Tag Archives: Alberto Salazar

Yomif Kejelcha Gets Married (PHOTOS)

World silver medallist champion, Yomif Kejelcha left the singlehood face as he tied the knot with his long time sweat heart Yadu Biranu in an event that was held on Sunday (30) at the Sharatan hotel in Ethiopia.

Yomif Kejelcha Gets Married to Yadu Biranu at the Sharatan hotel in Ethiopia. Photo: Terefa Debela

Kejecha had been rumored to be dating Sifan Hassan whom in 2019 before they split with their banned coach, Alberto Salazar, The two used to share the same training group, same coach and even shared the same flat.

Their bond even bore fruits as they both broke the world mile record the same year.

The newly wed couple, Yomif Kejelcha with his wife, Yadu Biranu. Photo: Terefa Debela

 

Boston Marathon: All-time men’s, women’s winners

Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi and American Desiree Linden got to add their names to the list of Boston Marathon winners in 2018.

Kawauchi became the first Japanese men’s winner since 1987 and Linden became the first woman to win from the U.S. since 1985.

The Boston Marathon is the longest running marathon in the world. It’s been held annually since 1897. The first 69 years of the race were run by only men, with women starting to unofficially compete in 1966, then officially in 1972. The race, held on Patriots Day in the greater metro area of Boston, is also the first to incorporate a wheelchair division, starting in 1975.

Clarence DeMar holds the record for most men’s wins with seven while Catherine Ndereba has the most women’s wins with four.

Below is the all-time list of men’s and women’s winners of the Boston Marathon.

