Tag Archives: Beatrice Chepkoech

Every World Record in the Wanda Diamond League

When Karsten Warholm clocked 46.70 at his home meet in Oslo last July, it was the end of his long quest to break an almost three-decades old world record and cement his status as the fastest 400m hurdler in athletics history.

The astonishing performance also made him the seventh athlete ever to break a world record in a major discipline on the Wanda Diamond League circuit. As we look forward to another season of world-class performances in 2022, here’s a look back at every single Wanda Diamond League world record to date.

Watch all the world records on the Wanda Diamond League YouTube page.

 Aries Merritt – Brussels 2012

US hurdler Aries Merritt became the first world-record breaker in the Diamond League when he stormed to a historic 12.80 in the men’s 110m hurdles in Brussels. The performance also secured him his first and only Diamond Trophy.

 Genzebe Dibaba – Monaco 2015

Genzebe Dibaba was crowned 1500m world champion in Beijing in 2015, but she had already made it to the top of the world a few weeks earlier with a breathtaking 3:50.07 at the Stade Louis II. The dominant victory made her the series’ second world-record breaker, and the first of many at the Monaco Diamond League.

 Kendra Harrison – London 2016

Having suffered heartbreak at the US Olympic trials earlier that year, Kendra Harrison was a woman on a mission in the 2016 Diamond League as she stormed to victory after victory in the 100m hurdles. She crowned an impressive, title-winning season with a world record of 12.20 in London, a performance which left even her gaping in disbelief at the clock.

 Beatrice Chepkoech – Monaco 2018

Kenyan long-distance specialist Beatrice Chepkoech was in brilliant form in 2018, and she made it count in Monaco, clocking a 3000m steeplechase world record of 8:44.32, becoming the fifth athlete to break a world record at Herculis and the second after Dibaba to do so in the Diamond League era.

 Sifan Hassan – Monaco 2019

Dutch star Sifan Hassan had a twinkle in her eye when she was asked about a potential world record ahead of the Monaco Diamond League in 2019, and that proved a prelude to her glittering performance on the track. Her 4:12.33 made her the fastest female miler in history, and gave her another boost on her way to a Diamond League double in that season.

 Joshua Cheptegei – Monaco 2020

In a season truncated by the coronavirus pandemic, there was the only men’s 5000m race in 2020, but what a race it was. Monaco completed a hat-trick of world-record breaking years, as Ugandan long-distance star Joshua Cheptegei clocked to 12:35.36 to break the 5000m best for the first time since 2004.

 Karsten Warholm – Oslo 2021

Warholm had been closing in on the 400m hurdles world record for several seasons when he finally broke it with 46.70 on his home track in Oslo last summer. He went one better at the Olympic final in Tokyo a few weeks later, becoming the first hurdler ever to break the 46-second barrier.

Note: Three world records were also broken in non-Diamond League disciplines at the Wanda Diamond League exhibition event in Brussels in September 2020: Bashir Abdi in the 20,000m, and Mo Farah and Sifan Hassan in the One Hour.

Source: diamondleague.com

Ejegayehu Taye breaks Beatrice Chepkoech’s world 5Km Record

Ethiopia’s Ejegayehu Taye broke the World 5k record at the at the Cursa dels Nassos event that was held on the New Year Eve (Dec 31) in Barcelona.

The 21 year-old had set an Ethiopian 3000m record of 8:19.52 earlier this year, and was the second-fastest woman in the world over the 5000m this season, but this race in Barcelona was her second International road race of her career.

Taye opened up a clear gap on Sweden’s Meraf Bahta in the early stages and went on to set the new world record when she cut the in 14:18, taking 25 seconds off the previous record for the 5km in a mixed race. Bahta was second in 15:04.

The previous women’s world 5km record in a mixed race was 14:43 set by Beatrice Chepkoech in Monaco in February whereas Senbere Tefere clocked 14:29 set in Germany in September in a women-only race.

Dawit Seyaum smashes the 5KM world record

Ethiopia’s Dawit Seyaum smashed the 5KM world record at the Urbain Trail Lille Race that was held on Saturday (6) in Lille, France.

Seyaum took off two seconds from the previous record that was set in February this year by Beatrice Chepkoech from Kenya.

The 2015 African Games 1500m champion who was contesting in her fourth road race of her career, had former Africa 3,000m steeplechase champion, Norah Jeruto and African 5000m bronze medallist Meskerem Mamo for company through the early stages.

The 25 years-old held of the two surging ahead with a pace of her life as she cut the tape in a new personal best and world Record of 14:41.

