Tag Archives: 2016 Rio Olympics

Court Summons Legendary Kipchoge Keino to face Graft Charges

The legendary and Kenya’s celebrated athlete Kipchoge Keino has been summoned to appear in court over the 2016 Rio Olympics scandal over misappropriation of Ksh.55 million.

Anti-Corruption court Chief Magistrate Douglas Ogoti directed Keino a former National Olympic Committee of Kenya (NOCK) chairman to appear in court on Friday, (October 19) alongside ex Sports minister Dr Hasan Wario.

Keino and Wario, who is currently Kenya’s ambassador to Austria, are set to face graft charges alongside other NOCK officials and Ministry of Sports officers  implicated in the misappropriation of funds that were set aside for the Rio Olympic games.

Keino and Wario were expected to appear in court on Monday together former Principal Secretary Richard Ekai, the then Rio Games Chief De Mission Stephen Soi and NOCK Secretary General Francis Kinyili. To face graft charges but the duo were not available.

According to Keino, through his lawyer asked to be excused from Monday’s appearance because was out of the country and will be back on Thursday.

The Director of Criminal Investigations (DCI) George Kinoti issued an arrest warrant for Wario’s arrest through Interpol.

 

Mo Farah to battle Galen Rupp at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that four-time Olympic gold medalist, six-time world champion and five-time European champion Mo Farah will join the 2018 Chicago Marathon elite competition.

In 2012, Farah became the first British athlete in history to win an Olympic gold at the 10,000m, and he is just the second athlete in history to pull off back-to-back gold medals in both the 5000m and 10,000m at the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games.

The Chicago Marathon marks Farah’s third go at the distance and his first 42K on U.S. soil. He joins defending champion and former training partner, Galen Rupp, at the front of this year’s elite pack. Farah and Rupp made history together at the 2012 London Olympics, finishing with the gold and silver in the 10,000m.

“Mo and Galen are two of the greatest distance runners of all time,” said Executive Race Director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon Carey Pinkowski. “They come to Chicago following in the footsteps of incredible runners like Khalid Khannouchi, Sammy Wanjiru, Moses Tanui, Paul Tergat, Steve Jones and more.

These two runners have competed at the highest level of competition and I’m confident they will come prepared for what’s shaping up to be an epic showdown.”

Farah made his marathon debut in 2014 in London, clocking 2:08: 21 to finish eighth. He refocused his energy on the track and the 2016 Rio Olympics before tackling the distance again this spring. He finished third in London with a new personal best and a national record, 2:06:21. Farah dazzled fans at the 2016 Rio Olympics when he experienced a dramatic fall, tumbling hard to the track, in the 10,000m.

Instead of panicking, he found his feet, rejoined the pack and ran away from the rest of the field to win gold. In addition to his Olympic and world titles, he has landed on the top of the podium 20 times in the Diamond League track competitions.

Farah holds national track records in the 1500m, 3000m, two-mile, 5000m and 10,000m, and British road records in the 5K, 10K, 20K, half marathon and marathon. In 2017, Farah was named BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year.

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon in 2018 will re-introduce pacers ” “rabbits” ” into the elite competition after breaking from the tradition for the past few years.

“The championship style of racing that spectators enjoy will continue as the race enters its final miles,” Pinkowski said. “The epic 2010 duel between the late Wanjiru and Tsegaye Kebede – arguably one of the greatest finishes in marathon history – underscores the importance of the tactics that still exist and flourish in paced races.”

Pinkowski and event organizers decided to transition back to pacers to leverage the speed of the course, to work towards setting up ideal conditions for the top tier elite athletes confirmed so far, and to respond to feedback received from runners.

“We listened to the athletes and they want to come to Chicago because of our tradition of fast times and our legacy as a world record course,” continued Pinkowski. “If athletes want to run in races without pacers, there are several opportunities for them to do so.”

runnersweb.com

Report: Ruth Jebet fails doping test

Ruth Jebet, the reigning Olympic 3,000m steeplechase champion and world record holder, has become the highest-profile Kenya-born athlete to become embroiled in a drug-testing scandal.

Although the news has not yet been confirmed, a number of prominent sources have suggested Jebet has tested positive for a performance-enhancing drug, believed to be the blood booster EPO.

The Athletics Integrity Unit, which processes all doping tests in track and field, said it was unable to confirm the result of any tests under the World Anti-Doping code. Meanwhile, Jebet’s agent, Marc Corstjens, said he had not heard any news of a positive tests. “Honestly I am surprised and shocked. I am absolutely not aware of anything. I tried to reach Ruth but her phone is not answering. I have absolutely no official information.”

The 21-year-old is seen as one of athletic’s brightest stars having won a stunning gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics before shattering the world record while still a teenager. She is also a controversial figure in Kenya, having switched allegiances to run for Bahrain after being approached as a 16-year-old and promised a full scholarship to take an animal health degree in the country.

Yet with Jebet spending most of her time training in Kenya, this may raise more questions about how many of the country’s athletes are clean – and whether enough is being done by the authorities to find out.

Between 2011 and 2016, more than 40 athletes from Kenya failed doping tests, including Rita Jeptoo, the three‑times Boston marathon champion, who was given a four-year ban after testing positive for EPO in 2014.

Last year Jeptoo’s former training partner, the Olympic and London marathon winner Jemima Sumgong, was also banned for four years after her claim she was taking EPO for an ectopic pregnancy was rejected.

Yet if Jebet’s failed test is confirmed it will be a bigger shock still. When she took gold in the women’s 3,000m steeplechase at Rio in 8:59:75 – at that point the second-fastest time in history – she was hailed as “Golden Ruth”, although she was greeted with boos in her homeland because she beat Kenya’s Hyvin Jepkemoi into second.

It emerged the Bahrain government had paid Jebet a $500,000 bonus for her Olympic success. By contrast David Rudisha, who won the 800m in Rio in a Kenyan vest, received $10,000 from his government.

Two years ago Kenya was deemed “non-compliant” by Wada but it was reinstated before the Rio Olympics. However, many athletes have suggested not enough is done to test athletes training in the country. The Canadian runner Reid Coolsaet said in 2016: “Kenyan-style anti-doping test. Notify us the night before. One-hour drive to test site at 5am. Many Olympic medallists in house. It was an IAAF accredited test. Procedures are far from what I’m used to in Canada.”

In 2013 another high-profile Kenyan, Matthew Kisorio, told the German broadcaster ARD he took illegal drugs “because everyone told me, I wasn’t the only one – and none of the others got caught for doping”.

He added: “I know a lot of medical substances are used, which are injected straight to the blood for the body to have more oxygen. And when you run, you run so smooth. You have more stamina.”

Source: theguardian.com