Boston Marathon: All-time winners

Men

Year Winner Country Time
1897 John J. McDermott United States 2:55:10
1898 Ronald J. MacDonald Canada 2:42:00
1899 Lawrence Brignolia United States 2:54:38
1900 John Caffery Canada 2:39:44
1901 John Caffery Canada 2:29:23
1902 Sammy Mellor United States 2:43:12
1903 John Lorden United States 2:41:29
1904 Michael Spring United States 2:38:04
1905 Frederick Lorz United States 2:38:25
1906 Tim Ford United States 2:45:45
1907 Thomas Longboat Canada 2:24:24
1908 Thomas Morrissey United States 2:25:43
1909 Henri Renaud United States 2:53:36
1910 Fred Cameron Canada 2:28:52
1911 Clarence DeMar United States 2:21:39
1912 Michael J. Ryan United States 2:21:18
1913 Fritz Carlson United States 2:25:14
1914 James Duffy Canada 2:25:14
1915 Edouard Fabre Canada 2:31:41
1916 Arthur Roth United States 2:27:16
1917 Bill Kennedy United States 2:28:37
1918 Camp Devens relay team United States 2:29:53
1919 Carl Linder United States 2:29:13
1920 Peter Trivoulides Greece 2:29:31
1921 Frank Zuna United States 2:18:57
1922 Clarence DeMar United States 2:18:10
1923 Clarence DeMar United States 2:23:47
1924 Clarence DeMar United States 2:29:40
1925 Charles Mellor United States 2:33:00
1926 Johnny Miles Canada 2:25:40
1927 Clarence DeMar United States 2:40:22
1928 Clarence DeMar United States 2:37:07
1929 Johnny Miles Canada 2:33:08
1930 Clarence DeMar United States 2:34:48
1931 James Henigan United States 2:46:45
1932 Paul de Bruyn Germany 2:33:36
1933 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:31:01
1934 Dave Komonen Canada 2:32:53
1935 John A. Kelley United States 2:32:07
1936 Ellison Brown United States 2:33:40
1937 Walter Young Canada 2:33:20
1938 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:35:34
1939 Ellison Brown United States 2:28:51
1940 Gerard Cote Canada 2:28:28
1941 Leslie S. Pawson United States 2:30:38
1942 Joe Smith United States 2:26:51
1943 Gerard Cote Canada 2:28:25
1944 Gerard Cote Canada 2:31:50
1945 John A. Kelley United States 2:30:40
1946 Stylianos Kyriakides Greece 2:29:27
1947 Suh Yun-bok South Korea 2:25:39
1948 Gerard Cote Canada 2:31:02
1949 Gosta Leandersson Sweden 2:31:50
1950 Ham Kee-Yong South Korea 2:32:39
1951 Shigeki Tanaka Japan 2:27:45
1952 Doroteo Flores Guatemala 2:31:53
1953 Keizo Yamada Japan 2:18:51
1954 Veikko Karvonen Finland 2:20:39
1955 Hideo Hamamura Japan 2:18:22
1956 Antti Viskari Finland 2:14:14
1957 John J. Kelley United States 2:20:05
1958 Franjo Mihalic Yugoslavia 2:25:54
1959 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:22:42
1960 Paavo Kotila Finland 2:20:54
1961 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:23:39
1962 Eino Oksanen Finland 2:23:48
1963 Aurele Vandendriessche Belgium 2:18:58
1964 Aurele Vandendriessche Belgium 2:19:59
1965 Morio Shigematsu Japan 2:16:33
1966 Kenji Kimihara Japan 2:17:11
1967 Dave McKenzie New Zealand 2:15:45
1968 Amby Burfoot United States 2:22:17
1969 Yoshiaki Unetani Japan 2:13:49
1970 Ron Hill United Kingdom 2:10:30
1971 Alvaro Mejia Colombia 2:18:45
1972 Olavi Suomalainen Finland 2:15:39
1973 Jon Anderson United States 2:16:03
1974 Neil Cusack Ireland 2:13:39
1975 Bill Rodgers United States 2:09:55
1976 Jack Fultz United States 2:20:19
1977 Jerome Drayton Canada 2:14:46
1978 Bill Rodgers United States 2:10:13
1979 Bill Rodgers United States 2:09:27
1980 Bill Rodgers United States 2:12:11
1981 Toshihiko Seko Japan 2:09:26
1982 Alberto Salazar United States 2:08:52
1983 Greg Meyer United States 2:09:00
1984 Geoff Smith United Kingdom 2:10:34
1985 Geoff Smith United Kingdom 2:14:05
1986 Robert de Castella Australia 2:07:51
1987 Toshihiko Seko Japan 2:11:50
1988 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:08:43
1989 Abebe Mekonnen Ethiopia 2:09:06
1990 Gelindo Bordin Italy 2:08:19
1991 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:11:06
1992 Ibrahim Hussein Kenya 2:08:14
1993 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:09:33
1994 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:07:15
1995 Cosmas Ndeti Kenya 2:09:22
1996 Moses Tanui Kenya 2:09:15
1997 Lameck Aguta Kenya 2:10:34
1998 Moses Tanui Kenya 2:07:34
1999 Joseph Chebet Kenya 2:09:52
2000 Elijah Lagat Kenya 2:09:47
2001 Lee Bong-Ju South Korea 2:09:43
2002 Rodgers Rop Kenya 2:09:02
2003 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:10:11
2004 Timothy Cherigat Kenya 2:10:37
2005 Hailu Negussie Ethiopia 2:11:44
2006 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:07:14
2007 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:14:13
2008 Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot Kenya 2:07:45
2009 Deriba Merga Ethiopia 2:08:42
2010 Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot Kenya 2:05:52
2011 Geoffrey Mutai Kenya 2:03:02
2012 Wesley Korir Kenya 2:12:40
2013 Lelisa Desisa Benti Ethiopia 2:10:22
2014 Meb Keflezighi United States 2:08:37
2015 Lelisa Desisa Benti Ethiopia 2:09:17
2016 Lemi Berhanu Hayle Ethiopia 2:12:45
2017 Geoffrey Kirui Kenya 2:09:37
2018 Yuki Kawauchi Japan 2:15:58