Jeruto crossed the line in second place in a time of 14:43 with Mamo closing the podium first three in 14:55.

LEADING RESULTS

5KM WOMEN

  1. Dawit Seyaum        (ETH) 14:41
  2. Norah Jeruto          (KZN) 14:43
  3. Meskerem Mamo   (ETH) 14:55

Tokyo Olympics preview: 3000m steeplechase

Women’s 3000m steeplechase

The standout steeplechaser over the past few years hasn’t quite been so dominant in 2021, throwing this event wide open going into Tokyo.

Beatrice Chepkoech broke the world record in 2018, clocking 8:44.32, and then went on to win the world title in 2019 with a championship record of 8:57.84, finishing almost five seconds ahead of the rest of the field.

She finished fourth at the 2016 Olympics and at the 2017 World Championships, despite losing precious time when missing one of the barriers. She rebounded well, and throughout 2018 and 2019 she won 17 of her 19 races. She now also owns half of history’s 14 sub-nine-minute performances in the steeplechase.

But despite a promising start to her year, which included a world record of 14:43 over 5km and an indoor 3000m PB of 8:31.72 just three days later, the Kenyan hasn’t won any of her steeplechase races in 2021. Her season’s best of 9:04.94 was set when finishing a distant second at the Wanda Diamond League meeting in Monaco.

Her compatriot Hyvin Kiyeng was the winner on that occasion in what turned out to be an eventful race. Kiyeng misjudged her remaining laps due to a human error with the lap counter, so she started her final kick one lap early. Upon realising her mistake after hearing the bell for the actual final lap, she somehow managed to muster enough energy to hold on to her lead, winning in a season’s best of 9:03.82.

Kiyeng won the world title in 2015 and went on to take Olympic silver in 2016 and world bronze in 2017. She finished fourth on her season debut in Doha earlier this year but has gone on to win the rest of her races, beating Chepkoech on all three occasions.

And if she can beat a world record-holder and world champion after having messed up her finishing kick, as she did in Monaco, Kiyeng will be a big threat in Tokyo. She could even finally improve on the PB of 9:00.01 she set back in 2016.

The fastest of the entrants, somewhat surprisingly, is African Games champion Mekides Abebe, who set an Ethiopian record of 9:02.52 at the Wanda Diamond League meeting in Doha. Her only other races this year have been against domestic opposition, but she won both the Ethiopian Championships in Addis Ababa and the Ethiopian Olympic Trials in Hengelo.

Despite being just 19 years of age, Abebe is actually the oldest of Ethiopia’s steeplechase representatives. She’ll be joined in Tokyo by Lomi Muleta, who set a PB of 9:14.03 this year, and Zerfe Wondemagegn, who set a national U20 record of 9:16.95 in Hengelo. All three women represented Ethiopia at the 2019 World Championships, so, despite their young age, they will have already gained some valuable experience ahead of making their Olympic debut.

US champion Emma Coburn will once again be a medal contender. Olympic bronze medallist in 2016, world champion in 2017 and world silver medallist in 2019, Coburn is always in the mix at major events.

She fell at the last water jump in her final pre-Olympic race at the Wanda Diamond League meeting in Monaco, eventually finishing fourth in 9:09.02. She had watched Kiyeng’s blunder from afar and had started to reel in the Kenyan, though there’s also no guarantee Coburn would have won on that occasion had she stayed on her feet. Regardless, assuming she makes no such mistake in Tokyo, Coburn will be in the medal hunt.

Gesa-Felicitas Krause is another strong championship performer. The German won European golds in 2016 and 2018, sandwiched between world bronze medals in 2015 and 2019. She heads to Tokyo with a season’s best of 9:09.13, though it’s highly likely she’ll improve on that; in all but one of her 10 seasons between 2010 and 2019, Krause’s fastest times of each year were set in championship finals.

Bahrain’s Winfred Yavi just missed out on the medals at the World Championships in Doha, but gained some form of redemption when she returned to the Qatari capital for the Wanda Diamond League meeting earlier this year as she came away with a PB of 9:02.64, beating Kiyeng, Coburn and Krause.

Others who could feature in the final include North American record-holder and 2017 world silver medallist Courtney Frerichs, Slovenian record-holder Marusa Mismas-Zrimsek, 2014 Commonwealth champion Purity Kirui, Oceanian record-holder Genevieve Gregson of Australia, Chinese record-holder Zhang Xinyan and Ugandan record-holder Peruth Chemutai.

