchi as strong contender from Japan. Kiname, racing in North America for the first time, enters Chicago with a fresh personal best and a seventh place finish from the 2018 Tokyo Marathon, 2:08:08. He has one marathon career win to his name – the Sapporo Hokkaido Marathon in 2016.

International men’s elite field

Name

Mosinet Geremew

Birhanu Legese

Dickson Chumba

Abel Kirui

Kenneth Kipkemoi

Paul Lonyangata

Mo Farah

Geoffrey Kirui

Suguru Osako

Bedan Karoki

Ryo Kiname

Yuki Kawauchi

Mohamed Reda

Stephen Sambu

Tsukasa Koyama

Yohei Suzuki

Taku Fujimoto

Pardon Ndhlovu

Daniel Wallis

Augustine Choge

Hugh Williams

Country

ETH

ETH

KEN

KEN

KEN

KEN

GBR

KEN

JPN

KEN

JPN

JPN

MAR

KEN

JPN

JPN

JPN

ZIM

NZL

KEN

AUS

Personal best

2:04:00

2:04:15

2:04:32

2:05:04

2:05:44

2:06:10

2:06:21

2:06:27

2:07:19

2:07:41

2:08:08

2:08:14

2:09:18

2:11:07

2:11:20

2:14:53

2:15:30

2:16:22

2:19:24

Debut

Debut

Women’s International Field

Brigid Kosgei (KEN) ran spectacularly in Chicago last fall, finishing second to Tirunesh Dibaba, arguably one of the greatest runners in history. En route to her second place finish in Chicago, she smashed her personal best, running 2:20:22. Nine weeks later, she won the Honolulu Marathon in 2:22:15, a course record by over five minutes. Kosgei recorded her first marathon finish in 2015, and she has been making waves ever since. Most recently, she finished second in London in a new PR, 2:20:13. She finished in third place on the AbbottWMM leaderboard.

Roza Dereje (ETH) impressed fans in Dubai to start her 2018 season, taking down the course record and setting a three-minute PR, 2:19:17, to become the eighth fastest woman in history. She followed Dubai with another personal best, 1:07:00, and a second place finish in April at the Istanbul Half Marathon. Prior to gaining global recognition this winter, she started making a name for herself after she won the Shanghai Marathon twice in 2016 and 2017; in 2017, she posted the second fastest time, 2:22:43, in the history of the Shanghai Marathon. Dereje made her global debut in 2015 with a 2:34:02 marathon. Since then, she has run nine marathons. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon marks her first time running in an AbbottWMM.

Birhane Dibaba (ETH) took home a pair of third place finishes in Chicago in 2014 and 2015, and she arrives this fall with something only 27 women have accomplished in history: a sub 2:20 PR. Dibaba joined this exclusive club after winning the Tokyo Marathon this winter in 2:19:51. She primarily races the marathon distance, and she has finished in the top five of 13 of the 14 marathons she has run. Her compatriot, Shure Demise (ETH), is running her first Bank of America Chicago Marathon, but she has fared well on the global stage since she picked up back-to-back wins in Toronto in 2015 and 2016. She set her personal best, 2:20:59, at the 2015 Dubai Marathon. She performed well at the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships, finishing fifth. She opened her 2018 season with a fourth place at the Tokyo Marathon.

Yuka Ando (JPN) made headlines in 2017 (just shy of her 23rd birthday) when she clocked the fastest ever debut marathon by a Japanese woman, 2:21:36, at the Nagoya Marathon. Her debut performance also made her the fourth fastest woman in Japan’s history, and it was the fastest time by a Japanese woman since 2005. As a result, she punched her ticket to the 2017 IAAF World Marathon Championships where she finished 17th. She kicked off her 2018 season with a third place finish at the Osaka Marathon, but most of her energy this summer has been focused on the track sharpening her speed over 5000m and 10,000m.

Madai Perez (MEX) is back after a successful run in 2017. A two-time Olympian in the marathon, announced her comeback last fall with a 2:24:44 fourth place finish in Chicago. She logged this time fourteen years after she made her marathon debut in Chicago, and 11 years after she ran her still-standing personal best in Chicago, 2:22:59. She is a national champion in the 10,000m (2003, 2010) and a silver medalist in the Pan American Games Marathon, (2011); she has also represented Mexico at the IAAF World Championships in both the marathon and half marathon.

Alexi Pappas (GRE) announced her debut on Instagram, writing “I’ve broken tape in Chicago * paced the 26.2 ‘ I’m coming back this October ‘ to chase what I dream to do: my MARATHON DEBUT!” Pappas, a 2016 Olympian (she holds dual Greek and American citizenship), is familiar with the energy and enthusiasm of Chicago’s running community.

She won the 2015 and 2016 Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K, but her first experience in Chicago was the 2014 Bank of America Chicago Marathon where she led a group of U.S. Olympic Trials hopefuls as a pacer. Pappas experienced an impressive Olympic debut performance in the 10,000m. She set the Greek national record and a new PR to finish 17th in 31:36.16.

Other notable athletes include Jessica Draskau Petersson (DEN) with a personal best of 2:30:07; Vianey De la Rosa (MEX) with a personal best of 2:32:01; Dayna Pidhoresky (CAN) with a personal best of 2:36:08; and Hiruni Wijayaratne (SRI) with a personal best of 2:36:35.

International women’s elite field

 

Name

Roza Dereje

Birhane Dibaba

Brigid Kosgei

Shure Demise

Yuka Ando

Madai Perez

Jessica Draskau Petersson

Vianey De la Rosa

Dayna Pidhoresky

Hiruni Wijayaratne

Melanie Myrand

Chirine Njeim

Alexi Pappas

Country

ETH

ETH

KEN

ETH

JPN

MEX

DEN

MEX

CAN

SRI

CAN

LBN

GRE

Personal best

2:19:17

2:19:51

2:20:13

2:20:59

2:21:36

2:22:59

2:30:07

2:32:01

2:36:08

2:36:35

2:39:07

2:39:21

Debut

Journalists interested in covering the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon can apply for media credentials now at ChicagoMarathon.com.

Source: Runnersweb.com

Kamworor wins Bengaluru 10k Race

Kenya’s Geoffrey Kamworor lived to expectations as he won the 11th edition of the Bengaluru 10k Race that was held on Sunday (27) in Bengaluru, India.

Kamworor who has won the last two editions of the World Half Marathon cold not lower his course record that he set in 2014 of 27:44 only for him to cut the tape in 28:18.

“I think we were all cautious about the weather in the first half of the race. It was very hot, and I think that’s what cost me the course record. I came here thinking about the course record and tried the best I could, but I could feel the temperature rising as I was warming up. I was jogging for just three minutes before starting to sweat,” reflected a smiling Kamworor.

“But make no mistake, I love coming to Indian races, I love the atmosphere and certainly want to come back,” he added.

The World Half champion had to battle for honors with Birhanu Legese and the 2018 Dubai Marathon winner Mosinet Geremew.

The two Ethiopians could not match the pace of the Kenyan as they managed to battle for the second slots with Legese producing a superb kick crossing the line in 28:38 with Geremew closing the podium three one second later.

LEADING RESULTS

  1. Geoffrey Kamworo   (KEN) 28: 18
  2. Birhanu Legese         (ETH) 28:38
  3. Mosinet Geremew    (ETH) 28:39