Women

Year Winner Country Time
1966 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:21:40
1967 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:27:17
1968 Bobbi Gibb United States 3:30:00
1969 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:22:46
1970 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:05:07
1971 Sara Mae Berman United States 3:08:30
1972 Nina Kuscsik United States 3:10:26
1973 Jacqueline Hansen United States 3:05:59
1974 Miki Gorman United States 2:47:11
1975 Liane Winter West Germany 2:42:24
1976 Kim Merritt United States 2:47:10
1977 Miki Gorman United States 2:48:33
1978 Gayle Barron United States 2:44:52
1979 Joan Benoit United States 2:35:15
1980 Rosie Ruiz* Cuba 2:31:56
1980 Jacqueline Gareau Canada 2:34:28
1981 Allison Roe New Zealand 2:26:46
1982 Charlotte Teske West Germany 2:29:33
1983 Joan Benoit United States 2:22:43
1984 Lorraine Moller New Zealand 2:29:28
1985 Lisa Larsen Weidenbach United States 2:34:06
1986 Ingrid Kristiansen Norway 2:24:55
1987 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:25:21
1988 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:24:30
1989 Ingrid Kristiansen Norway 2:24:33
1990 Rosa Mota Portugal 2:25:24
1991 Wanda Panfil Poland 2:24:18
1992 Olga Markova Russia 2:23:43
1993 Olga Markova Russia 2:25:27
1994 Uta Pippig Germany 2:21:45
1995 Uta Pippig Germany 2:25:11
1996 Uta Pippig Germany 2:27:12
1997 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:26:23
1998 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:23:21
1999 Fatuma Roba Ethiopia 2:23:25
2000 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:26:11
2001 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:23:53
2002 Margaret Okayo Kenya 2:20:43
2003 Svetlana Zakharova Russia 2:25:19
2004 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:24:27
2005 Catherine Ndereba Kenya 2:25:12
2006 Rita Jeptoo Kenya 2:23:38
2007 Lidiya Grigoryeva Russia 2:29:18
2008 Dire Tune Ethiopia 2:25:25
2009 Salina Kosgei Kenya 2:32:16
2010 Teyba Erkesso Ethiopia 2:26:11
2011 Caroline Kilel Kenya 2:22:36
2012 Sharon Cherop Kenya 2:31:50
2013 Rita Jeptoo Kenya 2:26:25
2014 Rita Jeptoo* Kenya 2:18:57
2014 Bizunesh Deba Ethiopia 2:19:59
2015 Caroline Rotich Kenya 2:24:55
2016 Atsede Baysa Ethiopia 2:29:19
2017 Edna Kiplagat Kenya 2:21:52
2018 Desiree Linden United States 2:39:54

(*) denotes disqualification

sportingnews.com

Alberto Salazar got a £125,000 bonus after sacking

Mo Farah’s disgraced former coach was paid a six-figure bonus partly out of National Lottery funding even though UK Athletics had dropped him as a consultant, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.

Alberto Salazar received £125,000 for his role between 2012 and 2016 as a bonus for helping Farah to win Olympic gold, an email obtained via a Freedom of Information request has shown. A part of that sum was public money in the form of National Lottery funding.

Salazar was paid the medal bonus even though UKA dropped a consultancy arrangement with the American coach following a BBC Panorama investigation into his methods in 2015.

The email obtained by this newspaper reveals that, in March 2017, an employee of UK Sport wrote: ‘Alberto Salazar received 125K medal bonus from UKA following [redacted] medal winning performances. Salazar’s [sic] was not contracted or employed by the sport.

[Redacted] confirmed that the funding to pay Salazar’s bonus … in the Rio cycle was from WCP [World Class Performance] pot and not UK Athletics own money.’

It can be assumed the bonuses were due to Farah’s medal-winning performances. A later email from UK Athletics states: ‘2013-2017 Olympic Coach bonus policy … Alberto Salazar (Mo Farah — men’s 5000m/10,000m)’.

Farah won double gold medals at 5,000m and 10,000m at the World Championships in 2013 and 2015 and at the Rio Olympics in 2016. He also won double gold at the 2012 London Olympics when coached by Salazar, though it appears these payments do not relate to that period.

UK Athletics, who initially hired Salazar in 2013, wanted Farah to cut ties with the coach following the BBC investigation. UKA coaches, the late Neil Black and Barry Fudge, however, strongly resisted.

Farah therefore was still using Salazar until 2017, meaning the coach still qualified for the performance bonuses. Salazar’s consultancy was role was always informal, was not contractual and he was not paid for it by UKA. As it transpired, only Farah among UK athletes made use of his coaching methods.

World Class Performance refers to UK Sport’s National Lottery funding of leading Olympians, although as is made clear, the rules changed after 2016 so that Lottery money was not used to pay coach bonuses.

A later email from UKA states that what they describe as the World Class Performance ‘pot’ to pay Salazar’s bonuses came from UK Sport money and ‘co funding from the main sponsor at the time’. The Rio cycle refer to the years running up to the 2016 Rio Olympics, 2013-2016.

However, UK Sport sent a number of emails in 2017 quizzing UKA about the arrangements. An employee at UK Sport also emphasised in the March 2017 email that the new funding agreement ‘also highlights an expectation that if a WCP [funded athlete] were entering into an unusual, novel or potentially contentious arrangement that they would they would discuss with UKS [UK Sport] prior to doing this.’