Chepkoech runs third fastest time as she lifts Brussels meeting title

World 3000m steeplechase record holder Beatrice Chepkoech lived to her expectation as she took top honors at the Brussels Diamond League that was held on Friday (31) night at the at the Memorial Van Damme in Brussels.

The 27 year-old dominated the who race after being paced for 1000m by Kenyan Caroline Tuigong, she then held on to the lead crossing the line in a new meet record of 8:55.10 run, the third fastest time in history.

The 2016 African steeplechase gold medallist, Norah Jeruto took second place with a personal best of 8:59.62 with the 2015 world championships gold medallist Hyving Kiyeng closing the podium three finishes in 9:01.60

World 3000m Steeplechase record holder takes on Chespol and Cherono in Brussels

World 3,000m steeplechase world record holder Beatrice Chepkoech will headline the Final Zurich Brussels Diamond League Meeting that will be held on Friday (31) in Brussels, Belgium.

The 27 year-old who became the first woman to break 8:50 and 8:45 will face off with with Africa silver medallist Celliphine Chespol and bronze medallist Fancy Cherono.

Other Kenyans on the start list are former world champion Hyving Kiyeng, Caroline Tuigong, Daisy Jepkemei and Norah Jeruto for company in the water jump event.

The Kenyans water champions will battle for the honors with World champion Emma Coburn of the United States and Commonwealth Games champion Aisha Praught of Jamaica.

Africa 1,500 meters champion Winny Chebet is lined up for the event, where she faces stern test from several world beaters including England’s Laura Muir and Laura Weightman, Netherlands’ Hassan Sifan and Gudaf Tsegay of Ethiopia.

Commonwealth Games 800m champion Wycliffe Kinyamal faces off with Africa silver medallist Emmanuel Korir, Ferguson Rotich, Cornelius Tuwei, with Marcin Lewadonski of Poland also in the mix.

World Cup: Nine Kenyans in Africa’s Squad

Kenya, which topped the standings at the Africa Senior Athletics Championships in Asaba has nine athletes in Africa’s IAAF Continental Cup team for the championships to be held in Ostrava, Czech Republic on September 8-9.

Kenya with 19 medals, including 11 golds, will be represented by only nine athletes next month fewer than former champion South Africa which has the highest number of athletes, with 20.

The 2015 World javelin champion Julius Yego, who reclaimed his javelin throw title, and Mathew Sawe, who retained his high jump crown are the Kenyans in field events discipline that made it into the squad.

World, Olympics and Commonwealth Games gold medalist Conseslus Kipruto (3,000m steeplechase), World Hellen Obiri (5,000m) and Elijah Manangoi (1,500m) are in the team.

World record holder Beatrice Chepkoech (3000m steeplechase), who won women’s 3,000m steeplechase in Asaba, Wunderkind Edward Zakayo, who won the 5,000m title at the World Under-20 and Africa Championships, has been picked in his specialty.

The new Africa 1,500m champion Winny Chebet will square it off in the metric mile race with Emmanuel Korir, who settled for silver in 800m battling in the two-lap race.

The Kenyan quartet of Jared Momanyi, Alfas Kishoyian, Aaron Koech and Emmanuel Korir won the gold medal  in Asaba with a Championships Record time of 3:00.92, but none of the athletes were included in the African team.

Team Nigeria has 16 athletes; Morocco has a total of six athletes, while Egypt and Ethiopia both have four athletes on the team.

Cameroon, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Burundi, Swaziland, Uganda and Djibouti only have one athlete each on the team.

The Continental Cup is held every four years since 2010, replacing the previous Athletics World Cup and involves teams from Africa, the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe.

Kenya Rules Africa in Athletics Championships

Kenya proved her dominance in athletics once again as the East African power house edging out defending champion, South Africa and host Nigeria to win the 21st edition of the African Senior Athletics Championships rounded up yesterday at the Stephen Keshi Stadium in Asaba, Nigeria.

The East Africans, who hosted and won the 19th edition in 2014, beat defending champions, South Africa and host, Nigeria, to the second and third positions respectively.

The Kenyans swept six gold medals yesterday to bring their total medals to 19, made up of 11 gold, six silver and two bronze medals.

GOLD MEDALISTS:

  1. Hellen Obiri (5,000m),
  2. Conseslus Kipruto (3,000m steeplechase)
  3. Samuel Gathimba (20km race walk)
  4. Julius Yego (javelin)
  5. Elijah Manangoi (1500m)
  6. Winny Chebet (1500m),
  7. Edward Zakayo (5,000m)
  8. Beatrice Chepkoech (3,000m steeplechase)
  9. Mathew Sawe (high jump)
  10. Stacey Ndiwa (10,000m)
  11. Men’s 4x400m relay.