Source: dailymail.co.uk

Alberto Salazar’s lifetime ban upheld

Former American track coach Alberto Salazar’s lifetime ban appeal for sexual misconduct has been rejected by the US Center for SafeSport.

The 63-year-old was handed the lifetime ban following allegations he had emotionally and physically abused a number of athletes during his time as part of the Nike Oregon Project.

In January 2020, SafeSport temporarily banned Salazar with the decision subsequently made permanent in July 2021.

Salazar ran the Nike Oregon Project , based in Beaverton, Oregon.

It was established in 2001 and was the home of British four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah.

Farah has not been accused of doping, and left the Oregon Project in 2017.

A BBC Panorama film revealed last year that Farah was questioned about his relationship with Salazar by US investigators in 2015, but he has never failed a doping test, nor been accused of doping. Salazar also coached Dutch runner Sifan Hassan, who took triple medals at the just concluded Tokyo 2020 in the 1500m, 5000m and 10,000m. It eventually resulted in bans for both Salazar and Nike endocrinologist Dr Geoffrey Brown, announced in October 2019.

Before he became a coach, Salazar was one of the most talented distance runners of his generation, winning the New York City marathon in 1980, 1981 and 1982. He is also famous for the ‘Duel in the Sun’ at the Boston Marathon in 1982.

Mary Cain sues Nike and Alberto Salazar for $20million

Former middle-distance runner Mary Cain has filed a $20m lawsuit against disgraced coach Alberto Salazar and Nike alleging she suffered years of emotional abuse.

Cain was considered a generational talent when she was in high school and qualified for the 2013 world championships as a 17-year-old. She was a part of the Nike Oregon Project and was coached by Salazar from the age of 16.

But in 2019 she told the New York Times that rather than nurturing her talent, Salazar’s behaviour led her to self-harm and to harbour thoughts of taking her own life. “I joined Nike because I wanted to be the best female athlete ever. Instead I was emotionally and physically abused by a system designed by Alberto and endorsed by Nike,” she told the newspaper.

The Oregonian reported that Cain, who is now 25, filed the lawsuit on Monday in Oregon’s Multnomah County. The lawsuit alleges that Salazar forced Cain to get on scales in front of other people and criticised her weight. “Salazar told her that she was too fat and that her breasts and bottom were too big,” the lawsuit alleges.

Cain also alleges Salazar controlled her food intake, forcing her to steal nutrition bars from other athletes. Kristen West McCall, a lawyer representing Cain, also claims Salazar stopped the runner from getting help from her own parents. “He prevented Cain from consulting with and relying on her parents, particularly her father, who is a doctor,” McCall told the Oregonian.

McCall added that Nike did nothing to prevent the alleged abuse. “Nike was letting Alberto weight-shame women, objectify their bodies, and ignore their health and wellbeing as part of its culture,” she said. “This was a systemic and pervasive issue. And they did it for their own gratification and profit.” Nike has not commented on the lawsuit. Salazar has previously denied many of Cain’s claims and said he had supported her health and welfare.

“I never encouraged her, or worse yet, shamed her, to maintain an unhealthy weight,” he told the Oregonian in 2019. Salazar was banned for doping offences in 2019, and in September the Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld a four-year ban on appeal.

In 2019, Salazar’s former assistant Steve Magness, who became a whistleblower, said he had witnessed the same behaviour at the Oregon Project. “At one point I was told I needed to make a female athlete lose weight,” he said. “When I showed data on her body fat being low already, I was told: ‘I don’t care what the science says I know what I see with my eyes. Her butt is too big.’

There was no adult in the room, looking after health and wellbeing. When the culture pushes to the extreme, this is what you get.” Salazar coached many top athletes during his career, including Britain’s four-time Olympic champion, Sir Mo Farah.

Hassan now sets her sights on the Copenhagen Half Marathon

After winning the 3000m at the IAAF Continental Cup Ostrava 2018 in a world-leading and national record 8:27.50, Sifan Hassan will turn her attention to the roads and will run the Copenhagen Half Marathon – a five star certified road race by European Athletics Running for All – next Sunday (16).

Hassan has not raced over anything longer than 5000m this year, the distance at which she set a European record of 14:22.34 at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Rabat in July, so she is approaching the race with a mixture of trepidation and curiosity.

“It will be my first race on the roads for a long time and I’m interested to see how it will go. All my training has been for the track but, as you can see, I am in good shape. I will have to try to pace myself and I am not quite sure of the strategy, but I will get some advice and I am sure it will be fun,” said Hassan, after her victory in Ostrava where she was racing for Team Europe.

It will have been almost five years since Hassan last raced on the roads so the change of surface will be metaphorically and perhaps literally, a shock to the system but Hassan is out to enjoy the experience.

“It’s not my first half marathon, I did one before back in 2011 when I was 18 years old and I had also just started running on the track. It was in Eindhoven and I ran almost flat out for the first two kilometres and then was dying at that point but I was determined to finish and did so. In fact, I won the race in around 77 minutes (actually 1:17:10).

“I’m expecting to do better in Copenhagen but I don’t know what time I will run,” she added, deliberately not raising expectations but it’s not unreasonable to expect that Hassan will do well on the super-fast course in the Danish capital.

The European best for the year is 1:08:58 by Lonah Chemtai Salpeter – the Israeli will return to racing in October and is currently mulling over her options over which half marathon to contest – when she finished as the first European at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in Valencia at the end of March.

However, it’s not beyond the bounds of possibility that Hassan could top that, although adding another Dutch record to her list of accolades might be a tall order. This record currently stands at 1:06:25 to Lornah Kiplagat, which was a world record when she ran it to win at the 2007 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in Udine, Italy.

Hassan’s coach Alberto Salazar said last week that he could foresee her, “running between 69 and 70 minutes (in Copenhagen) although she has not been training specifically for a half marathon.”

However, Salazar advised that despite her run in the Copenhagen Half Marathon that her championship ambitions remain very much focused on the track for the next two years albeit at the longer distances. “I definitely see Sifan as very competitive in the 5000m and 10,000m at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, and after that we shall have to wait and see,” said the American.

And while Hassan doesn’t look set to follow the pace at the very front of the elite women’s race on Sunday, the inclusion of the reigning European 5000m champion is still a boon for the organisers.

“Sifan Hassan is an amazing name to add to the line-up. She ranks among the greatest athletes in Europe and we are honoured that she has chosen the CPH Half to test herself over the half marathon distance”, said Copenhagen Half Marathon competition director Henrik Paulsen, when the announcement that Hassan had been added to the field was made on Friday.

Source: european-athletics.org

Sir Mo Farah set for showdown with Rupp and Salazar at Chicago Marathon

Sir Mo Farah could be in line for a showdown with his former training partner Galen Rupp and controversial ex-coach Alberto Salazar after hinting he will run the Chicago Marathon this autumn.

Farah will hold a meeting this week with his manager Ricky Simms and coach Gary Lough to finalise his schedule and he is currently undecided between running the more lucrative New York Marathon in November or Chicago in October.

But he indicated on Monday that the latter might get the nod, which would open the way to a face-off against defending champion Rupp, who finished second to Farah in the Olympic 10,000m final at London 2012.

The American went on to win Olympic bronze in the marathon in Rio in 2016 and any clash between the two former Oregon Project team-mates would come with the added spice of pitching Farah against Rupp’s trainer Salazar, whom the Brit left last October. Salazar remains under investigation by US Anti-Doping.

‘I don’t know which marathon yet – which one invites you or which one is going to look after you,’ Farah said after beating a soft field to win the London 10,000 in 29min 44sec.

Farah beat a soft field to win the London 10,000 in 29min 44 sec on Monday. Photo: Getty Images

‘I think Chicago is a little faster. New York is a little hillier. But what athletes are they going to have? That is the key again. If you are racing against all the big names then why not learn from the big guys.

‘Rupp is running Chicago. If I want to do the (Tokyo) Olympics I have to know how to beat this guy and race this guy and how to battle with him.

‘That would answer a lot of questions for me personally. I know he is a great athlete and I have never doubted him in terms of what he is capable of..’

dailymail.co.uk

Mo Farah disputes Asbel Kiprop story on doping

Mo Farah has insisted he had frequent blood and urine tests during high‑altitude camps in Kenya and Ethiopia – and has never seen any of the shady practices exposed by Asbel Kiprop after his positive EPO test.

Kiprop, an Olympic gold medallist and three-times world champion at 1500m, said this month that he had been tipped off in advance before a drug test and had paid money to doping control officers. Those claims, along with his positive test, sent shockwaves through the sport – and raised serious questions about whether athletes in east Africa were being properly tested, with the independent Athletics Integrity Unit confirming that the tip-off took place.