 SILVER MEDALISTS

  1.  Emmanuel Korir (800m)
  2. Grace Wanjiru (20km race walk)
  3. Timothy Cheruiyot (1500m)
  4. Celliphine Chespol (3,000m steeplechase)
  5. Alice Aprot (10,000m)
  6. Women’s 4x400m relay

BROZE

  1.  Fancy Cherono (3,000m steeplechase)
  2. Women’s 4x100m relay team

South Africa, who hosted and won the last edition in Durban, won a total of 30 medals made up of nine gold, 13 silver and eight bronze medals. Team Nigeria got 19 medals made up of nine gold, five silver and five bronze medals.

Morocco, Ethiopia, Cote d’ivoire, Tunisia and Botswana followed in that order.
For the first time in the history of the African championships, athletes from Nigeria and other African countries will not just go home with their medals, but with monetary reward.

The Local Organizing Committee of the 2018 African Senior Athletics Championship yesterday revealed prize money for athletes who won medals in Asaba.

Speaking in Asaba, LOC Chairman, Solomon Ogba, announced that athletes who won gold medal will get a cash prize of $3000 each.

Ogba added that silver medalists will be rewarded with ($2000), while bronze medalists will smile home with ($1000).

Over 120 medals were won at the 2018 African Senior Athletics Championship, tagged Asaba 2018.

The next edition of the championship will be taking place in Algeria in 2020.

 

Nigeria confirm interest in bidding for Athletics World Championships

Nigeria confirmed its interest in hosting the 2025 International Association of Athletics Federations World Championships as the African edition closed with victories for Beatrice Chepkoech and Caster Semenya in Asaba.

World record holder Chepkoech led home a 1-2 finish for Kenya in the 3,000 metres steeplechase today at the Stephen Keshi Stadium, just two weeks after her stunning 8min 44.33sec clocking at the Monaco Diamond League.

She produced a more tactical performance to triumph in 8.59.88 as team-mate Celliphine Chespol crossed second in 9:09.61.

Weyeshet Ansa Weldetsadik of Ethiopia took bronze in 9.23.92.

South Africa’s Semenya then completed the 400 and 800m double with a time of 1:56.06 over the longer distance.

Burundi’s Francine Niyonsaba took silver in an equally quick 1:57.97 and Bayih Habitam Alemu clinched another Ethiopian bronze in 1:58.86.

Marie-Josée Ta Lou, the silver medallist over 100 and 200m at last year’s World Championships in London, completed her domination of the two sprints in Nigeria.

The Ivorian won the 200m today in 22.50 to finish a huge 0.86 clear of second placed Bevina Abessolo of Cameroon.

Hor Halutie took Gambian bronze in 23.40.

There was home success for Nigeria in the women’s 400m hurdles as Glory Nathaniel won in 55.53.

South Africa’s Wenda Nel and Kenya’s Maureen Jelagat of Kenya took silver and bronze in respective times of 57.04 and 57.27.

South Africa also clinched gold in the men’s 200m as Ncincilili Titi won in 20.46 to beat Nigeria’s Oduduru Ejowvokoghene, second in 20.60, and another South African in Luxolo Adams, who was third in the same time.

It came at the end of a chaotic week of racing in which numerous organizational problems emerged.

These spanned the arrival of athletes, with many stranded in Lagos before arrival in Asaba, as well as the state of the track itself.

Nigeria’s still owe a missing $150,000 (£106,000/€121,000) mistakenly sent to the country last year by the IAAF and have so far only pledged to repay half.

Athletics Federation of Nigeria President Ibrahim Gusau insists Abuja will bid for the 2025 edition of the flagship IAAF event, however, after plans were announced to host the event in Africa.

Algeria, Egypt, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria and South Africa have all been mooted as potential hosts.

“The Abuja stadium will be renovated not just for the event but to prepare athletes, Abuja offers excellent traffic and road network complemented by standard hotels and hospitality facilities,” Gusau said, according to The Daily Trust.

“So by 2025, Nigeria will be ready to host the world.

“The Government has put not just Asaba, but Nigeria on the world map of athletics.

“There have been ups and downs, but the athletes ave been in high spirit.

“Spirit of athleticism kindled among startlets.”

source: insidethegames.biz