However Farah, who trained in Kenya up to 2014 and has subsequently done much of his winter preparations in Ethiopia, said he has been rigorously tested in both countries.

“When I was in Ethiopia training for the London marathon I was pretty much tested on average every two weeks, and maybe even more than that,” he said. “And when I was in Kenya I was tested a similar amount, although I haven’t been since 2014.”

Mo Farah at a training camp in Kenya in 2010. Photograph: Andy Hooper/Associated Newspapers/Rex Features

When he was asked whether that included both blood and urine, Farah replied: “Yes, and the same in Ethiopia.” Farah also denied ever being asked for money by doping control officers. “No,” he replied firmly. “And for me there are a few things wrong with the Kiprop situation. First, the drug testers are not there to give you warning – they are there to surprise you and to catch you, otherwise what’s the point in testing? Second, why is anyone coming for money? That’s breaking the rules. Third, he failed a test.”

But Farah, who set a British 1500m record of 3:28:85 when finishing behind Kiprop in Monaco in 2013, admitted the latest big-name positive was desperately bad news for athletics. “Yes it is, but that’s our own fault. In this sport, because it has some negative things about it, people do ask questions of someone who has run certain times. The first thing you do is think: ‘Oh, God, has it become normal now?’ But at the same time we have to keep fighting. I just look back and you just hope he wasn’t on it when he beat me, but obviously you question it.”

Some have also questioned Farah in the past, given his former coach Alberto Salazar remains under investigation by US Anti-Doping, and his association with Jama Aden, who has been investigated by the Spanish police, but Farah has always insisted that he has done things the right way. He urged the IAAF to step up its anti‑doping work for the good of the sport. “It is a fact that other African countries are not doing what we do,” he said. “And if we don’t deal with it now, how is it going to be for the next generation?”

Lily Partridge, the first female British athlete home in last month’s London marathon, has also urged the IAAF to consider banning Kenya because of the high number of positive tests in the country in recent years.

Partridge, who finished eighth in London, warned: “We can’t lump all Kenyan athletes in the same bracket but we have to acknowledge that they aren’t under the same protocol as we are. And for a country to be so dominant, and consistently dominant, you do have to say that if they don’t have that anti-doping system in place it is open to abuse.”

Partridge said that she would favour a system similar to the one Russian athletes have to go through – where individual athletes have to be approved by the IAAF. “Until they have a system in place it is very difficult to believe or get excited about performances that come out of those countries,” she said. “I don’t want people excluded, but if that is the only way we are going to sort it out then they have to be.”

Farah, meanwhile, who will compete over 10 kilometres in the Great Manchester Run on Sunday, also confirmed he would be running an autumn marathon, most likely in New York or Chicago. And he insisted that his recent third place in the London marathon had encouraged him to think he could win a medal at next year’s world championships in Doha. “If you look at world championships and Olympics the times are not that fast, so hopefully what I did in London shows I can mix it and hopefully win a medal.”

theguardian.com

Mo Farah tainted by Alberto Salazar link, says British marathon record holder

The British marathon record holder Steve Jones fears Mo Farah will always be tainted by his association with Alberto Salazar – and says he wishes he had left his former coach years ago.

Jones fully expects Farah to shatter his 33-year-old UK record of 2:07.13 during the London Marathon on Sunday and even thinks his fellow Briton could challenge for the world record one day. But he does not understand why Farah decided to stay loyal to Salazar’s Nike Oregon Project training group until 2017, two years after they started to be investigated by the US Anti-Doping Agency – an investigation that continues.

“Personally, I would have distanced myself,” Jones said. “I said that three years ago when this whole thing blew up about Salazar. The people at Portland thought I was telling Mo to quit Salazar and get away as far as possible. I was just saying distance yourself until it either all falls back into place or the stories became true.”

Jones, who is now a distance coach in Colorado, said he was well aware of Salazar’s reputation for pushing himself to the limits since he began racing him during the 80s. “We have had some times together and I know his abilities,” he said.

“I know he is a little crazy. In marathon we are all nuts and raisins. It is what level you are. Alberto always takes things to the nth degree. I think that is what he has done with his coaching and his training.”

Jones said Salazar’s well-publicised health problems – his heart stopped for 14 minutes in 2007 – may have been a consequence of driving himself too hard. “That is what happens when you overdo things. I mean this is a little unfair to be talking about all this when we’re talking about Mo. I’m not trying to say this is the avenue Mo is taking, or anything, but there is a little taint there. It is guilt by association, I suppose, which is very unfair.”

Farah, who has always strenuously denied breaking any rules, is now coached by Gary Lough since quitting the track last year. Salazar has also consistently denied any wrongdoing after the BBC and ProPublica alleged he had broken anti-doping rules in 2015.

The 62-year-old Jones is delighted his marathon record is finally being challenged and is confident he will be bidding it a fond goodbye on Sunday. “I never thought the record would last so long. It is surprising. Although when I did it I kind of blew up in the last five or six miles so it could have been a little quicker had I not been so aggressive early on.

“When I look at my 2:07 I’m really looking at 2:05 but it’s good to see it being challenged now. I should just wave the white flag now and hand it over. I was confident in 2014 it would go, although when Mo went from talking about winning the race to breaking my record it made me think he wasn’t quite so confident. This time it’s a foregone conclusion – even a bad run this time should break the British record.”

The forecast of 23C for Sunday is likely to scupper the plans of the Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge and the Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele to challenge Dennis Kimetto’s world marathon record of 2:02:57 set in 2014.

Kipchoge ran 2:00:25 in Monza last May, but it did not count as a new best under IAAF rules because he was helped by a phalanx of pacemakers who subbed in and out of the race. However he believes he is capable of taking on Kimetto’s time at some point. “Personally I know that one day I will break a world record,” he said. “It might be too hot on Sunday but everyone is running in the same weather. I promise we will see a beautiful race.”

Kipchoge’s coach, Patrick Sang, said his man was in very similar shape to his epic run in Monza when he came so close to being the first man to run under two hours – albeit with extra help. “But the heat, of course, will have an effect,” Sang said. “To what degree, I don’t know, but it will have an impact.”

When asked whether there was still a hope of a world record on Sunday, Sang nodded before replying: “If the temperature comes down a little bit there is a big chance.”

Unfortunately for Kipchoge and Bekele the increasingly certain weather forecasts suggest that chance is dwindling by the hour.
source: theguardian.com

Kirui and Rupp renew Boston Marathon duel

U.S. Olympic bronze medallist Galen Rupp lost to Kirui by 21 seconds in the 2017 race and is back while New York City Marathon champion – and home state favourite – Shalane Flanagan headlines a group of four top U.S. women’s contenders.

Rain and temperatures in the 50s (13 C) after an icy weekend are forecast, making for a messy race day.

That could be a factor, especially for the African athletes.

No American man has won in Boston since 1983, and Kirui, former champions Lelisa Desisa and Lemi Berhanu of Ethiopia, Ethiopian Tamirat Tola, the fastest in the field at 2:04.06, and Kenyan dark horse Nobert Kigen are aiming to keep it that way.

Yet many believe Chicago Marathon winner Rupp will have a say.

“Galen will definitely be much harder to beat than last year, regardless of how the race plays out,” Alberto Salazar, his coach and a former Boston champion, told reporters.

“But Kirui or the others may also be in better shape than last year, so it’s impossible to predict.”

The final few miles proved costly in 2017 to Rupp, who admitted afterwards: “I just did not have it over those last three or four miles.”

Kirui, 25, backed up his Boston win, his first victory in a marathon, by taking the 2017 world championship title. He carries a personal best of 2:06:27 to Rupp’s 2:09:20.

The U.S. women’s drought at Boston stretches back to 1985.

Flanagan, Jordan Hasay, Molly Huddle and Desi Linden will try to change that against an international field that may not be as strong as in past years.

Flanagan, 36, who grew up in Massachusetts, is the sentimental favourite, with Hasay holding the best Boston finish.

The 26-year-old made it to the podium in 2017, finishing third at both Boston and Chicago. The Boston race was her marathon debut.

Linden and Huddle are both experienced marathoners with Linden fourth in Boston in 2017 and Huddle third in the 2016 New York City Marathon.

Kiplagat, the Kenyan mother of five who is now 38, returns to defend her title after finishing second in the world championships and fourth in New York City in 2017.

Aselefech Mergia, a former London winner, and fellow Ethiopian Mamitu Daska, who was third in New York last year, could be Kiplagat’s biggest international challengers along with former Boston winners Buzunesh Deba (Ethiopia) and Caroline Rotich (Kenya).